U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Consumer Electronics
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-06-2012, 10:38 AM
 
Location: Nassau, Long Island, NY
15,734 posts, read 15,971,139 times
Reputation: 6376
Default Question About Connecting Cable Box to TV with HDMI Cable

The screw for the coaxial cable input on my flat screen TV broke in half. I now cannot connect my cable TV box to my TV. When I posted in my local forum asking for TV repair places, someone posted this:

Correct me if I'm wrong but, can't you bypass the coaxial port by using a hdmi cable to connect cable box to tv?

Is this possible? Is the HDMI cable similar to how the coaxial cable is shaped (screw threads on the outside and 1 wire in the center)? Or is there some sort of adapter that can be used? TIA for any information!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-06-2012, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Jenks, Oklahoma
567 posts, read 797,376 times
Reputation: 425
HDMI ports are found on most HDTVs, and is available for use on several HD cable boxes. It provides both the audio and video connection on a single cable.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-06-2012, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Houston
460 posts, read 589,552 times
Reputation: 311
In addition to HDMI, you can also use a TV's analog connection systems (if provided):

* composite video connection (the yellow plug; lowest quality image)

* S-video connection (round plug with several tiny pins; 2nd best quality; these are being phased out but many slightly older TVs and cable boxes have them)

* component video connection (the blue/red/green plugs - this connection method provides the best picture & is the only one capable of transmitting hi-def images i.e. 720 and 1080 line images)

---> None of the connections above include an audio signal, so you will have to transmit the audio signal separately via the TV's red & white audio input plugs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-06-2012, 12:05 PM
 
16,311 posts, read 13,822,066 times
Reputation: 7947
And you will be stunned at the improvement in the picture quality.

If you are using the coax out from your cable box, you are using the absolute worst possible output.

RGB - better
S-Video - better yet
Composite video - better yet
DVI - better yet
HDMI - best.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-06-2012, 12:42 PM
 
8,410 posts, read 8,170,190 times
Reputation: 6424
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asheville Native View Post
And you will be stunned at the improvement in the picture quality.

If you are using the coax out from your cable box, you are using the absolute worst possible output.

RGB - better
S-Video - better yet
Composite video - better yet
DVI - better yet
HDMI - best.

The correct order is:

HDMI-best, plus it carries audio and video on one cable, supports all the latest surround formats, has 2-way communication in some cases, and is the only connection that supports 1080P.

audio plus DVI video-seldom seen on source components for the home user

audio plus component video-used on everything HD before DVI or HDMI was available

audio plus RGB- I'm not positive where this falls in line with the other connections for non-pro gear but it is also seldom seen on modern video gear for the home user.

audio plus S-video-not much better picture quality than composite video, and the S-video connection is a common failure point.

audio plus composite video-most common on non-digital or HD components

coax-welcome to 1980. Mono audio, and video being passed through two tuners. The worst of all connections.

To be completely correct, except for S-video, the connection type isn't the issue. It's where the signal is coming from, how it is processed, and where it ends up on the TV (or the end of the signal path in any case).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-06-2012, 05:03 PM
 
Location: sowf jawja
1,903 posts, read 4,995,998 times
Reputation: 904
Quote:
Originally Posted by vmaxnc View Post
audio plus RGB- I'm not positive where this falls in line with the other connections for non-pro gear but it is also seldom seen on modern video gear for the home user. . . . .
And that's how the movie studios like it. RGB, or what's known as 'component' input, can provide the same resolutions and clarity of HDMI, but its analog, which means no digital copy protection. Some studios have been lobbying for the right to require cable/sat providers to disable the component outputs of their equipment for certain channels, like HBO.



Quote:
Originally Posted by vmaxnc View Post
To be completely correct, except for S-video, the connection type isn't the issue. It's where the signal is coming from, how it is processed, and where it ends up on the TV (or the end of the signal path in any case).
thanks for clarifying that . . . . i was about to make a "correction"!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-06-2012, 06:31 PM
 
Location: God's Gift to Mankind for flying anything
3,335 posts, read 4,580,313 times
Reputation: 2130
My *box* is connected to a modern TV, and has the (in)famous Yellow, Red, White line output and the HDMI output.
Once and a while, when hooked up with the HDMI cable, the warning comes up *Out of Range* ...
Then all I can do is hook it up via the Y,R,W line hook ups.
After a few days or so, I hook it up via the HDMI cable and it is all OK !
Any idea why this is ?

What does *out of range* actually means ?

TIA
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-06-2012, 06:36 PM
 
10,509 posts, read 8,186,712 times
Reputation: 3771
What is the model number and name of the TV?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-06-2012, 06:46 PM
 
10,509 posts, read 8,186,712 times
Reputation: 3771
Quote:
What does *out of range* actually means ?

Your TV doesn't want to auto adjust to the output signal from the cable box. Set your TV to 720 and see if the problem goes away.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-06-2012, 06:55 PM
 
16,311 posts, read 13,822,066 times
Reputation: 7947
Do you subscribe to HDTV through your cable company? Is dependent on which channel you have selected?

When you turn on the TV, does it display the input and resolution briefly?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Consumer Electronics
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:43 AM.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top