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Old 07-17-2016, 07:54 AM
 
Location: Idaho
2,549 posts, read 2,387,631 times
Reputation: 5420

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Quote:
Originally Posted by John7777 View Post
Last year I bought a 55" Sony 4K TV for my bedroom. I guess I usually sit around around 15 feet away. At that distance, I don't see much difference between upconverted 4K and the supposed 4K that you can get from Amazon or YouTube. On another thread, someone suggested that the stream you get from your internet provider might be compressed, so it's hard to know what your getting.

Anyway, the Sony 4K has a bunch of built in apps and didn't cost that much, so I'd do it again.
My exact feelings. I have a Sony 4K and I notice NO difference when I play it on 4K or standard 1080 from where I sit. Now, if I plant my nose six inches from the TV, and watch Marco Polo on Netflix 4k I see a big difference; however, I have to move back in order to drink the rum and coke; the glass hits the TV.

As for the internet and compression, I have heard that some providers do compress, some only compress when you hit a set number. I'm lucky. my monthly cap is 1.5 gig, with a speed of 150 mbps and they do not compress. And even watching some 4K, I never come close to the monthly cap; but it is only me; no one else. (If I had a family of four, I might be worried about capping out.)

The Sony upscale 4K Blu Ray does a decent job, and I can see a slight difference in some movies between a standard Blu Ray vs. the Blu Ray that upscales. But usually with those movies with high scenic content; movies that are just in cities, do not appear any better.

I purchased this TV, just before Christmas (Amazon) and I love it. However, if I had it to do over again, I would probably wait a few months and save a few hundred; but I was also replacing my entire sound system (which needed to be replaced) so I decided to do everything at the same time.
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Old 07-17-2016, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Southern Colorado
3,682 posts, read 1,895,857 times
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The new lighting technology...OLED...seems like a better investment when OLED television sets become more widely available. Apparently the picture quality is much better and the energy consumption is much lower.

My eyes are not as sharp as they used to be. 720p is quite the satisfactory image quality for me.....so 1080 meets my standards quite easily. There is still very, very little 4K material that is broadcast.

Streaming from Netflix.....720p helps keep me below my internet data cap. That is also the speed cap with my rural internet provider.

Being on solar power and using a slower internet streaming speed....I have different priorities that many. I look forward to evening television viewing without using the darkest, most energy efficient setting.

Figuring late 2018.....OLED 60". Thats my goal.

TCL televisions have been mentioned here. Do they last? They are certainly cheap. I remember when Vizio established market share by being cheap. Now Vizio is a respected brand. Same goes for Samsung...

FWIW....very happy with my LG 1080p picture quality.
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Old 07-17-2016, 09:44 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
25,128 posts, read 18,645,259 times
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Unless you are absolutely strapped for cash, I see no reason to buy a 1080p set, all things equal.

I got a Visio 50" 4k M series for I think $549 back in March. This is with a very nice remote, built in Netflix/Hulu/Amazon Prime in 4K (audio is an optical out into my 5.1 system), five HDMI and other inputs, etc. A 1080P set of similar quality would have only been nominally cheaper ($100-$150).

True, there is little in the way of 4K content out there, and IMO, Netflix 4K is still worse quality than most BluRays. With that said, I took the TV and hooked it into my computer. There is absolutely no comparison between 1080p at traditional monitor viewing distance. 4K is so much sharper, textures seem sharper, there is little need for antialiasing, etc. I have a three year old I7 3770K at 4.5 GHz and a GTX 960 and played WoW at 4K flawlessly, as well as the new Doom semi-well (25 fps or so). That's not even counting the beautiful Youtube content in 4K (a lot of nature/tech demo type stuff), which is far better than what you get streaming, or the 4K BluRays from this year's releases that will start making their mark once the Xbox One S comes out. Deadpool, Batman vs. Superman, Warcraft, and other blockbusters are available in 4K UHD Bluray.

