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Old 08-23-2009, 08:37 AM
 
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Default Is Connecticut rural?

When you think of Connecticut, do you think of it as a mostly urban state or mostly rural? (More or less so than MA?)

 
Old 08-23-2009, 10:10 AM
 
Location: New England
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jp646 View Post
When you think of Connecticut, do you think of it as a mostly urban state or mostly rural? (More or less so than MA?)
Yes.

It's has a high density, but is hardly "urban"...and also not "rural" in the sense the rest of the nation knows. Kind of an interesting blend of both I guess...it's what keeps me intrigued.
 
Old 08-23-2009, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Fairfield County, CT
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I will echo JViello's excellent response and add:

It's not just a matter off rural versus urban. Connecticut in a very small area offers more varied landscapes, geography, densities, and lifestyles than most large states. You have small working class villages that were built on the fishing industry, ultra wealthy suburban communities, middle class city and suburbs, areas that are flat, hilly, densely populated and sparsely populated. Nothing is more than two hours away--

That's one of the things that, I believe, makes Connecticut special. Have breakfast on the shore, lunch in the hills in a forest like setting, and dinner in the city at a ball game and still sleep in your own bed at night.

Hope this helps....
 
Old 08-23-2009, 10:45 AM
 
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There are parts of Connecticut that are surprisingly rural.
 
Old 08-23-2009, 11:17 AM
 
Location: Groton, CT
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Hardly an urban state, but hardly a rural one either. Cities, in the more popular sense, aren't very common in CT, but you could drive clear across the state and never see a farm. It is pretty densely populated as a whole, but it isn't crowded. It is a unique blend. I haven't been to all of MA, but I would compare the two as similar. Southern CT is more dense than northern CT, and eastern MA is more dense than western MA. MA is close to twice the size of CT so you can't really say one or the other.
 
Old 08-23-2009, 11:20 AM
 
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Interesting responses thus far. Personally, I think of MA as more urban because the Boston metro area expands all the way to Worcester. Shrewsbury, which boarders Worcester's eastern edge, is considered a suburb of both Worcester and Boston. CT doesn't really have any area with this many urban/suburban towns clustered together for such a long stretch. I would say, regardless of size, the majority of the state of MA is urban. Agree? Disagree?
 
Old 08-23-2009, 11:29 AM
 
Location: Live in NY State, (sometimes) work in CT
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Much of CT's soil is rocky, leading to no major agriculture (although farms certainly do exist). I think it is a very unique state of a lot of small cities and towns, with some very pretty rural areas here and there.
 
Old 08-23-2009, 12:04 PM
 
Location: Fairfield County, CT
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Most of CT is not rural, but suburban. There are, however, some nice rural towns in the NE and NW corners. As someone else put it, it would not be considered rural to one who travels the USA extensively. It's the 3rd most densely populated state, but thanks to strict zoning and lots of trees, one would hardly know it.
 
Old 08-23-2009, 12:24 PM
 
Location: New England
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jp646 View Post
Interesting responses thus far. Personally, I think of MA as more urban because the Boston metro area expands all the way to Worcester. Shrewsbury, which boarders Worcester's eastern edge, is considered a suburb of both Worcester and Boston. CT doesn't really have any area with this many urban/suburban towns clustered together for such a long stretch. I would say, regardless of size, the majority of the state of MA is urban. Agree? Disagree?
Sure it does! From Stamford to Hartford. Just follow the highways on a map and you'll see it. Each "burb" blends into the other such as Milford. Burb of Bport or New haven? Same for Westport. Burb of Norwalk/Stamford or Bport? Meriden. Burb of New Haven or Hartford? lol

What I find different is the landscape. MOST of CT is hilly, even in the river valley. I find Eastern Mass to be pretty flat in comparison. I don't think the topography East of Worcester is very nice.

Here watch this video about our state parks to see what I mean as it goes across the state:

http://u10videos.com/DEP/Parks/CTPar...ks/CTParks.smi
 
Old 08-23-2009, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Live in NY State, (sometimes) work in CT
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If you were to see CT at night from space, you'd see an unbroken (albeit thin, perhaps the width being from the LI Sound to the Merritt Parkway) string of "urban" light from Greenwich to New Haven, then it continues due north in the I-91 corridor through Hartford past the state line to Springfield. The difference between this stretch and the rest of "megalopolis" from Boston to DC is that it's the one major area in the stretch where there's not a city big enough to be "major" like Boston or Philly or Washington, it's just a lot of small to mid-size cities clustered together.

I believe this is actually unique for America (though you are starting to see it to some extent in North Carolina going from Raleigh to Greensboro down to Charlotte), but not for the world. In Germany there's an area called the "Rhein-Ruhr complex" that is not dominated by one single major city but is big enough "clustered" that if it were in America it would have pro sports teams.
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