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Old 05-25-2015, 06:30 PM
 
10,391 posts, read 7,472,821 times
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I'm SO looking forward to having a garden. I know it's too late this year - we won't be there for another few weeks, then another few weeks until the house closes. We have trees so I'll have to learn the sun/shade of the property.

I want to have bee friendly flowers. I want to have plants indigenous to the CT. Vegetables will be nice.

I saw the growing schedule on the almanac site (very cool).

So for now I just want to hear about YOUR gardens. How's it growing? Flood me with greenery... and tomatery and squashery....
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Old 05-26-2015, 05:05 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
64,990 posts, read 47,303,288 times
Reputation: 10512
Quote:
Originally Posted by hunterseat View Post
I'm SO looking forward to having a garden. I know it's too late this year - we won't be there for another few weeks, then another few weeks until the house closes. We have trees so I'll have to learn the sun/shade of the property.

I want to have bee friendly flowers. I want to have plants indigenous to the CT. Vegetables will be nice.

I saw the growing schedule on the almanac site (very cool).

So for now I just want to hear about YOUR gardens. How's it growing? Flood me with greenery... and tomatery and squashery....
Now there's a thread I didn't think of. Gardens & Crops in CT. I'm curious myself about what others are doing in the state and how its going.

First, good luck with the closing.
Second, make sure nobody is allergic to bees before inviting them to your home.
Third, Lets talk veggies

Yeah, first thing is to take note of the sun and shade schedule. What might be sunny in July, might not be in May because of the sun angle. Pick an area that's south facing if possible and make sure there's at least 6hrs of sunlight.

Next important step is to prepare the bed or beds. This involves a whole post. Best quickest advice is to dig down 2 feet, get rid of all rocks! (you will appreciate this in the future). Add Compost, manure, organic top soil.

I been amending my soil for years and the clay soil here is just disgusting. Looks like cement when dry and Playdoh when wet.

Get a soil test done.

Crops I don't do anymore.
Strawberries (not worth the space and yields)
Squash/Pumpkins/Watermelon (not worth the space)
Corn (soil, sunlight, and heat not enough for them)
Broccoli & Brussel Sprouts(didn't have luck for 2 yrs)
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Old 05-26-2015, 05:15 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
64,990 posts, read 47,303,288 times
Reputation: 10512
Some pics I just took.

Radish anyone?



Onions



Potatoes



Garlic and Cucumbers



Fava Beans



40 Tomato plants. A few started flowering



Bell Peppers still young

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Old 05-26-2015, 06:38 AM
 
2,505 posts, read 2,420,064 times
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Two weeks ago I planted the following:

Onions - 12 Bulbs
Butternut Squash - 2 Plants (they look lonely because they are on a side by themselves, but they grow...a lot)
Sweet Peppers - 10 Plants
Sweet Corn - 20 Stalks (last year was terrible, but I studied up for this year)
Also, 2 apple trees, pear tree and a ton of grape vines.

My backyard gets full sun from about 11am to 7pm. My house was an old farm back in the mid 1800's so the soil has been working for almost 200 years. Sometimes when I'm working in the soil, I think that someone 150 years ago was doing the exact same thing. History like that you can't get from newer homes.



I want to expand next year!


Last edited by Mr_250; 05-26-2015 at 07:14 AM..
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Old 05-26-2015, 07:56 AM
 
Location: Sneads Ferry, NC
11,090 posts, read 18,618,422 times
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Great pictures!
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Old 05-26-2015, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
64,990 posts, read 47,303,288 times
Reputation: 10512
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr_250 View Post
Two weeks ago I planted the following:

Onions - 12 Bulbs
Butternut Squash - 2 Plants (they look lonely because they are on a side by themselves, but they grow...a lot)
Sweet Peppers - 10 Plants
Sweet Corn - 20 Stalks (last year was terrible, but I studied up for this year)
Also, 2 apple trees, pear tree and a ton of grape vines.

My backyard gets full sun from about 11am to 7pm. My house was an old farm back in the mid 1800's so the soil has been working for almost 200 years. Sometimes when I'm working in the soil, I think that someone 150 years ago was doing the exact same thing. History like that you can't get from newer homes.

