U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Consumer Electronics
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-06-2012, 07:16 PM
 
Location: Ohio
3,441 posts, read 5,271,691 times
Reputation: 2678

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by NeilVA View Post
FYI - You do know that Bluray players connect to TVs via an HDMI cable and have absolutly nothing to do with who your cable company is nor their adapter.
Yeah but everything NOT through your bluray is like watching a 1980 TV. If you are inputing the cable signal, same deal, 1980's TV.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-07-2012, 09:08 PM
 
16,308 posts, read 25,264,005 times
Reputation: 8302
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeilVA View Post
I have Comcast and nothing comes through the cable to the TV without it. It is supposed to be only connected to TV's that do not have a cable box. It is used to count the TVs in your home so they know who is draining signal in an area. Its not an upgrade as its supposed to give you the basic OTA channels for your area. In reality its a downgrade. Since we had to install them about two years ago and we went from 60 channels w/o a cable box to 10 with this adapter.
Sounds like Comcast has decided it is better to **** off paying customers to thwart a few that steal cable. I would not be paying for downgraded service, I would be shopping for alternatives.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-07-2012, 10:23 PM
 
40,212 posts, read 41,799,403 times
Reputation: 16754
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asheville Native View Post
Sounds like Comcast has decided it is better to **** off paying customers to thwart a few that steal cable.
No, the switch to all digital is to maximize the usage of the bandwidth,
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2012, 09:28 PM
 
16,308 posts, read 25,264,005 times
Reputation: 8302
Actually I'm beginning to suspect that the whole story hasn't been made apparent. Apparently this mandatory dongle is only for older analog sets, and is a DTA that converts digital TV to analog for older sets, and unnecessary if the set has a Digital ATSC tuner.

Even so, to only provide 10 channels as basic cable is lame if indeed accurate, kinda like the type of service cable provided in the 70's.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2012, 12:30 AM
Bo Bo won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Tenth Edition (Apr-May 2014). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Ohio
16,897 posts, read 33,634,159 times
Reputation: 13858
The law requiring cable providers to carry analog channels, tunable without a converter lapsed back in 2011. More of them will be doing this.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2012, 10:37 AM
 
16,308 posts, read 25,264,005 times
Reputation: 8302
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bo View Post
The law requiring cable providers to carry analog channels, tunable without a converter lapsed back in 2011. More of them will be doing this.
Or provide an alternative, a DTV box, for it appears Comcast is dropping all analog channels in some of their markets.

Comcast sets final phase of digital migration
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2012, 11:28 AM
 
40,212 posts, read 41,799,403 times
Reputation: 16754
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asheville Native View Post
Even so, to only provide 10 channels as basic cable is lame if indeed accurate, kinda like the type of service cable provided in the 70's.
That would depend on the Comcast plan, they do have a really basic plan that just covers the local channels and few others. That might be your only option if you can't get reception for OTA channels. It's really cheap like $10 or $20 month.

I don't know exactly what it goes up to because I don't watch that TV but it gets something like 100 channels if you have a regular basic cable plan.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-14-2012, 08:30 PM
 
614 posts, read 1,147,299 times
Reputation: 485
The truth is that the main reason Comcast is doing this is to gain the use of more cable bandwidth (for selling phone, internet, on-demand video, etc) without wiring another run of coaxial cable to all of their customers. The small boxes receive the QAM digital signals carried on their cables - which allow several - perhaps a dozen or more - TV channels on the bandwidth of a single 6 MHz channel, and convert them to analog NTSC signals for basic cable on older sets. These small boxes are not unlike the converter boxes used for watching digital television with an antenna on an older TV set (only the OTA boxes are ATSC and are not compatible with cable's QAM). The larger boxes will receive the HD programs and send them in HDMI to newer sets, provide on demand, pay-per-view and subscription services, and count the usage (especially for PPV viewing).

However, they are also obviously smiling at the fact that the transition makes bootleg cable hookups useless, especially important to them, with the increasing cost of cable far outpacing inflation. It also stops people from using a VCR to time-shift a program unless they can get a second converter for the VCR, or rent a DVR

AFAIK, NO cable system in the US is providing signals for ATSC tuners. Cable systems are using the QAM technology, allowing more programming streams in a given bandwidth than ATSC allows (OTA uses ATSC because less transmitter power is needed, and because it is the mandated standard).

