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Old 03-31-2015, 07:12 PM
 
4,503 posts, read 4,180,967 times
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Originally Posted by JayCT View Post
This is kind of hard to measure it this way. Even the worst performing schools in Connecticut send students to good colleges. Jay
True, but will a mid level or lower tier school that offers fewer AP/advanced classes be able to prepare one adequately for a top university? I knew a kid that graduated #2 in his class in a mid level school in CT and got into the University of Virginia, one of the top state schools in the country. However, because the high school only offered a limited amount of AP classes, he was behind a lot of the other students coming into UVa and got frustrated and ended up transferring back to UConn.
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Old 04-01-2015, 06:46 AM
 
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Originally Posted by NewJeffCT View Post
True, but will a mid level or lower tier school that offers fewer AP/advanced classes be able to prepare one adequately for a top university? I knew a kid that graduated #2 in his class in a mid level school in CT and got into the University of Virginia, one of the top state schools in the country. However, because the high school only offered a limited amount of AP classes, he was behind a lot of the other students coming into UVa and got frustrated and ended up transferring back to UConn.
To answer the first question...yes. It depends on the kid. Plus college is supposed to be tougher. There are also honors classes that can be tougher than AP and a lot of administrators will tell you that AP can be quite overrated. Don't even get me started on the semi-scam it's become and how so many kids are not getting credit when they get to college.
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Old 04-01-2015, 05:49 PM
 
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Originally Posted by AMSS View Post
To answer the first question...yes. It depends on the kid. Plus college is supposed to be tougher. There are also honors classes that can be tougher than AP and a lot of administrators will tell you that AP can be quite overrated. Don't even get me started on the semi-scam it's become and how so many kids are not getting credit when they get to college.
I said AP & advanced classes.

If somebody is going into a math intensive major in college and starts off a year to a year and a half behind most of the other freshman in math and maybe a semester in one of the science classes, it's going to be difficult for them to catch up over the course of four years because they'll have to work extra hard to play catch up and risk falling further behind because they're not going to meet prerequisites for other classes until they catch up in math and science.

Sure, it can be done, but it also places an undue burden on the student to have to work harder than his or her peers just to get on the same page as them. It might take them 5 years to do with others are doing in 4.
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Old 04-01-2015, 07:13 PM
 
2,643 posts, read 1,886,182 times
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Originally Posted by NewJeffCT View Post
I said AP & advanced classes.

If somebody is going into a math intensive major in college and starts off a year to a year and a half behind most of the other freshman in math and maybe a semester in one of the science classes, it's going to be difficult for them to catch up over the course of four years because they'll have to work extra hard to play catch up and risk falling further behind because they're not going to meet prerequisites for other classes until they catch up in math and science.

Sure, it can be done, but it also places an undue burden on the student to have to work harder than his or her peers just to get on the same page as them. It might take them 5 years to do with others are doing in 4.
You do what you gotta do. Some people just won't be able to afford a home in the surrounding towns. That's not always a bad thing. I'm at a lot of different schools for my job and the level of anxiety over things you and I would say "huh?" to in a suburban school make me breathe a sigh of relief when I walk into an inner city school. Sure there are some rough kids there, but the majority of kids are good, unspoiled and actually have coping skills...can you tell what kind of week I had?
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