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Old 01-12-2016, 09:10 PM
 
Location: Sarasota FL
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I have DISH and a 211k receiver. The only time I get pixilation is when a medium/severe rain storm is approaching from the southwest. But I think the receiver is programmed to not show pix/freeze on the TV and immediately goes to the 'signal lost' screen.
I also have an antenna because DISH does not carry sub-stations and in my area there are many of them. What is odd is that I get pix/freeze on only one station. This station transmits from a tower shared by other stations that there's no problem receiving. Although the prime is Spanish, they also carry Bounce, Gettv and Escape as subs.
Does the FCC decide and grant how much power a station can transmit? If it's lower power than the other channels, would that cause pic freeze/pixelation? Would and amplifier boost the signal but also cuse too much gain for the other channels?
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Old 01-15-2016, 05:42 PM
 
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Originally Posted by d4g4m View Post
Does the FCC decide and grant how much power a station can transmit?
Someone had mentioned they can use lower power with the digital and many stations underestimated the amount of power they needed.
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Old 01-15-2016, 06:16 PM
 
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Pixelation is observed when the pixels are resized to a size that you can see with your naked eye. A common scenario is when you watch a DVD on a modern TV The DVD has to be scaled up to about 22 times the size.... causing a pixel from the DVD video to take up approximately 22 pixels on a modern TV. Depending on the size of the TV, you can see the actual pixels caused by pixelation.
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Old 01-16-2016, 12:20 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Mr.Hospitality View Post
Pixelation is observed when the pixels are resized to a size that you can see with your naked eye. A common scenario is when you watch a DVD on a modern TV The DVD has to be scaled up to about 22 times the size.... causing a pixel from the DVD video to take up approximately 22 pixels on a modern TV. Depending on the size of the TV, you can see the actual pixels caused by pixelation.
That may be one definition but what they are referring to here is corruption of the stream of data. This can result in large blocks of the same color, it really depends on what the player defaults too.

DVD is 720*480 so for a 1080p TV an anamorphic 16:9 pixel would get stretched out to about a 3*2 pixel area on the 1080p. That said you shouldn't be seeing blocks especially if the player or TV has upscaling technology.
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Old 01-16-2016, 01:45 AM
 
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Originally Posted by thecoalman View Post
That may be one definition but what they are referring to here is corruption of the stream of data. This can result in large blocks of the same color, it really depends on what the player defaults too.

DVD is 720*480 so for a 1080p TV an anamorphic 16:9 pixel would get stretched out to about a 3*2 pixel area on the 1080p. That said you shouldn't be seeing blocks especially if the player or TV has upscaling technology.
That's not pixelation. What you're referring to is called macroblocking which is often compared with pixelation but inherently different.
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Old 01-16-2016, 10:16 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Mr.Hospitality View Post
That's not pixelation. What you're referring to is called macroblocking which is often compared with pixelation but inherently different.
I'm well aware of the terminology, a macroblock typically is not associated with data loss but instead artifacts caused by over compression or newbies recompressing already compressed video. Compressed video resuses information from previous frames, if the bitrate is too low the encoder cannot compensate for the changes and will produce macroblocks.


The following example illustrates this very well because the lights are moving very fast. This is interlaced so it's two frames combined, the split between the lights is actually the same beam 1/60th of a second difference to give you an idea of how fast they are moving.



The DV source:




Compressed to 3000kbps MPEG2:



Compressed to 8000kbps MEG2 and then recompressed too 3000kbps.
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Old 01-16-2016, 03:39 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thecoalman View Post
I'm well aware of the terminology, a macroblock typically is not associated with data loss but instead artifacts caused by over compression or newbies recompressing already compressed video. Compressed video resuses information from previous frames, if the bitrate is too low the encoder cannot compensate for the changes and will produce macroblocks.


The following example illustrates this very well because the lights are moving very fast. This is interlaced so it's two frames combined, the split between the lights is actually the same beam 1/60th of a second difference to give you an idea of how fast they are moving.



The DV source:




Compressed to 3000kbps MPEG2:



Compressed to 8000kbps MEG2 and then recompressed too 3000kbps.
Actually, macroblocking is often used in reference to where there is an interruption in the data stream.

But that was not the point of my post. I think we both agree that you were previously incorrect in defining pixelation in that pixelation is not related to an interruption in the data stream, but rather with resizing of bitmaps (or in the case of a video, a series of bitmaps).
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Old 01-16-2016, 03:42 PM
 
980 posts, read 595,551 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thecoalman View Post
DVD is 720*480 so for a 1080p TV an anamorphic 16:9 pixel would get stretched out to about a 3*2 pixel area on the 1080p. That said you shouldn't be seeing blocks especially if the player or TV has upscaling technology.
For a DVD to 1080p, you're going to see a 6x interpolation (as you described). I was referring to a typical modern tv with the resolution of 3840×2160.
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Old 01-17-2016, 08:26 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Mr.Hospitality View Post
I think we both agree that you were previously incorrect in defining pixelation in that pixelation ...
I never defined it as anything.
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