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Old 09-21-2016, 09:33 AM
 
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I'm in the market for a 65 to 70inch HD tv and so far I'm leaning toward Samsung 70" Class (69.5" Diag.) 4K Ultra HD LED LCD TV UN70KU630DFXZA from Costco. But I'm reading online that HDR is a feature that's worth the extra $.

What do you guys think? The tv would be mainly to watch movies and video games.
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Old 09-21-2016, 10:38 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
11,825 posts, read 13,964,257 times
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That's really up to you. 4K is pretty damn gorgeous. Frankly I couldn't imagine a better picture then that (of course we said that with 1080p). HDR brings.... better color? Better blacks?? Call me skeptical.

When I show this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iNJdPyoqt8U

to people on my 4K TV... jaws drop. I have a hard time believing HDR would make it even better because it is beautiful.

How much more are we talking for HDR? Bottom line. You shared a Costo link with us. We can't see the price.
I might pay an extra $100 for HDR... much more then that and no way...
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Old 09-21-2016, 11:47 AM
 
Location: McAllen, TX
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What I've read is that the 4k part is meh, especially from a distance. How many people get up close to watch a 70" TV? The HDR is what does makes a difference according to this article. I cannot speak from personal experience. I don't own a 4k TV but have seen them in the store and was very impressed. It could be the TV I was checking out had HDR, I don't know. It was large, either a 65" or 70"

4K TV Is Boring, But HDR Is Amazing
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Old 09-21-2016, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Wappingers Falls, NY
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The local dimming that HDR brings actually annoys me some, I find it way too visible. I love 4k by itself, it's a noticable difference, though not a huge one. If I was going to buy a TV with local dimming or HDR enabled, I'd want it to be OLED. Essentially there's no "LED zones" on an OLED screen, since each individual pixel can turn completely off.
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Old 09-21-2016, 09:58 PM
 
Location: Sarasota FL
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The '4k' tv is an improvement over current HD tv's but like what you get now from sat/cable/isp, the 4k signal will be compressed. The HD tv says 1920x1080 but you are getting only 1440x1080. To see the full uncompressed 1920x1080, it is only available from your local [prime] TV station with an OTA antenna. The only way to see a full 2160x1080 [4k] video is with an in home disc player.
A better quality [more expensive, not entry level] 4k TV might have firmware that will up convert lower signals to near 4k quality. What does a 480 SD look like on a 4k TV?
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Old 09-22-2016, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Wappingers Falls, NY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by d4g4m View Post
The '4k' tv is an improvement over current HD tv's but like what you get now from sat/cable/isp, the 4k signal will be compressed. The HD tv says 1920x1080 but you are getting only 1440x1080. To see the full uncompressed 1920x1080, it is only available from your local [prime] TV station with an OTA antenna. The only way to see a full 2160x1080 [4k] video is with an in home disc player.
A better quality [more expensive, not entry level] 4k TV might have firmware that will up convert lower signals to near 4k quality. What does a 480 SD look like on a 4k TV?
Very very incorrect there. First of all, most "cable" signals are 720p or 1080i, some providers have a couple of special 1080p or 4k channels, but the vast majority of it is 1080i or 720p. As far as the "only" way to see 4k video being a disc player, that's completely not true: 4k or UHD content is available via YouTube, Netflix, Amazon, and VUDU right now, among others. What this boils down to is that you want to use streaming services to get your 4k content.
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Old 09-22-2016, 09:00 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
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After doing a comparison with the same content playing side-by-side, I decided that 4k is just not that much better than 1080 to justify the cost, especially since we mostly watch TV while doing other things and don't watch a lot of movies. The modern 1080 display is sooo much better than the old CRT TVs that we watched for over 40 years, we really see no reason to need anything better.
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Old 09-22-2016, 09:07 AM
 
877 posts, read 587,263 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
After doing a comparison with the same content playing side-by-side, I decided that 4k is just not that much better than 1080 to justify the cost, especially since we mostly watch TV while doing other things and don't watch a lot of movies. The modern 1080 display is sooo much better than the old CRT TVs that we watched for over 40 years, we really see no reason to need anything better.
That is true for now but what about in a few years? I'm leaning toward a 4k HUD ready. This one from Costco Samsung 65" Class (64.5" Diag) 4K SUHD LED LCD TV UN65KS800DFXZA
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Old 09-22-2016, 09:11 AM
 
Location: McAllen, TX
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True 4K is exactly twice what 1080 is. So 1920 x 1080 becomes 3840 x 2160. In order to stream that amount of data uncompressed requires a lot of bandwidth, way beyond what we are capable of these days. Yes, you can get it from different sources like the previous poster mentions but there is more to it than just resolution. There is also bandwidth which is known as the bitrate. So it will be compressed no matter what even from a 4k blu ray player. According to this article 4K Blu Ray will max out at 106mbps and Netflix 4k streams average at 16mbps. So as far as streaming that will be limited unless you are lucky enough to have gigabit internet. I'm stuck at 15 so I can only dream, but some day maybe.

Ultra HD Blu-ray arrives March 2016; here’s everything we know

Quote:
The baseband (uncompressed) video bitrate of True 4K UHDTV equates to approximately 12 gigabits per second (Gbps). In comparison, uncompressed 720p and 1080i HDTV requires 1.5 Gbps, while “full” HDTV (1080p60/50) requires 3 Gbps. There is already, what is known as a “bandwidth crunch” with current HDTV services and so the need for four to eight times the bandwidth over HDTV to deliver uncompressed 4K UHDTV services is problematic. The highest bitrate standardized single-link professional video interface available today is 3Gbps and four of these are needed to be linked together in order to carry a single live uncompressed True 4K UHDTV signal.
The Adoption Of 4K Streaming Will Be Stalled By Bandwidth, Not Hardware & Devices - Dan Rayburn - StreamingMediaBlog.com
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Old 09-22-2016, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
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I guess... but that 4K video from Youtube, compressed or not, is currently good enough for me. It is jaw dropping...
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