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Old 11-25-2012, 10:41 PM
 
Location: Baker City, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jean71 View Post
Wrong. 720p or 1080i is the highest upconverted image for DVD. NOT 1080p.
.......
Sounds like you might have older components.

Newer video components will convert DVD up to 1080p. Components I have that will do it: DVD player, Blu-ray player, AV receiver, 2 different video projectors.
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Old 11-25-2012, 11:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by karlsch View Post
Sounds like you might have older components.

Newer video components will convert DVD up to 1080p. Components I have that will do it: DVD player, Blu-ray player, AV receiver, 2 different video projectors.
Just had to look it up. I guess you are right. However a 1080p blu-ray will produce a better picture than a upscaled 1080p DVD. The player cannot simply add what isn't there.
So I don't really get how they can call it 1080p. Its probably more like 1080i.

Rather misleading advertising if you ask me.

Last edited by Jean71; 11-25-2012 at 11:51 PM..
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Old 11-26-2012, 12:02 AM
 
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Wow. Learning a lot on this blu ray technology. Not going to get into the technology of why the following resolutions are better than each other, but it would be safe for me to acknowledge the following:

1080p = Best audio & picture available in blu ray
1080i = Slightly better than 720p (highest upconverted dvd)
720p = Slightly lower than 1080i (highest upconverted dvd)

I guess what determines the 1080i or 720p upconverstion is the TV or blu ray player?

Cable/Satellite HD signals are only 720p, which I guess gets upconverted to 1080i on my LED 1080p TV?

The resolution playing a standard DVD on my CRT TV had a resolution of 480p
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Old 11-26-2012, 12:07 AM
 
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I found this answer which is easy for me to understand. Not too technical.

1080P is the best right now. 1080i interlaces the lines at 30 frames per second while 1080p is progressive at 60 frames per second.
Interlacing means that the TV is producing the picture every other line, once it hits the bottom, it starts with the 2nd line and goes though each of the other lines, and it does this at 30hz(frame rate)
Progressive does each line by line. So it does every single line in a row at 60hz.

So 1080P gives you the best picture. 1080P content you get from some video games and Blu-Ray movies. 1080i is the best you get from your cable or satellite service, even though they are starting to say they are providing On Demand programming that is 1080P, but all your regular stations broadcast 1080i. But it would be best to get a 1080P TV:

1. Because they are getting so much cheaper.
2. You get the best picture, and if you do get a blu-ray player, you will get 1080p.
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Old 11-26-2012, 02:31 AM
 
3,040 posts, read 2,223,647 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chgodon View Post
Wow. Learning a lot on this blu ray technology. Not going to get into the technology of why the following resolutions are better than each other, but it would be safe for me to acknowledge the following:

1080p = Best audio & picture available in blu ray
1080i = Slightly better than 720p (highest upconverted dvd)
720p = Slightly lower than 1080i (highest upconverted dvd)

I guess what determines the 1080i or 720p upconverstion is the TV or blu ray player?

Cable/Satellite HD signals are only 720p, which I guess gets upconverted to 1080i on my LED 1080p TV?

The resolution playing a standard DVD on my CRT TV had a resolution of 480p
Correct. Looks like you've done quite a bit of research.

I don't believe TVs can upconvert, though I could be wrong. Only DVD and Blu-ray players as far as I know since the disc reader is what 'fills in the blanks' if you will. So the best you'll get from cable/satellite is 720p/1080i.

Standard TV and DVD is 480p. And I if I remember correctly, when TV was still broadcast in analog, it was 480i. Even the early digital was 480i I think which is why the picture on LCDs looked blotchy compared to CRT picture quality.
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Old 11-26-2012, 02:44 AM
 
3,040 posts, read 2,223,647 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chgodon View Post
I found this answer which is easy for me to understand. Not too technical.

1080P is the best right now. 1080i interlaces the lines at 30 frames per second while 1080p is progressive at 60 frames per second.
Interlacing means that the TV is producing the picture every other line, once it hits the bottom, it starts with the 2nd line and goes though each of the other lines, and it does this at 30hz(frame rate)
Progressive does each line by line. So it does every single line in a row at 60hz.

So 1080P gives you the best picture. 1080P content you get from some video games and Blu-Ray movies. 1080i is the best you get from your cable or satellite service, even though they are starting to say they are providing On Demand programming that is 1080P, but all your regular stations broadcast 1080i. But it would be best to get a 1080P TV:

1. Because they are getting so much cheaper.
2. You get the best picture, and if you do get a blu-ray player, you will get 1080p.
Good summary.
This also pretty much explains why 720p is good enough for screens 37inch and smaller. Once you start going bigger with a 720p TV, the image starts getting 'washed out'
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Old 11-26-2012, 02:57 AM
 
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The next resolution 2160p, is what is now commonly being referred to as 4k.
The TVs are still damn expensive though and theres pretty much no compatible content available yet.

The picture is supposed to be amazing though.

Even the next gen screen(OLED) in 1080p is supposed to make a night and day difference. They too are crazy expensive though.

So a OLED 4k T.V in the future once they combine the two, should be something incredible.
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Old 11-26-2012, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
13,720 posts, read 25,904,706 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jean71 View Post
I don't believe TVs can upconvert, though I could be wrong. Only DVD and Blu-ray players as far as I know since the disc reader is what 'fills in the blanks' if you will. So the best you'll get from cable/satellite is 720p/1080i.

Standard TV and DVD is 480p. And I if I remember correctly, when TV was still broadcast in analog, it was 480i. Even the early digital was 480i I think which is why the picture on LCDs looked blotchy compared to CRT picture quality.
I think you are mistaken. Most TVs today have video upconversion or scaling. It is hardly mentioned anymore though because it is standard.

Read the review of the Samsung plasma at the link below. On page 2 it specifically talks about video upscaling.

"Processing was generally good, with solid video upconversion and minimal jaggies on synthetic tests (like the rotating bar on the HQV Benchmark Blu-ray) and real-world DVD movies. The TV was able to pick up the 3:2 sequence with both 480i- and 1080i format programs. High-def deinterlacing performance wasn’t quite as good, with some small jaggies visible on the rotating bar test from the Spears & Munsil test Blu-ray, as well as on the rigging during that disc’s Ship test. I’d give it an A- for SD processing performance, and maybe a B for HD."

Test Report: Samsung PN59D8000 3D Plasma HDTV | Sound and Vision Magazine
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Old 11-26-2012, 01:08 PM
 
3,040 posts, read 2,223,647 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hoffdano View Post
I think you are mistaken. Most TVs today have video upconversion or scaling. It is hardly mentioned anymore though because it is standard.
Thanks for correcting me on that.
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Old 11-26-2012, 07:34 PM
 
40,212 posts, read 41,799,403 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jean71 View Post

Standard TV and DVD is 480p.
480i , ideally any source material is interlaced for SD TV but since no commercial movies are shot in 30FPS interlaced that is impossible. They use a method called 3:2 pull down to get 24FPS material onto 30FPS DVD.

If you have progressive scan DVD player and TV that can accept progressive video it can undo the 3:2 pulldown and output the progressive 24FPS. There isn't many SD TV's with this feature...
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