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Old 01-20-2021, 09:35 PM
 
Location: The South
848 posts, read 1,051,041 times
Reputation: 1007

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Self-driving cars are fine... IF you can afford one. Wages aren't budging. Meanwhile, the places where minimum wages and low-income workers live are far from where jobs are being created. It used to be that factories were built and houses and other uses adjacent to the factories. Workers walked or took streetcars to jobs. These towns and places are all over Connecticut... People who like to ridicule rail transit forget that rail was responsible for building the most efficient use of land in our history. Compact, walkable, towns and cities are a more fiscally-efficient pattern of development than automobile-dependent ones. for one, you spend less money on roads, water and sewer lines, police and fire, schools, and libraries. Sprawl is fiscally inefficient. Connecticut is littered with compact towns and cities where existing infrastructure and facilities are underutilized. Making the right decisions about transportation can help Connecticut maximize investments it already made. Even Sunbelt cities like Charlotte get this which is why voters there continue to approve taxes for more rail transit. Nearly $1 trillion in new development has occurred along the city's first light rail corridor since it opened 10 years ago. People pay more for houses in the centers of cities in NC than they do in the suburbs; the exact opposite of CT. Connecticut isn't growing as fast as North Carolina, but the rules aren't different. The bottom line is that development follows transportation and transportation determines the form and function of the built environment. If you want a state of tax wasting automobile dependency where the poor can't access jobs and education, keep spending money on roads. PS North Carolina has County school districts -- rich towns don't get an advantage over poor ones; regionalism isn't a bad word and racial, ethnic, and income segregation isn't as bad because of it.

Last edited by urbanmyth; 01-20-2021 at 09:49 PM..
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Old 01-21-2021, 11:03 AM
 
Location: Connecticut
33,001 posts, read 52,264,771 times
Reputation: 10517
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanmyth View Post
Self-driving cars are fine... IF you can afford one. Wages aren't budging. Meanwhile, the places where minimum wages and low-income workers live are far from where jobs are being created. It used to be that factories were built and houses and other uses adjacent to the factories. Workers walked or took streetcars to jobs. These towns and places are all over Connecticut... People who like to ridicule rail transit forget that rail was responsible for building the most efficient use of land in our history. Compact, walkable, towns and cities are a more fiscally-efficient pattern of development than automobile-dependent ones. for one, you spend less money on roads, water and sewer lines, police and fire, schools, and libraries. Sprawl is fiscally inefficient. Connecticut is littered with compact towns and cities where existing infrastructure and facilities are underutilized. Making the right decisions about transportation can help Connecticut maximize investments it already made. Even Sunbelt cities like Charlotte get this which is why voters there continue to approve taxes for more rail transit. Nearly $1 trillion in new development has occurred along the city's first light rail corridor since it opened 10 years ago. People pay more for houses in the centers of cities in NC than they do in the suburbs; the exact opposite of CT. Connecticut isn't growing as fast as North Carolina, but the rules aren't different. The bottom line is that development follows transportation and transportation determines the form and function of the built environment. If you want a state of tax wasting automobile dependency where the poor can't access jobs and education, keep spending money on roads. PS North Carolina has County school districts -- rich towns don't get an advantage over poor ones; regionalism isn't a bad word and racial, ethnic, and income segregation isn't as bad because of it.
You seem to ignore the fact that Connecticut has invested several billion in mass transit in the past decade or two. The state has purchased new rail cars for the New Haven Line and Shoreline East. It has upgraded the power catenary system and tracks on the New Haven Line and added new stations in Fairfield and West Haven. They have expanded Shoreline East and built new stations in downtown New Haven, and four other towns. It has rebuilt and expanded the New Haven Railyard and made improvements to the Bridgeport and Stamford yards. It has begun CTrail train service that connects New Haven, Hartford and Springfield and built new stations in Wallingford, Meriden, Berlin and Windsor. It is about to build stations in North Haven, Windsor Locks and Enfield. It built and started CTfastrak service from New Britain to Hartford and beyond to Manchester. I’m not sure what more you expect from our state. If you look there has been massive private investments all around these lines including Stamford, Norwalk, Fairfield, Bridgeport, Milford, West Haven, New Haven, ?Meriden, Berlin, Hartford, West Hartford, Windsor, Windsor Locks and New Britain. It’s pretty clear our state has not ignored mass transit. Jay
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Old 01-21-2021, 12:25 PM
 