I want to expand next year!
Your pic isn't showing.. Nice crops you got! I wonder how you deal with the squirrels and birds with the apple trees. My neighbor took down his peach tree cause animals would get to it first. lol

Let us know how your corn does, I'm curious.

Cool story on the house! yeah, you got some good soil there (maybe depleated but that's easily adjustable).

Before my house was built it was a cow farm in the 1800s. Grazing on the hill where my home sits now. But when they built the house/neighborhood, they used crap fill dirt in the backyard.

That's why I do my own compost piles now. Every fall I pile the leaves in this spot. Kitchen scrap, grass clippings from neighbors sometimes, manure and hay go in there and trimmings from hedges and weeds..

Every spring/summer I turn it. Some of it is ready to use in the spring, most will be broken down by fall. Adding it to the garden is so key.

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Old 05-26-2015, 08:56 AM
 
2,505 posts, read 2,420,064 times
Reputation: 1391
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
Your pic isn't showing.. Nice crops you got! I wonder how you deal with the squirrels and birds with the apple trees. My neighbor took down his peach tree cause animals would get to it first. lol

Let us know how your corn does, I'm curious.

Cool story on the house! yeah, you got some good soil there (maybe depleated but that's easily adjustable).

Before my house was built it was a cow farm in the 1800s. Grazing on the hill where my home sits now. But when they built the house/neighborhood, they used crap fill dirt in the backyard.

That's why I do my own compost piles now. Every fall I pile the leaves in this spot. Kitchen scrap, grass clippings from neighbors sometimes, manure and hay go in there and trimmings from hedges and weeds..

Every spring/summer I turn it. Some of it is ready to use in the spring, most will be broken down by fall. Adding it to the garden is so key.
I don't know how to post pictures here.

The animals are kept to a minimum with the help of two large hawks that live in the trees behind my house. It's funny because I have a fake hawk on top of the fence around the garden. One day I was sitting in my car and saw it move. I looked harder and it was the real hawk sitting next to the fake one. lol

Corn came out horrible last year. I left it on the stalk to long.

I do what you do with compost, be it, a smaller pile. I also stole your hay idea from your earlier pictures. Sorry. it worked very well keeping the moisture in and also helped with weed control.
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Old 05-26-2015, 09:42 AM
 
68 posts, read 57,300 times
Reputation: 31
I have a giant horseradish clump growing, but that's been it. Currently the garden plot is left to its own devices . I used to overwinter my garden in CA by growing fava beans. I miss being able to have 2 planting seasons, but then again, there's no water now.
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Old 05-26-2015, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Connecticut
24,576 posts, read 40,130,038 times
Reputation: 6942
I used to have a garden with tomatoes, carrots, cucumbers, etc. I spent a fortune and a lot of time tending it. The hardest part was keeping it watered since we did not have a sprinkler system at the time and we would like to go away on vacation in the summer. Still I could never figure out why I was not getting a lot out of it. Then one day our dog showed up at the back door with a tomato in his mouth. Despite having a fence around it he figured out a way to get in there and carefully take different things. He was so careful you never really saw any damage like you did if it was deer. The killer was that I found that when you figured what it cost to have the garden, it was cheaper to just go around the corner to the farm stand and buy it directly. Maybe not quite as good but for us it was fine. Jay
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Old 05-26-2015, 02:27 PM
 
Location: In a house
13,258 posts, read 34,613,675 times
Reputation: 20198
I grow herbs. Bees LOVE flowering perennial herbs. I grow two varieties of oregano, spike lavender, echinacea, English lavender, true melissa (aka bee balm), three types of mint plus catnip, winter savory. I've recently added dill and lemon thyme, but they're in the in the converted antique bathroom sink (now a planter) under the maple tree. The bees will likely not bother with the dill. Sometimes I try to grow basil and rosemary but it's always a lesson in futility.

My oregano harvest lasts all summer - I can cut stems starting right around now, into October. I cut a few fistsful, tie them with twine, and hang them upside down over the kitchen sink. They dry out usually within a few days, and then I can scrape them against a spagetti strainer and the dried herb ends up in a bowl under the strainer. In a single season I yield around a pound of dried oregano leaf. It's pretty ridiculous (the average Italian mom goes through maybe 4 ounces in a year; a pound is 16 ounces). I give it to neighbors and my sister
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