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Old 12-23-2015, 04:06 PM
 
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Is an FM transmitting device really a lot more technically advanced that a regular FM radio (receiver)?

I remember an episode of Gilligan's Island where the Skipper was trying to fall asleep because he kept having a recurring dream that he was back in the Navy, and he was rewiring a radio in order to convert it into a transmitter. I think at least 50% of GI episodes had a similar theme, but they never explained how the professor couldn't figure it out. Just kidding.

But I'm actually referring to the little devices that people plug their MP3 players into, in order to transmit the music to a nearby radio, such as a car stereo or home stereo, in order to listen to the music player on larger speakers. I'm not even sure if they use any electronic components or not.

Should they be a lot more expensive than an ordinary radio? Such a small transistor radio?

Also, what were they used for in the past? (Other than people stranded on deserted islands.)
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Old 12-23-2015, 09:48 PM
 
Location: Sarasota FL
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Any device designed to 'transmit' FM must comply with FCC regs.
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Old 12-24-2015, 01:33 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by d4g4m View Post
Any device designed to 'transmit' FM must comply with FCC regs.
Interesting. If that's true, I'll bet most Ipod users don't even realize they are probably using them illegally. I used to work with a guy who played it (rock music) through his desk radio. One day when I was flipping through stations I could pick up his Ipod very clearly.
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Old 12-25-2015, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Gulf Coast Texas
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Anything that transmits a low power signal, the manufacturer of the device handles the legal requirements and frequency allocations.

Any iPod user is good with whatever they transmit because Apple has already dealt with the legalities in the design phase of the product.

If you are transmitting on FM Frequencies, consumers have a small amount of power that they can freely use.

Low power is under a watt of power.

Last edited by DRob4JC; 12-25-2015 at 06:33 PM..
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Old 12-26-2015, 07:47 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DRob4JC View Post
Any iPod user is good with whatever they transmit because Apple has already dealt with the legalities in the design phase of the product.
I'm referring to someone listening to vulgar music/comedy on their IPod. This would not be legal to transmit. But I doubt that anyone thinks about that when they do. There would be no way to trace that if someone were to broadcast it in a public area on a popular station. It DOES override the radio, as I discovered from my coworker incident.
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Old 12-26-2015, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Gulf Coast Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OzzyRules View Post
I'm referring to someone listening to vulgar music/comedy on their IPod. This would not be legal to transmit. But I doubt that anyone thinks about that when they do. There would be no way to trace that if someone were to broadcast it in a public area on a popular station. It DOES override the radio, as I discovered from my coworker incident.
There are no restrictions on "unlicensed" broadcasts - which refers to a radiated power of .01 microwatts on the FM band, and a coverage radius of approximately 200 feet.
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Old 12-26-2015, 10:01 AM
 
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All of those Best Buy etc. FM transmitters used in cars etc. are entirely legal and within FCC limits. The consumer transmitters for the general public transmit at levels below regulatory ones. So although you might annoy a person next to you if they happen to be on the same FM station you are transmitting to, no one else will pick up the signal anyways.

It's a whole different story when you look at eBay or a store that markets professional transmitters. Those require FCC approval. The big fines come from pirate broadcasters who use a frequency where they are transmitting for miles, and their signal infringes on the area of a licensed stations broadcast area.
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Old 12-26-2015, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Gulf Coast Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by metalmancpa View Post
All of those Best Buy etc. FM transmitters used in cars etc. are entirely legal and within FCC limits. The consumer transmitters for the general public transmit at levels below regulatory ones. So although you might annoy a person next to you if they happen to be on the same FM station you are transmitting to, no one else will pick up the signal anyways.

It's a whole different story when you look at eBay or a store that markets professional transmitters. Those require FCC approval. The big fines come from pirate broadcasters who use a frequency where they are transmitting for miles, and their signal infringes on the area of a licensed stations broadcast area.
I agree.
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Old 12-26-2015, 10:30 AM
 
11,092 posts, read 13,106,553 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by metalmancpa View Post
All of those Best Buy etc. FM transmitters used in cars etc. are entirely legal and within FCC limits. The consumer transmitters for the general public transmit at levels below regulatory ones. So although you might annoy a person next to you if they happen to be on the same FM station you are transmitting to, no one else will pick up the signal anyways.
Actually my coworker was in the next room. So he was not exactly "next" to me.

I think they are basically allowing something that probably is illegal, by making it powerful enough to be useful for the listener. It's just not a big enough deal, and I don't think anyone would care if they happened to hear vulgar content momentarily. They might even welcome it as a change.
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