153 posts, read 79,276 times
Reputation: 237
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayCT View Post
You seem to ignore the fact that Connecticut has invested several billion in mass transit in the past decade or two. The state has purchased new rail cars for the New Haven Line and Shoreline East. It has upgraded the power catenary system and tracks on the New Haven Line and added new stations in Fairfield and West Haven. They have expanded Shoreline East and built new stations in downtown New Haven, and four other towns. It has rebuilt and expanded the New Haven Railyard and made improvements to the Bridgeport and Stamford yards. It has begun CTrail train service that connects New Haven, Hartford and Springfield and built new stations in Wallingford, Meriden, Berlin and Windsor. It is about to build stations in North Haven, Windsor Locks and Enfield. It built and started CTfastrak service from New Britain to Hartford and beyond to Manchester. I’m not sure what more you expect from our state. If you look there has been massive private investments all around these lines including Stamford, Norwalk, Fairfield, Bridgeport, Milford, West Haven, New Haven, ?Meriden, Berlin, Hartford, West Hartford, Windsor, Windsor Locks and New Britain. It’s pretty clear our state has not ignored mass transit. Jay
Seems like you missed the point entirely. Those rails only take you to other towns and cities, they don't facilitate transportation within the city or town itself. Who cares if you can go from one poor city like Hartford to another poor city like Springfield? The cities themselves are depressed and have no efficient public transport infrastructure.
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Old 01-21-2021, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Connecticut
33,001 posts, read 52,264,771 times
Reputation: 10517
Quote:
Originally Posted by okbymeman View Post
Seems like you missed the point entirely. Those rails only take you to other towns and cities, they don't facilitate transportation within the city or town itself. Who cares if you can go from one poor city like Hartford to another poor city like Springfield? The cities themselves are depressed and have no efficient public transport infrastructure.
You obviously do not know transportation in Connecticut or our cities. I would not call Stamford depressed, nor even Hartford or New Haven. All three have seen thousands of new housing units that are being built and occupied. They have some of the tightest rental markets in the country. And need I remind you Hartford is the second largest employment center in New England with more than 115,000 jobs. That’s hardly depressed.

If you knew our cities you’d know that various Transportation options have been evaluated and because of the physical constraints of our local roads, local rail service was found to be not feasible. That’s kind of why you don’t see more of it in older cities in the northeast. That said, CTfastrak is a local express busway that serves New Britain, West Hartford and Hartford. Remember our cities are small so it’s kind of hard to provide express service with Hartford itself. Not sure why you would want that or what difference it makes. Besides our local bus service is pretty extensive. Not sure what more can be provided. Jay
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Old 01-21-2021, 04:22 PM
 
Location: The South
848 posts, read 1,051,041 times
Reputation: 1007
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayCT View Post
You seem to ignore the fact that Connecticut has invested several billion in mass transit in the past decade or two. The state has purchased new rail cars for the New Haven Line and Shoreline East. It has upgraded the power catenary system and tracks on the New Haven Line and added new stations in Fairfield and West Haven. They have expanded Shoreline East and built new stations in downtown New Haven, and four other towns. It has rebuilt and expanded the New Haven Railyard and made improvements to the Bridgeport and Stamford yards. It has begun CTrail train service that connects New Haven, Hartford and Springfield and built new stations in Wallingford, Meriden, Berlin and Windsor. It is about to build stations in North Haven, Windsor Locks and Enfield. It built and started CTfastrak service from New Britain to Hartford and beyond to Manchester. I’m not sure what more you expect from our state. If you look there has been massive private investments all around these lines including Stamford, Norwalk, Fairfield, Bridgeport, Milford, West Haven, New Haven, ?Meriden, Berlin, Hartford, West Hartford, Windsor, Windsor Locks and New Britain. It’s pretty clear our state has not ignored mass transit. Jay
I know about these investments and think the addition of the Hartford Line is a GREAT investment. It can help to revitalize the depressed town centers. My post was really addressed to the people who think rail transit is a waste of money because the fares don't cover the cost of service. What these people also forget is that when rail transit (streetcar, inter-urban, subway) systems were private, owned, and run by private companies, most weren't making money on the operation of the trains. They were making money on the profits from the use of the lands they owned. You and I get it. Unfortunately, there are too many people who don't.
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Old 01-25-2021, 08:11 AM
 