While some TV sets have both ATSC and QAM capability, many cable systems still require an external box even for sets with a QAM tuner, since they can encrypt the QAM signals they send on their cables.

Comcast is phasing in digital-only cable gradually across the country (they call it "Project Cavalry"), but some cable companies are also doing the same thing. Keep in mind that small-antenna satellite providers have always been digital-only, encrypting every channel, and with a box required for every set.

If you don't like the picture quality, you may have options. Hook the small cable box to the TV via the A/V jacks (yellow, white, red) instead of coaxial cable, and an antenna to the antenna jack of your HDTV instead. In most cases, you'll get excellent HD from your local stations for free, and you may get some channels your cable provider won't offer you at any price. You also will have a backup in case your cable goes out for any reason.

Last edited by 313 TUxedo; 07-14-2012 at 08:40 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-15-2012, 10:02 PM
 
Location: Diaspora
21,540 posts, read 24,674,751 times
Reputation: 8930
Quote:
I would not be paying for downgraded service, I would be shopping for alternatives.
In numerous areas around the country there are none. We have a choice of Comcast or a Dish. And if I want a Dish, I need someone to climb a 100ft tree to utilize it as I don't have enough sky to use one from the ground or the top of the house. My neighbor has basic cable plus internet on Comcast and he pays $158/mo
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-15-2012, 10:05 PM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
7,653 posts, read 15,576,054 times
Reputation: 6677
Quote:
Originally Posted by 313 TUxedo View Post
The truth is that the main reason Comcast is doing this is to gain the use of more cable bandwidth (for selling phone, internet, on-demand video, etc) without wiring another run of coaxial cable to all of their customers. The small boxes receive the QAM digital signals carried on their cables - which allow several - perhaps a dozen or more - TV channels on the bandwidth of a single 6 MHz channel, and convert them to analog NTSC signals for basic cable on older sets. These small boxes are not unlike the converter boxes used for watching digital television with an antenna on an older TV set (only the OTA boxes are ATSC and are not compatible with cable's QAM). The larger boxes will receive the HD programs and send them in HDMI to newer sets, provide on demand, pay-per-view and subscription services, and count the usage (especially for PPV viewing).

However, they are also obviously smiling at the fact that the transition makes bootleg cable hookups useless, especially important to them, with the increasing cost of cable far outpacing inflation. It also stops people from using a VCR to time-shift a program unless they can get a second converter for the VCR, or rent a DVR

AFAIK, NO cable system in the US is providing signals for ATSC tuners. Cable systems are using the QAM technology, allowing more programming streams in a given bandwidth than ATSC allows (OTA uses ATSC because less transmitter power is needed, and because it is the mandated standard).

While some TV sets have both ATSC and QAM capability, many cable systems still require an external box even for sets with a QAM tuner, since they can encrypt the QAM signals they send on their cables.

Comcast is phasing in digital-only cable gradually across the country (they call it "Project Cavalry"), but some cable companies are also doing the same thing. Keep in mind that small-antenna satellite providers have always been digital-only, encrypting every channel, and with a box required for every set.

If you don't like the picture quality, you may have options. Hook the small cable box to the TV via the A/V jacks (yellow, white, red) instead of coaxial cable, and an antenna to the antenna jack of your HDTV instead. In most cases, you'll get excellent HD from your local stations for free, and you may get some channels your cable provider won't offer you at any price. You also will have a backup in case your cable goes out for any reason.
My old roommate bought a small LCD TV that received both ATSC and QAM. He had it set up to access only the basic analog cable line-up, but I scanned in some unencrypted QAM channels, generally local stations. These were numbered "114-1, 114-2", etc.

When tuners capable of QAM first came out, cable providers often did not encrypt video-on-demand, which was sent on "secret" QAM channels that nonetheless QAM tuners could scan and receive.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Consumer Electronics
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:52 PM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top