Of course, there are additional costs. If you have a 1080P receiver, you'll need to upgrade it to a 4K capable one or just run audio out from the 4K device and use the receiver for audio only and plug the HDMI into your TV. You may need upgrades in your internet bandwidth, in house network, etc. I have a 100 mbps internet connection with an AC1200 router and have no problem streaming with 4K with no buffering.

There is a massive lack of 4K content but the same can be said about cable broadcasting - virtually all cable broadcasts remain in 720P. My fat PS3 from a decade ago with the initial Bluray releases provided far better image quality than what is available now on general television - there's your real bottleneck.
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Old 07-17-2016, 10:25 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...a traveling man.
40,068 posts, read 48,949,086 times
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Interesting article...

Why Ultra HD 4K TVs are still stupid - CNET
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Old 07-17-2016, 11:46 PM
 
1,292 posts, read 768,431 times
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I believe in the concept of "Good Enough". My $998 70" Visio is good enough. Our eyes and perception adapt to various colors and light quality throughout the day and different environments. It serves no purpose to train your eyes to recognize various minute flaws in a tv picture quality. You never again see the leap in picture quality that you saw when you went from a 25" CRT analogue TV to a any big screen 1080 tv. If I want a more impressive TV experience, I turn on the front projector with the 120" screen in the basement.
One can upgrade a bit on a front projector but my $550 Epson refurb is "good enough".
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Old 07-18-2016, 02:10 AM
 
40,169 posts, read 41,782,366 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by f5fstop View Post

As for the internet and compression, I have heard that some providers do compress, some only compress when you hit a set number.
Your ISP will not be compressing the video, instead the service will. Your cable TV is going to be very compressed too. Compare a football game being broadcast over cable and antenna, there is substantial difference.

A Blu Ray video might be 25Mbps +/-, "HD" from Netflix might be 4Mbps. Note this might not be direct comparison because the codecs being utilized could be different.

Last edited by thecoalman; 07-18-2016 at 02:23 AM..
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Old 07-18-2016, 02:22 AM
 
40,169 posts, read 41,782,366 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
Netflix 4K is still worse quality than most BluRays.
As you lower the bitrate (compress the video) there is a point where lowering the resolution produces better results. These services are skirting that line on the lower end of the bitrate.

For example with DVD using MPEG2 that is very inefficient codec compared to modern ones. Once you get past about 4Mbps you will start to get macroblocking. If you lower the resolution you'll eliminate the macroblocks, you may not have the detail but detail is irrelevant if the bitrate is not sufficient to reproduce it.
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Old 07-18-2016, 04:10 AM
 
10,160 posts, read 10,482,230 times
Reputation: 5442
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
Unless you are absolutely strapped for cash, I see no reason to buy a 1080p set, all things equal. I got a Visio 50" 4k M series for I think $549 back in March. This is with a very nice remote, built in Netflix/Hulu/Amazon Prime in 4K (audio is an optical out into my 5.1 system), five HDMI and other inputs, etc. A 1080P set of similar quality would have only been nominally cheaper ($100-$150).
LG releases £23,000 84" ultra HD 4K TV in the UK for Christmas 2012 where they were gobbled by rock stars and sheiks. But now, four years later it is roughly a 20% price increase.

As your TV is probably going to last 7 years at a minimum, it is a reasonable investment in the future.
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Old 07-18-2016, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
11,815 posts, read 13,956,611 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColoGuy View Post

TCL televisions have been mentioned here. Do they last? They are certainly cheap. I remember when Vizio established market share by being cheap. Now Vizio is a respected brand. Same goes for Samsung...
I would assume they last. TCL is China's largest manufacturer of TV's and the worlds 3rd largest, all without selling any in the USA. This is not some tiny little company making knock offs. They've only been in the US for a year or two which is why we've never heard of them.
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Old 07-19-2016, 07:23 AM
 
Location: Hiding from Antifa?
6,679 posts, read 4,361,602 times
Reputation: 6038
Quote:
Originally Posted by wit-nit View Post
Be sure to read all the way to the end of the article where he links to an update, showing he no longer thinks they are stupid!
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