Location: Ubique
4,300 posts, read 3,920,734 times
Reputation: 2817
Pandemic has the potential to make a lot of long term changes on land use. If many workers can continue to work remote, the need for transportation would look a lot different. I cannot believe I merged at full speed on I-95 Stamford today.
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Old 02-09-2021, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Connecticut
33,001 posts, read 52,264,771 times
Reputation: 10517
There is an interesting article in today’s Courant about the state’s study of transportation in greater Hartford. This will be a long term comprehensive plan that will include all forms of transportation including pedestrian, mass transit, bicycle and vehicular. It will cover the region from West Hartford to Manchester and Cromwell to Windsor Locks. It will look at such ideas as tunneling on the city for I-91 and I-84 and ways to fund it. The plan won’t be complete until the end of next year but meetings will be held and comments received over the year and a half. Should be interesting to see where this goes. Jay

https://www.courant.com/business/hc-...oh4-story.html
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Old 04-11-2021, 09:25 AM
 
Location: Connecticut
33,001 posts, read 52,264,771 times
Reputation: 10517
This is a pretty ignorant opinion piece on the Route 15/7 interchange project in Norwalk. It’s along the lines of “If you don’t build it, you don’t have a problem”. With that kind of thinking, we should just tear down I-95 and the Merritt Parkway and the traffic problems in Fairfield County go away. Pretty easy, except it solves nothing.

One of the biggest problems the county faces is the lack of connectivity between limited access highways. This problem has plagued the county for decades and continues to this day. If there are traffic problems on I-95 southbound in Darien, the state can’t easily divert traffic to the Merritt Parkway because there’s no connection between Route 7 Northbound and the Merritt Southbound. Similarly if there’s a problem on the Merritt Parkway Southbound in New Canaan, there’s no direct way to divert traffic to I-95. The Route 15/7 interchange solves that by adding these connections.

Instead of these direct connections, opponents are proposing to install traffic signals on Route 7 and construct at grade intersections instead of ramps. This eliminates the need for multiple bridges over and under the existing highways but also simply does not work. How can anyone advocate a solution that doesn’t solve the problem, yet that’s what these opponents want.

https://ctmirror.org/2021/04/10/clos...ers-new-phase/

It’s interesting that I’ve talked with a few of these vocal opponents and they don’t want to hear reason and will immediately shut off anyone that tries to reason with them. Even worse is that the area’s regional planning agency, Western Connecticut Regional Planning Agency (formerly Southwestern Regional Planning Agency) has for decades pandered to these opponents which has delayed the project. It’s pretty sad IMHO. Jay
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Old 04-11-2021, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Connecticut
5,027 posts, read 4,339,143 times
Reputation: 3522
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayCT View Post
This is a pretty ignorant opinion piece on the Route 15/7 interchange project in Norwalk. It’s along the lines of “If you don’t build it, you don’t have a problem”. With that kind of thinking, we should just tear down I-95 and the Merritt Parkway and the traffic problems in Fairfield County go away. Pretty easy, except it solves nothing.

One of the biggest problems the county faces is the lack of connectivity between limited access highways. This problem has plagued the county for decades and continues to this day. If there are traffic problems on I-95 southbound in Darien, the state can’t easily divert traffic to the Merritt Parkway because there’s no connection between Route 7 Northbound and the Merritt Southbound. Similarly if there’s a problem on the Merritt Parkway Southbound in New Canaan, there’s no direct way to divert traffic to I-95. The Route 15/7 interchange solves that by adding these connections.

Instead of these direct connections, opponents are proposing to install traffic signals on Route 7 and construct at grade intersections instead of ramps. This eliminates the need for multiple bridges over and under the existing highways but also simply does not work. How can anyone advocate a solution that doesn’t solve the problem, yet that’s what these opponents want.

https://ctmirror.org/2021/04/10/clos...ers-new-phase/

It’s interesting that I’ve talked with a few of these vocal opponents and they don’t want to hear reason and will immediately shut off anyone that tries to reason with them. Even worse is that the area’s regional planning agency, Western Connecticut Regional Planning Agency (formerly Southwestern Regional Planning Agency) has for decades pandered to these opponents which has delayed the project. It’s pretty sad IMHO. Jay



Do you think this is because of businesses that don't want to lose drive-by / drive-thru traffic ? If there was a highway no one would stop.
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Old 04-11-2021, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Connecticut
33,001 posts, read 52,264,771 times
Reputation: 10517
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrGompers View Post
Do you think this is because of businesses that don't want to lose drive-by / drive-thru traffic ? If there was a highway no one would stop.
I doubt it. Norwalk is a small city with a lot of corporate offices and businesses. I doubt many businesses rely on drive by traffic. Jay
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