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Old 11-24-2012, 07:06 PM
 
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Thanks guys. But I have one last question. My mother watches the TV from a 35-40 degree angle. Is this an angle significant enough for me to go with the LCD? I have heard that the LCD is the best for viewing at an angle. Other TVs are better for viewing straight on. I am leaning towards the LED, but if this angle will be that significant of an issue where she would have to angle the TV somehow on a narrow table, I will go with the LCD. Thanks again.
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Old 11-24-2012, 09:18 PM
 
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From LCD TV Buying Guide: LCD TV Misconceptions: Six Common Myths About LCD Television Displays

Misconception #4: You can't watch an LCD TV from the side.

This is a source of constant carping for LCD aficionados—limited viewing angles. It is sometimes the case that LCD displays have impaired side-viewing angles. Of course, most manufacturers will tell you just the opposite, that LCD TVs have viewing angles to rival comparably-sized plasma displays (i.e., 160° or more). But this is simply not the case. While it is sometimes possible to view LCD televisions 80° off axis, the picture you'll see will be degraded. In other words, there will be a noticeable decrease in color saturation, contrast, and brightness in the picture.
Quality really makes a difference in terms of viewing angle: If you buy an LCD display from one of the better manufacturers (e.g., Sharp or Sony), you should be able to sit about 70° off axis and still see a perfectly displayed imaged. Dot pitch is an important factor here. Higher dot pitches increase the viewing angles of LCD panels. Since dot pitch is measure in millimeters (mm), a good rule of thumb is this: Smaller dot pitches make for sharper images. You generally want a dot pitch of .28mm ("10,000 pixels/in2 of your display) or finer.
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Old 11-25-2012, 11:39 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
From LCD TV Buying Guide: LCD TV Misconceptions: Six Common Myths About LCD Television Displays

Misconception #4: You can't watch an LCD TV from the side.

This is a source of constant carping for LCD aficionados—limited viewing angles. It is sometimes the case that LCD displays have impaired side-viewing angles. Of course, most manufacturers will tell you just the opposite, that LCD TVs have viewing angles to rival comparably-sized plasma displays (i.e., 160° or more). But this is simply not the case. While it is sometimes possible to view LCD televisions 80° off axis, the picture you'll see will be degraded. In other words, there will be a noticeable decrease in color saturation, contrast, and brightness in the picture.
Quality really makes a difference in terms of viewing angle: If you buy an LCD display from one of the better manufacturers (e.g., Sharp or Sony), you should be able to sit about 70° off axis and still see a perfectly displayed imaged. Dot pitch is an important factor here. Higher dot pitches increase the viewing angles of LCD panels. Since dot pitch is measure in millimeters (mm), a good rule of thumb is this: Smaller dot pitches make for sharper images. You generally want a dot pitch of .28mm ("10,000 pixels/in2 of your display) or finer...
...but the best way to tell is to watch the TV from the same distance and angle in which it would be viewed in the home. Simple as that.
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Old 11-25-2012, 01:29 PM
 
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You'll get no argument from me, but I wonder if it will be possible for the OP.
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Old 11-25-2012, 03:21 PM
 
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Originally Posted by vmaxnc View Post
...but the best way to tell is to watch the TV from the same distance and angle in which it would be viewed in the home. Simple as that.
I am confined to a wheelchair. I can't even transfer into a car, for a while I was doing that with a slide board that eventually caused me to develop a large wound on my rear. So basically, without special medical transportation, I am confined to the home. That is why I am posting this question in here and not visiting Best Buy.
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Old 11-25-2012, 03:28 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
From LCD TV Buying Guide: LCD TV Misconceptions: Six Common Myths About LCD Television Displays

Misconception #4: You can't watch an LCD TV from the side.

This is a source of constant carping for LCD aficionados—limited viewing angles. It is sometimes the case that LCD displays have impaired side-viewing angles. Of course, most manufacturers will tell you just the opposite, that LCD TVs have viewing angles to rival comparably-sized plasma displays (i.e., 160° or more). But this is simply not the case. While it is sometimes possible to view LCD televisions 80° off axis, the picture you'll see will be degraded. In other words, there will be a noticeable decrease in color saturation, contrast, and brightness in the picture.
Quality really makes a difference in terms of viewing angle: If you buy an LCD display from one of the better manufacturers (e.g., Sharp or Sony), you should be able to sit about 70° off axis and still see a perfectly displayed imaged. Dot pitch is an important factor here. Higher dot pitches increase the viewing angles of LCD panels. Since dot pitch is measure in millimeters (mm), a good rule of thumb is this: Smaller dot pitches make for sharper images. You generally want a dot pitch of .28mm ("10,000 pixels/in2 of your display) or finer.
That answers my final question! Thanks for your input. I will look at the dot pitch, but I guess I have nothing to worry about. My mother is not watching the TV from anymore than 40 degrees off axis, if that. Now it is just a matter of going online to look at the specs and balancing it with the price!
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Old 11-25-2012, 03:59 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
You'll get no argument from me, but I wonder if it will be possible for the OP.
Quote:
Originally Posted by lentzr View Post
I am confined to a wheelchair. I can't even transfer into a car, for a while I was doing that with a slide board that eventually caused me to develop a large wound on my rear. So basically, without special medical transportation, I am confined to the home. That is why I am posting this question in here and not visiting Best Buy.
I saw that when I skimmed this thread a couple days ago, then forgot all that when I replied today. Good luck with your TV search.
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Old 11-25-2012, 04:13 PM
 
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Thanks Vmaxnc. I know that any TV that has been discussed in here would be a major improvement from my mother's 20 year old CRT TV with only 19 inches. There is no way around that unless I buy a real piece of junk. Anyway, this is my mother who we are dealing with and she has been VERY supportive and not just during my recent health problems. Hence, I do want the best for what I can afford, especially for a wonderful woman like that!
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Old 11-25-2012, 04:45 PM
 
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I think that I am going to go with the Samsung 32 inch LED with 720p. I do not think that the extra 1080p will be visible on only a 32 inch. The 40 inch screens are simply too expensive for me...there is no way around that right now with my health problems. So I will stick with the 32 inch. This TV has gotten good reviews as one of the best but still affordable HDTV. No it is not the 50 inch plasma HDTV that I would love to get my mother (I simply can't yet), but it would still be a big improvement over the outdated TV she is using now. Thanks for the advice and links! I owe you guys one.
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Old 11-25-2012, 06:51 PM
 
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That's the one I bought. No complaints.
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