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Old 12-09-2012, 10:29 AM
 
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This is my first Blue Ray player. Is it normal for the disc movies to have different sound volume. For example, I bought the Dark Knight Trilogy. It came with 3 discs. All the movies are super low to medium even if I have the volume high. Is that the disc or the player? I tried changing the sound and audio on my HDTV and the Blue Ray. Also when I turn off the movie, it starts over when I return to it, even though I've tried pressing pause or stop.
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Old 12-09-2012, 02:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Singlelady10 View Post
This is my first Blue Ray player. Is it normal for the disc movies to have different sound volume.
I don't know if normal is the word but they certainly can. It's been my experience that most movies have low amplification. I believe the reason for that is because sound is so often used for dramatic effect, e.g you're listening to an average part of the movie and BOOM! They can't get that range without having the average parts with a low amplification.
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Old 12-09-2012, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
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First of all it is called Blu-Ray. Not Blue Ray.

And no it is not normal for the volume to be super low. I have a Sony Blu-Ray player and its volume seems "normal" whether playing Blu-Ray or conventional DVDs.

I suggest you check your BD player's audio settings in its settings menus. Perhaps a "variable" audio volume is set with low volume.

It is also possible that your TV is processing the digital audio in a funny way. Many BD discs now have as many as 7 different soundtracks, ranging from 2.0 channel stereo to TrueHD audio. Since your player is connected to your TV for sound, you might experiment with the audio track settings. My BD player is connected to a home theater system.
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Old 12-09-2012, 04:34 PM
 
Location: Diaspora
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Yes. I have numerous Blu-ray DVDs. I have a Samung, Sony and LG players and all do the same thing connected to different TVs. Some come thru the TVs at a low number like 8 and some I have to raise to 24 to hear.
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Old 12-10-2012, 05:50 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hoffdano View Post
I suggest you check your BD player's audio settings in its settings menus. Perhaps a "variable" audio volume is set with low volume.
A lot of the players and TV have audio "normalization" feature that has various names that will set the volume to a single level, this would be similar to the "turn down loud commercials" feature but that is problematic too because it can't examine the entire track for the highs and the lows.
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Old 12-10-2012, 10:12 AM
 
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Originally Posted by thecoalman View Post
I don't know if normal is the word but they certainly can. It's been my experience that most movies have low amplification. I believe the reason for that is because sound is so often used for dramatic effect, e.g you're listening to an average part of the movie and BOOM! They can't get that range without having the average parts with a low amplification.
"That range" is called dynamic range and is defined as the audible difference between the loudest and softest parts of an audio source.

Quote:
Originally Posted by thecoalman View Post
A lot of the players and TV have audio "normalization" feature that has various names that will set the volume to a single level, this would be similar to the "turn down loud commercials" feature but that is problematic too because it can't examine the entire track for the highs and the lows.
Dynamic range compression is the generic term for what you're referring to. I agree, the problem with it is that using it means a bomb going off is only slightly louder than two people talking in a quiet office. Since audio has a larger impact than video when watching a TV show or movie, it's a very detrimental feature. But some people need it for their own purposes.
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Old 12-10-2012, 10:16 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pruzhany View Post
Yes. I have numerous Blu-ray DVDs. I have a Samung, Sony and LG players and all do the same thing connected to different TVs. Some come thru the TVs at a low number like 8 and some I have to raise to 24 to hear.
That could (probably is) a function of the various TVs much more than the Blu-ray players. And the numbers mean nothing when compared between different TVs. There is no standard for volume increments.

Movie audio can definitely be at different levels from one to another. One reason is to accommodate a wider dynamic range, as someone else alluded to. And OP's definition of "low" may not be what ours is. Different TV, different room, different ambient noise level, etc.
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Old 12-10-2012, 01:29 PM
 
7,387 posts, read 5,628,601 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hoffdano View Post
First of all it is called Blu-Ray. Not Blue Ray.

And no it is not normal for the volume to be super low. I have a Sony Blu-Ray player and its volume seems "normal" whether playing Blu-Ray or conventional DVDs.

I suggest you check your BD player's audio settings in its settings menus. Perhaps a "variable" audio volume is set with low volume.

It is also possible that your TV is processing the digital audio in a funny way. Many BD discs now have as many as 7 different soundtracks, ranging from 2.0 channel stereo to TrueHD audio. Since your player is connected to your TV for sound, you might experiment with the audio track settings. My BD player is connected to a home theater system.
First of all sorry for adding the e and no adding the -.
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Old 12-10-2012, 01:31 PM
 
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So should I try a different Blu-ray, TV, HDMI, or disc?
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Old 12-10-2012, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Diaspora
21,540 posts, read 24,674,751 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vmaxnc View Post
That could (probably is) a function of the various TVs much more than the Blu-ray players. And the numbers mean nothing when compared between different TVs. There is no standard for volume increments.

Movie audio can definitely be at different levels from one to another. One reason is to accommodate a wider dynamic range, as someone else alluded to. And OP's definition of "low" may not be what ours is. Different TV, different room, different ambient noise level, etc.
TMI. Same DVD disc placed in different players on different TVs in different room. A low playing disc played low in all rooms.

How about instead of throwing technical terms around to make yourself sound smarter than other people you keep it simple? OP asked a question and there was absolutely no reason to supply unneeded technical BS. And please stop talking down to other posters as if they are stupid.
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