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Old 09-10-2012, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
7,653 posts, read 15,571,390 times
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4K is the successor to HDTV. While HDTV provides a maximum resolution of 1920 x 1080 (about 2 megapixels), 4K is 3840 x 2160, or 8.3 megapixels. That means that four "1080" HD images can fit into one 4K screen.

Consumer 4K equipment is just beginning to come out.

> Choice of displays will expand beginning this fall.

>> Currently, Sony has the VPL-VW1000ES ($25,000) front projector, which has a native resolution of 4096 x 2160.

>> The 152" Panasonic TH-152UX1 ($500,000) is also available and also has a glasses-less 3D display.

>> Several professional monitors and projectors in the $50,000 - $100,000 range are also available.

> As for content, there are few options other than watching upscaled 1080p. You'll need a meaty processor and graphics card (or a couple of them) for the PC-based solutions.

>> YouTube has a selection of 4K videos to stream. (For example,
Creating Content for the iPad (shot in 4K) - YouTube )

>> Digital camera pictures

>> Some computer games could potentially run at 3840 x 2160. I'm guessing for the newer ones you'd need two or four top-flight nVidias working in tandem to sustain a proper frame rate.

>> The 4K Timescapes documentary ( World's first 4K film you can actually buy - Crave - TVs - CNET Asia ), which ships on its own hard drive for $300

>> Output from such 4K video cameras as the RED models, or this prosumer one: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc..._Handheld.html

>> A few movie trailers.

>> If you're in Europe, test transmissions from Ultra HDTV on the Astra satellite.

Higher-order modulation techniques (such as 16AFSK and 32AFSK) should make 4K video streams take up less spectrum, hence making satellite distribution reasonable. Remember, in the analog days, a single channel of (SD) analog video took up an entire transponder.

Last edited by tvdxer; 09-10-2012 at 12:49 PM..
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Old 09-10-2012, 01:21 PM
 
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I thought this was gonna be about televisions that cost four thousand dollars.
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Old 09-11-2012, 12:38 AM
 
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I wouldn't expect to see these anytime in the immediate future, HDTV provides a a very big leap in technology. So much so that it's about all you need unless you have a huge sized TV in your house. When I say huge I mean like 5 feet across. The human eye can only detect so much detail and that much resolution isn't going to provide a lot of benefit considering the average viewing distance and the size of the TV. It's like CD, there was better formats after that but there was no "wow" factor. Ironically many of the download services are actually a step back in quality.
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Old 09-11-2012, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
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I think 4K HD will have minimal real world impact for a long time. American consumers have only so much appetite for change. Although we seem to buy TVs more often than we did 20 years ago, I think most consumers with a bit of income have bought 1080p TVs in the last few years and are in no mood to buy again. Blu-ray is not entrenched yet, and streaming is common, but barely HD. And streaming 4K HD will demand even more bandwidth than most have at home.
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Old 09-11-2012, 03:03 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
11,814 posts, read 13,951,598 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gimme3steps View Post
I thought this was gonna be about televisions that cost four thousand dollars.
Me too. I thought the price of OLED TV had come down...

LG's 55-inch OLED TV enters the third dimension, we slide on our glasses (hands-on video) -- Engadget
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Old 09-11-2012, 08:58 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
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Heck, I only paid $525 for my 46" LED and I can't imagine needing anything bigger or with any higher quality picture.
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Old 09-17-2012, 06:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
Heck, I only paid $525 for my 46" LED and I can't imagine needing anything bigger or with any higher quality picture.

With all do respect, you bought an LCD with LED backlighting. A true LED tv at that size would cost thousands.
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Old 09-17-2012, 06:53 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
Heck, I only paid $525 for my 46" LED and I can't imagine needing anything bigger or with any higher quality picture.
People that sit farther away from their TV than you do or want a more theater like experience, and/or prefer top tier products, would disagree with you.

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Old 09-17-2012, 10:41 PM
 
40,161 posts, read 41,766,549 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vmaxnc View Post
People that sit farther away from their TV than you do or want a more theater like experience, and/or prefer top tier products, would disagree with you.

The farther you sit away the less resolution you need. The human eye can process something like 250DPI at a standard viewing distance which is how far you might hold a photograph away. If you were looking at two images at this distance where one was printed at 600DPI and the other was 250DPI you wouldn't see a difference, it's only if you brought the images closer that the one with 600DPI would begin to show more detail.

Having said that you would certainly see a difference between regualr HD and one of these TV's even sitting far away as long as the TV was large. As I said above I wouldn't expect to see them any time soon except for maybe in computer displays. I'm not so sure there will enough WOW! factor to drive sales and of course there are other issues like actually having a source video that can utilize all that resolution. Cable still hasn't caught up with HD yet and they have limited bandwidth.

If I were to take a guess tech like this won't be standard for another 15 years.
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Old 09-19-2012, 02:26 PM
 
8,402 posts, read 20,657,715 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thecoalman View Post
The farther you sit away the less resolution you need. The human eye can process something like 250DPI at a standard viewing distance which is how far you might hold a photograph away. If you were looking at two images at this distance where one was printed at 600DPI and the other was 250DPI you wouldn't see a difference, it's only if you brought the images closer that the one with 600DPI would begin to show more detail.

Having said that you would certainly see a difference between regualr HD and one of these TV's even sitting far away as long as the TV was large. As I said above I wouldn't expect to see them any time soon except for maybe in computer displays. I'm not so sure there will enough WOW! factor to drive sales and of course there are other issues like actually having a source video that can utilize all that resolution. Cable still hasn't caught up with HD yet and they have limited bandwidth.

If I were to take a guess tech like this won't be standard for another 15 years.
The farther away you sit the larger screen size you need, is the point. And going with lesser model TVs also means the loss of other enhancements and features.


Skip the 4K, go straight to 8K:


8K by 4K or Octo HD - the real SUHDTV technology
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