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Old 11-22-2015, 10:25 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
573 posts, read 665,067 times
Reputation: 1261

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Quote:
Originally Posted by observer53 View Post
I would think it would depend on whether the old TV still worked. St Vincent De Paul won't take an old tube TV that doesn't work.
True, but OP asked how you got rid of your last TV. Mine worked fine, so I donated it.
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Old 11-22-2015, 10:48 PM
 
Location: Close to an earthquake
890 posts, read 698,216 times
Reputation: 2390
There's always a scrooge in a large crowd. Got rid of TV about 10 years ago and haven't owned one since.
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Old 11-23-2015, 08:30 AM
 
Location: AriZona
5,230 posts, read 3,260,957 times
Reputation: 5419
Quote:
Originally Posted by borninsac View Post
There's always a scrooge in a large crowd. Got rid of TV about 10 years ago and haven't owned one since.
Humbug!
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Old 11-23-2015, 08:43 AM
 
2,563 posts, read 2,871,944 times
Reputation: 3498
I bought my last TV last Christmas season at Fry's. Around the house I had four other TVs that were more or less just sitting there. So far, I've given one away. I might keep one of the others, but the rest I'll probably just give away, as it would probably be too much trouble to try to sell them, and I'm going to move in the spring to a hopefully smaller place.
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Old 11-23-2015, 08:47 AM
 
5,750 posts, read 7,195,400 times
Reputation: 5184
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zathras View Post
My philosophy is I NEVER buy the ext warranties on a tv or other electronics. most come with 1 or 2 years. if it doesn't go tango uniform in the first year you have a good chance at it surviving the life of the extended warranty.
We've got 2 samsung flat screens that have been going strong for > 5 yrs... and 2 yrs ago I bought 3 cheapo "Sceptre" flatscreens online for my recroom. probably made in hong kong. still going strong.

ext warranties are basically an insurance policy. ymmv but I personally think they're mostly a waste of money.

but back to the OP topic- we recently tried to sell our 10 year old 62" magnavox rear LCD projection tv. one of those monsters that weighs 140lbs. It still worked fine, but we just wanted something smaller. Paid 4grand for that thing back in 2005. Had a hard time giving it away, but finally found someone to come take it for free.

After the holidays I'll be looking for a good deal on a large 4k (uhd) to replace it.
If you buy a TV at Costco and it is below $500, the cost to extend it to 5 years is around $30 (from memory). TV's in 2015 simply are not as reliable. I'm suggesting you have a solid chance of needing a repair. This will also depend on where you are located. Where salt air is present (not here) then I predict >>50% chance of needing a repair. Also if you get a lot of power outages (TX comes to mind) then those fast power cycles cause many more issues on the wrong power supply design.

What I do know is TVs are disposable. Re: electronics. Again, it depends. For home theater products and in 2015, you have video upconversion, HDMI handshaking potential issues, on the fly firmware updates, Ethernet network and wireless capability, Airplay and Bluetooth, zone 2, zone, 3, dual HDMI out, etc. In 2005, take away 90% of those features. IF the warranty is cheap, then I could contemplate it. Or use a credit card that doubles the warranty (my AMEX does this). Cost: "free" (the merchant pays and extra 1.7% cc fees).

Same with cell phones. I get mine from Costco (Samsung) and buy the Square trade. It's a PITA but to execute but for $99 and up to 3 phones replaced even because of stupidity, that is a wonderful deal on a $700 (actual const not subsidized) phone. Putting it another way, I lost money on my phone (a $99 donation) but my wife used it 3 times, my son 3 times, and my daughter 2 times.
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Old 11-23-2015, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Chandler, AZ
3,050 posts, read 2,723,692 times
Reputation: 4141
Bought our last 2 from Best Deal in Town (Tempe), donated older TVs (if they are working) to Goodwill or the Chandler Recycling center if they are broken.
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Old 11-23-2015, 10:20 AM
 
5,750 posts, read 7,195,400 times
Reputation: 5184
Quote:
Originally Posted by Heath V View Post
Prices on 4K televisions have dropped dramatically, it's incredible.
Much of the reason for the "4k" drop is because the TV doesn't have HDCP 2.2 or HDMI2.0(a). Google it. HDCP2.2 is the new content protection platform that will BLOCK 4K content (HD Content Protection). The BB sales guy has no idea what I just typed because they are "technically challenged". Their manager probably won't either. So they are selling many "4K sets" that have no chance of working with products that will have the HDCP 4K flag. If your home theater receiver doesn't have HDCP 2.2, that too will block the signal.

HDMI 2.0(a) (KEY letter (a)) is for HDR). HDR is a huge paradigm shift in video performance and has nothing to do with 4K. The amount of pixels has far less to do with overall video quality than the total color pallet known as HDR (or High Dynamic Range). So the bulk of the deals on "4K sets" are 4K sets without the ability to pass the new content flag. OR, they don't have HDR. The streaming 4K is heavily compressed because of video bandwidth delivery but those devices will stream 4K even to a non-HDC TV set.

4K looks "better" not so much because of more pixels but rather they use better cameras with better sensors, lenses, and upconversion. 4K TV's look better because they have better caliber glass, optics, and upconversion and NOT because it has more pixels. So yes, there are incredible looking (pending) 1K sets with HDR that will destroy the video quality of current 4K sets.

If it matter, I study this topic and I could write a book about the technical differences.
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Old 11-23-2015, 10:39 AM
 
1,387 posts, read 1,326,202 times
Reputation: 1989
Quote:
Originally Posted by Heath V View Post
Prices on 4K televisions have dropped dramatically, it's incredible.
I didn't care for them, I bought one and took it back. Most current and older movies on a 4k look like they were filmed with a handheld camera, it makes a lot of the movies cheesier. The only thing 4k was decent for was sports, but it wasn't a big enough difference to justify the price.
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Old 11-23-2015, 11:02 AM
 
Location: Houston/The Hague
1,052 posts, read 997,036 times
Reputation: 1174
I've bought and sold all but one of my HDTVs on Craigslist. You have to deal with a few flakes, but usually you can find a buyer (or a well-priced TV) if you're not in a hurry.

The market for used LCDs is pretty good. I just sold a 40" 1080p for $140, that I bought ~5 years ago for $250. I'd say $110 depreciation in 5 years isn't bad. I'll be replacing it on black friday with a new set, likely ordered online.

DLP TVs are nearly worthless and tube sets are worthless. I didn't even bother trying to sell my wife's old tube TV (which her dad bought new for ~1000 back in the day). We just moved it to our rental condo for our tenants to use. Around here, I don't think Goodwill even takes tube TVs anymore. Put it on the Free section of craigslist and someone will take it, though.
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Old 11-23-2015, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Peoria, AZ
955 posts, read 1,104,619 times
Reputation: 1043
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwarnecke View Post
I've bought and sold all but one of my HDTVs on Craigslist. You have to deal with a few flakes, but usually you can find a buyer (or a well-priced TV) if you're not in a hurry.

The market for used LCDs is pretty good. I just sold a 40" 1080p for $140, that I bought ~5 years ago for $250. I'd say $110 depreciation in 5 years isn't bad. I'll be replacing it on black friday with a new set, likely ordered online.

DLP TVs are nearly worthless and tube sets are worthless. I didn't even bother trying to sell my wife's old tube TV (which her dad bought new for ~1000 back in the day). We just moved it to our rental condo for our tenants to use. Around here, I don't think Goodwill even takes tube TVs anymore. Put it on the Free section of craigslist and someone will take it, though.
Even better than that. I just sat my old tube TV out by my driveway.

Within a couple of hours, it was gone and problem solved.
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