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Old 06-29-2012, 08:34 PM
 
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I have a 46 inch Toshiba flat screen and am looking for the best quality picture possible for while watching movies. Currently, I have an average dvd player.

Would a Blue Ray Player be a huge upgrade? Would I notice a difference in the picture quality?
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Old 06-29-2012, 08:52 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dallasguy82 View Post
I have a 46 inch Toshiba flat screen and am looking for the best quality picture possible for while watching movies. Currently, I have an average dvd player.

Would a Blue Ray Player be a huge upgrade? Would I notice a difference in the picture quality?
If you have BD disks. The DVD's you have will look exactly the same. This is assuming your current 'average' DVD player interfaces to the set with HDMI and supports Dolby sound, and progressive scan (480p).

If you bought a DVD/BD movie, such as Avitar, there is a noticeable sharpness to the BD disk over the DVD disk. It may also provide additional functions such as built in WiFi allowing you to stream Netflix or Amazon video's through the BD player.
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Old 06-30-2012, 03:50 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asheville Native View Post
If you have BD disks. The DVD's you have will look exactly the same. This is assuming your current 'average' DVD player interfaces to the set with HDMI and supports Dolby sound, and progressive scan (480p).

If you bought a DVD/BD movie, such as Avitar, there is a noticeable sharpness to the BD disk over the DVD disk. It may also provide additional functions such as built in WiFi allowing you to stream Netflix or Amazon video's through the BD player.
I do not own any movies, I only rent through mail (not streaming).
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Old 06-30-2012, 08:09 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dallasguy82 View Post
I do not own any movies, I only rent through mail (not streaming).
Then you would rent Bluray discs going forward. Or maybe you'd try streaming. Depending on the movie, there can be a big difference in picture quality over regular DVD. Plus Bluray offers surround sound formats that aren't on DVD, if you connect to a surround sound receiver.

The prices are outdated, but the facts are the same:

Blu-ray vs. DVD - Blu-ray: CNET's Quick Guide - CNET Reviews
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Old 06-30-2012, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Diaspora
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It depends on the quality of your Toshiba TV. On 60-120hz you'd barely notice the difference. On 240hz its extremely more noticeable of how more crisp and detailed the picture is. If you do get a bluRay, get one with upconvert and built-in wifi (not wifi ready). I'd recommend a Samsung BDD6500 (has 3D capability if needed) as it is feature rich and you can now find it for below $100 as its been discontinued and replaced with the BDE6500.
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Old 06-30-2012, 01:19 PM
 
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Originally Posted by NeilVA View Post
It depends on the quality of your Toshiba TV. On 60-120hz you'd barely notice the difference. On 240hz its extremely more noticeable of how more crisp and detailed the picture is. If you do get a bluRay, get one with upconvert and built-in wifi (not wifi ready). I'd recommend a Samsung BDD6500 (has 3D capability if needed) as it is feature rich and you can now find it for below $100 as its been discontinued and replaced with the BDE6500.
Can you please explain those statements?
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Old 06-30-2012, 02:38 PM
 
Location: Diaspora
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Quote:
Can you please explain those statements?
Explain what? I have TV's with all three refresh rates. My 240Hz (D7000) Samsung has the best clarity and smoothness than my older 120Hz Toshiba (UX600u) or my 60Hz Sceptre TVs with Blurays attached. This is personal experience. If you want to explain the difference of playing a native 60Hz Bluray player on each, then go for it. So to say it it other words it depends on the quality of the screen and not the nameplate on the front. It matters how the TV processes the signal thus higher end TVs are going to have better electronics.
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Old 06-30-2012, 05:24 PM
 
Location: Western Bexar County
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I buy nothing but Blu-ray DVDs and love the clarity of the movies! Of course, I grew up with black and white tube TVs and no VHS or Beta tape players/recorders.
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Old 06-30-2012, 06:36 PM
 
Location: Arizona
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I bought a TV with a built in Blu-Ray and here is what I have to say about that.
This TV is junk. It irritates me how slow it is, and the discs sometimes get stuck and won't come out (have to stick a card in the side while it's trying to eject).
One thing I didn't understand about blu-rays vs. DVD is that blu-ray is meant to connect to the internet during play. Which I just realized as I'm typing this that my modem is now next to my TV, so now I can connect the TV via ethernet cord, where as before they were in different rooms.
The quality is noticeably nicer IMO! Blu-ray doesn't cost anymore than DVD if you're to buy, and in fact a lot of the blu-rays come with a DVD and a digital copy for the same price as the DVD. We have DVD in the car and the few purchases we've made have been movies for my child, so we have blu-ray in the house, and the DVD in the car. I like that!
One downside of the Blu-Ray. Sometimes with brand new movies the software for the blu-ray disc is more advanced than your player and you'll have to connect to the internet to update your blu-ray player software. We bought Avatar and couldn't watch the whole thing because there wasn't an update available that covered it. Haven't tried playing it again or updating in a long time either, so maybe it will work at this point. And when Harry Potter Deathly Hallows Part 1 came out we bought it.. there was a small part we had to skip in that too cause it wasn't working. Again, there's potentially an update available for my player at this point but my TV hasn't been connected. I have yet to play a blu-ray disc while connected, so I'm not sure how nice the extra features of that are. Other than the quality, I don't care about that extra 'experience' anyways.
So my one recommendation - depending on your setup in your house - is to get a blu-ray not built into a TV, and get one that uses WiFi/wireless.
If you're renting movies, the one setback might be availability of the blu-rays vs. dvd, however the blu-ray plays DVD, so it's not like you're limited to only renting blu-ray at that point.
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Old 07-01-2012, 07:15 AM
 
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Generally speaking the difference is the same you have between SD TV and HD TV. The resolution of both DVD and and SDTV are realtively small compared to HDTV and BluRay, BluRay can take full advantage of a HDTV. This is about what is available for SDTV and is exactly the max resolution of DVD. This image is stretched over the entire size of the display, the larger it gets the fuzzier it gets.




If we were to superimpose that image on the available resolution for HDTV and Blu Ray:







Quote:
Originally Posted by NeilVA View Post
It depends on the quality of your Toshiba TV. On 60-120hz you'd barely notice the difference.
While refresh rate is important you're going to see a vast improvement with even 60hz especially considering the framerate of the video you are watching is only 24/30FPS. The TV we have is 120hz and it looks fabulous.

Last edited by thecoalman; 07-01-2012 at 07:25 AM..
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