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Old 09-25-2012, 03:44 PM
 
Location: Colorado
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I'm probably opening a can of worms here but what is the difference between a TV that is LCD, LED and Plasma? I mean what are the technical differences and what are the pros and cons of each?

Remember I barely understand the difference between analog and digital so please keep your answers real simple
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Old 09-25-2012, 03:53 PM
 
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With all due respect, do a search. There are dozens of threads here, not to mention literally millions of web pages, that will tell you exactly what you want to know.
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Old 09-25-2012, 03:57 PM
 
Location: Colorado
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vmaxnc View Post
With all due respect, do a search. There are dozens of threads here, not to mention literally millions of web pages, that will tell you exactly what you want to know.
But I don't understand them

Thanks for your help
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Old 09-25-2012, 04:05 PM
 
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Try this-

LCD Vs. LED Vs. Plasma
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Old 09-25-2012, 04:31 PM
 
Location: Texas State Fair
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Go to an electronics store and ask the salesman to show you one of each. Decide which looks best to you. Can you afford it? Unless you need to satisfy some specific requirement, that's about all that matters.
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Old 09-25-2012, 05:15 PM
 
Location: Jenks, Oklahoma
620 posts, read 1,533,295 times
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Originally Posted by chilaili View Post
But I don't understand them

Thanks for your help
Your profile shows you have a Master's Degree. You should get your tuition money back.
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Old 09-26-2012, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tofurkey View Post
Go to an electronics store and ask the salesman to show you one of each. Decide which looks best to you. Can you afford it? Unless you need to satisfy some specific requirement, that's about all that matters.
Bad idea. I think the majority of sales people at stores like Best Buy do not understand the technology. And buying a TV based on how it looks in the showroom is not certain to result in the best picture. TVs that look great in a showroom often are over-bright at home with too much contrast and pumped up colors.
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Old 09-26-2012, 09:54 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hoffdano View Post
Bad idea. I think the majority of sales people at stores like Best Buy do not understand the technology. And buying a TV based on how it looks in the showroom is not certain to result in the best picture. TVs that look great in a showroom often are over-bright at home with too much contrast and pumped up colors.
Best Buy doesn't have salespeople. They have slightly trained clerks. And it may come as a surprise that there are other places to shop which are far more helpful than stores like BB could ever be.

I agree, though, that TVs in showrooms aren't adjusted for home use. The reason is that most people have been conditioned to think brighter is better, so without someone to correct that misconception and explain how a TV should look (at a more advanced AV retailer, for example), brightness sells TVs. Even in showrooms that have darker TV viewing areas, the TVs are usually too bright.

My neighbor is a good example of this common shopper type. She has a huge LCD, much too big for the room, and it's so bright I can't stand to watch it for more than a few minutes. But she has commented several times on how dark my calibrated Panasonic plasma is. Even after some explanation and watching it for a while, she still thinks there is something wrong with mine.

Then again, she thinks Bose is the pinnacle of audio quality. That's another mindset that comes from years of conditioning.
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Old 09-26-2012, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
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I'll try an explanation of LCD vs. LED vs. plasma.

LCD:

These TVs start with a white fluorescent light (the "backlight"). Very small liquid crystals act as shutters to let light through. The liquid crystals are arranged in groups of three (creating a pixel) to let red, green, blue (each individual color is a "subpixel") light through. To produce "white" all the liquid crystals are open to let light through. To produce "black" all the liquid crystals are turned off to block the backlight. The liquid crystals are turned on and off at high speed to let varying amounts of RGB light through to build a picture.

LED:

Exactly the same principle as LCD TVs except the backlight is a grid of LEDs instead of flourescent. Still uses a grid of liquid crystals. LEDs use a bit less energy, allows a thinner TV, and may be brighter. The grid of LEDs is sometimes manipulated electronically to vary the brightness (the regular LCD backlight is always on at a consistent level). Some LED TVs put the LEDs at the side of the panel instead of behind the LCD panel. This allows an even thinner panel.

Plasma:

The RGB "subpixels" are actively illuminated by a tiny cell containing a gas. To produce "white" each subpixel is lit. To produce "black" each subpixel is off. Plasma TVs use more electricity and are a bit thicker (but still thin).

The end result in terms of picture:

- Remember that LED TVs are LCD TVs with an LED backlight.
- LCD and LED TVs have some difficulty producing a true "black" because even when the liquid crystals are turned off some light leaks through between each subpixel. Some LCD TVs produce a dark gray instead of a real black.
- LED TVs that manipulate the LED grid ("local dimming") can produce better (darker) black because they can dim the LEDs in a dark area which reduces the negative effect of light leakage.
- LED and LCD TVs can produce a very bright picture.
- LED and LCD TVs almost always show a worse picture when viewed from an angle. That is because the backlight is behind the LCD panel, which means you see light through the adjacent pixel instead of the intended one.
- LED and LCD TVs sometimes suffer from "lag" because the liquid crystals don't change from "on" to "off" state fast enough. That causes the image to blur or smear when the image is moving very fast. That's why 120 Hz refresh (vs. the 60 Hz that was common a few years ago) is important.
- Plasma TVs generally produce very good black levels, which increases effective contrast.
- Plasma TVs do not have a problem changing state quickly.
- Plasma TVs are not as bright because they just can't make each pixel light up as much as the backlight of an LCD or LED TV.
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Old 09-26-2012, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
13,720 posts, read 25,904,706 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vmaxnc View Post
Best Buy doesn't have salespeople. They have slightly trained clerks. And it may come as a surprise that there are other places to shop which are far more helpful than stores like BB could ever be.
I agree there are better places to shop. But in most cities there are very few places other than "serious" A/V stores where the help is knowledgeable. And the typical shopper doesn't even know where these stores are - nor are willing to pay the prices.
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