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Old 11-12-2015, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Houston/The Hague
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Finally ready to ditch my old 40" HDTV and upgrade this Black Friday. Two deals that look particularly attractive are Dell's 60" 4K Vizio HDTV for $799 and Walmart's 70" 1080p Vizio HDTV for $899.

I'm really torn between these options. The TV will be used in a large room with the viewing couch approximately 12-14' from the screen. I'm guessing that at this distance, 70" would be considerably more immersive than 60", and the benefit of 4K resolution would be minimal. But the allure of a more future-proof set at a lower price is hard to pass up.

Based on this viewing arrangement, would you recommend one TV over the other?
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Old 11-12-2015, 02:29 PM
 
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I have a 4K TV I bought last Christmas. I think it's a 55"? A Sony. Anything not 4K is upscaled to 4K. It's in my bedroom. From 15 feet away, I'm not sure I'd be able to tell the difference between it and a regular 1080p. It's also a smart TV, though, and I like that. Thousands of available apps.

Neither one of your choices costs all that much.
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Old 11-12-2015, 10:12 PM
 
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With that sized TV you'd start getting a benefit with the 4K at about 8 feet or less.

At 14 feet you'd need a TV minimally in the 100" inch range otherwise it will look the same as 1080p.



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Old 11-13-2015, 12:55 AM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...a traveling man.
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I was told by several companies that 4K is a waste of money since the broadcasters are only sending out 1080 signals, not 4K and that your 4k TV is in reality a 1080 picture you're getting.
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Old 11-13-2015, 08:07 AM
 
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Correct, most if not at best is going to be 1080. If it's cable or dish it's going to be a low quality 1080. While you are watching a football game switch back and forth from cable to OTA using an antenna. Most people don;t realize it but the highest quality video you can get for local stations is from an antenna.
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Old 11-13-2015, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Greensboro, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thecoalman View Post
Correct, most if not at best is going to be 1080. If it's cable or dish it's going to be a low quality 1080. While you are watching a football game switch back and forth from cable to OTA using an antenna. Most people don;t realize it but the highest quality video you can get for local stations is from an antenna.
Usually because the cable and satellite companies encode in MPEG4 where as OTA is MPEG2. With MPEG4, you're going to lose a little bit of quality. However, back when I had DirecTV, I compared an OTA channel to it's DirecTV counterpart, and in terms of sharpness, they were pretty close. In fact, the DirecTV picture looked much richer with color, even though both the sat receiver input and the OTA input were both calibrated with the same settings. So, I couldn't really tell a huge difference or any loss in quality with the satellite. Now, that might be different with another sat company or cable.

But I can comment on the Vizio 70". I have one at home hanging in our living room. We've had it about two years. We watch it from approximately 12-14 feet away. To me, 70" is perfect for that distance. However, in terms of the Vizio itself, it already has stuck white pixels and a line down at the bottom that goes the width of the screen. You can't tell the line unless you're up close, but you can see the stuck pixels when there's a bright white background. Dark backgrounds are fine though. It's not enough to ruin my viewing experience by any rate, but I'm a bit disappointed that I'm dealing with this issue after two years of ownership. I have a 2008 model Toshiba that is a 720 TV in the bedroom, and the picture still looks just as it did when I bought it brand new. I also spent over $1000 on it.

I'm not sure about Dell's 60" 4K. I have a dell computer monitor that is really nice. Personally, I feel Samsung has the best picture, but you're probably going to spend a little more for the quality.
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Old 11-13-2015, 10:14 PM
 
Location: Sarasota FL
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If a local station is broadcasting 1080, your TV will show full HD 1920x1080 with an antenna. The FCC allows cable/sat companies to compress the signal to 1440x1080 But not all local stations are broadcasting 1080. In my area, there are 7 sending 1080 and 6 sending 720 All SD sub channels are 480
When buying a TV, you have to look at more than size/price. Look for features also. If you will be connecting a surround sound, you want a TV with HDMI2 [arc], HDMI3 DVD/Bluray
If anyone is looking at Samsung, beware that Walmart sells only entry level 5000 series basic no features TV. If you want a 6000, 7000, 8000 series TV, you have to shop at HH Greg, Best Buy kind of stores

Last edited by d4g4m; 11-13-2015 at 10:33 PM..
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Old 11-14-2015, 07:51 AM
 
40,169 posts, read 41,782,366 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skinsguy37 View Post
Usually because the cable and satellite companies encode in MPEG4 where as OTA is MPEG2. With MPEG4, you're going to lose a little bit of quality.
MPEG4 variants are just more efficient than MPEG2. The issue is the bitrate they are using, by lowering the bitrate they reduce the bandwidth at the expense of quality. For OTA they have ridiculous amount of bandwidth available so it's irrelevant, for cable companies it becomes a priority.


Quote:
However, back when I had DirecTV, I compared an OTA channel to it's DirecTV counterpart, and in terms of sharpness, they were pretty close.
When you are comparing these things you need to compare something with a lot of action; football game, explosions, flickering lights. MPEG and other compressed formats reduce bitrate by reusing information from previous frames. If there is not enough bitrate to compensate for these changes that is where macroblocking occurs.

This is frame grab from lightly compressed DV, 25mbps. that blue light is moving extremely fast.This is interlaced which is why you have those lines, it's actually two positions of the light 1/60th of a second apart. Note how nice and sharp the edges are on the lights.





Compressed using MPEG2, 8mbps. If this was MPEG4 you get the same results with about 2500kbps.See how the edges of the light are little fuzzy.



Compressed using 3mbps which is not enough to compensate for the fast moving light.
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Old 11-14-2015, 11:49 PM
 
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For sure, over the air broadcasts are better than what you get over cable. However, it is possible to get actual 4K material from the likes of Amazon and YouTube.
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Old 11-16-2015, 09:09 PM
 
Location: Sarasota FL
6,865 posts, read 9,539,779 times
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If you decide to go with the 4K TV, make sure you have a modem, router that can handle 4k from Netflix, amazon, utube. And have a internet plan that supplies a lot of gigs a month. 4k eats bandwidth big time. And be advised, just as your cable company compresses 1920x1080 to 1440, you will not receive the full 2160 4k from your isp. There only place you will see full 2160 4k is on the TV demo in the store.
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