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Old 02-03-2010, 01:33 PM
 
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Does anyone have info as to what the property taxes are in different counties? Especially New London and Windham counties? And do the property taxes differ from town to town or just county to county? Thanks.
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Old 02-03-2010, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Connecticut
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Connecticut does not have any county level of government. Counties are only geographical designation here, so there are no county taxes. All of the state is divided up into different municipalities so there are no unincorporated areas and no need for another level of government. Taxes do vary from town to town so you should look at the taxes on homes in your price range. Many local real estate agencies post the taxes on properties with their listings. Jay
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Old 02-03-2010, 02:48 PM
 
Location: Connecticut
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Conn doesn't have county taxes. Conn doesn't have any type of county govt. I believe Conn + RI are the only states like this.

You can see mill rates for various towns at this website.
OPM: Mill Rates
Scroll down for the excel or PDF version.

Note some towns have special taxes like fire district tax. Cromwell is one of those towns.

Generally, cities have higher mill rates.
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Old 02-03-2010, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Connecticut
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But mill rates do not tell the entire story. Taxes also depend on assessments and some towns have lwer assessed valaues on homes than others. That is why I suggested to look at the taxes posted on the real estate listings. this will give you a gauge to consider. Jay
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Old 02-03-2010, 05:34 PM
 
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In order to compare tax rates from one town to another you need to look at the equalized mill rate, which reflects how closely assessed values reflect actual market value and when revals occurred (which differs from town to town). A ranking for 2005-2006 is available here. The most expensive places to live tend to have the lowest effective tax rates because they have a very large tax base per capita and fewer social service expenses.
JayCT, you've questioned the validity of equalized tax rates before, so I'm going to refer you to an article here discussing how they're generated and used.
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Old 02-12-2010, 08:26 PM
 
Location: Stamford, CT
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In Fairfield, for example, property taxes are based on (don't laugh too loudly) 70% of October 2005 assessed values. I just found this out in the process of my my recent home purchase. The obvious problem is that Oct '05 was the height of the real estate market. Luckily, town officials have come to their senses (due to public outcry is my guess) and will be re-assessing everyone in the coming months to more accurately reflect the declining market. So I'm hopeful my property taxes plummet as a result of the re-assessment, but I'm not going to hold my breath. If you're worried about property taxes in certain towns, call the town assessors office and ask what the current property taxes are based on and, if you think they don't reflect the current market conditions, ask about the appeal process.
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Old 02-12-2010, 09:17 PM
 
Location: Connecticut
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Don't count on your taxes going down. They rarely do. When they revalue the properties in town, all the property values will go down, not just yours. The only way to make up the difference in money generated will be to raise the mill rate. Also note, that the revaluation is not being done because people are complaining. It is being done because it is the law in Connecticut that they have to be done every 5 years. Jay
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Old 02-13-2010, 06:14 AM
 
Location: New England
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayCT View Post
Don't count on your taxes going down. They rarely do. When they revalue the properties in town, all the property values will go down, not just yours. The only way to make up the difference in money generated will be to raise the mill rate. Also note, that the revaluation is not being done because people are complaining. It is being done because it is the law in Connecticut that they have to be done every 5 years. Jay
Agreed. The town is getting theirs no matter what.
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Old 06-21-2013, 02:32 PM
 
37 posts, read 116,081 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spoklahoma View Post
In Fairfield, for example, property taxes are based on (don't laugh too loudly) 70% of October 2005 assessed values. I just found this out in the process of my my recent home purchase. The obvious problem is that Oct '05 was the height of the real estate market. Luckily, town officials have come to their senses (due to public outcry is my guess) and will be re-assessing everyone in the coming months to more accurately reflect the declining market. So I'm hopeful my property taxes plummet as a result of the re-assessment, but I'm not going to hold my breath. If you're worried about property taxes in certain towns, call the town assessors office and ask what the current property taxes are based on and, if you think they don't reflect the current market conditions, ask about the appeal process.
No, we were reevaluated and if they need more taxes because of the reevaluation of your property showing many of the values went down) they just raise the mill rate again to cover what you need. Happened to us. Good luck. Taxes here and nearby states are very, very high.
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Old 06-23-2013, 12:02 AM
 
Location: Connecticut
24,577 posts, read 40,130,038 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by codydog View Post
No, we were reevaluated and if they need more taxes because of the reevaluation of your property showing many of the values went down) they just raise the mill rate again to cover what you need. Happened to us. Good luck. Taxes here and nearby states are very, very high.
Do you realize that this thread is three years old now? What was posted back then was accurate for then. Jay
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