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Old 02-15-2017, 08:04 AM
 
35,108 posts, read 41,319,700 times
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Nothing, Mr. CSD is technology challenged so we stick with the basics and as much non technical as we can.
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Old 02-15-2017, 09:15 AM
 
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I think I haven't actually bought 3 new gadgets in the last year - or at least not the sort of gadgets I assume you to be talking about. A couple relevant things that I found cool:

For the tech savvy:
1. The Arduino. It's a little microcontroller. You can hook up sensors and electric components to it and control it through programming.
The nice thing about it is the more you want to do with it and the more you're willing to learn, the more you CAN do with it. After playing with mine for a while, I wrote a program for my computer that communicates with their arduino via USB. The Arduino sends the computer data from various sensors that are connected to it and the computer allows me to adjust what are done with those values and tell the arduino to control various switches.
I'm using it for automating my Rx7

2. The Raspberry Pi. This is a tiny computer with a quad core processor. A cool idea I've been seeing going around is building a little retro gaming system out of it. People will have Super Nintendo, Nintendo, Nintendo64, Genesis, etc. games all crammed onto an SD card inside this thing. Then they'll get a couple dualshock or retro controllers and connect via USB. The kicker is that it takes up almost no space and is very cheap.

3. A home file server. I just set one up myself last night. I used Ubuntu Server, SAMBA and Subsonic to setup a little file server to hold movies, music and various large files. I did it on the cheap.
The processor is a $26 Opteron 6276, there's 5 160GB HDD's, each one was $12. So decent amount of fast storage. And a repository of music and movies for use anywhere in the house
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Old 02-15-2017, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Houston/The Hague
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Good idea, I might try that. I'm even considering climbing up in the attic and fishing Ethernet cable, in order to setup a separate router. Or relocating my modem and router to the center of the house. Which will also require fishing cable...
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Old 02-15-2017, 11:53 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gwarnecke View Post
Good idea, I might try that. I'm even considering climbing up in the attic and fishing Ethernet cable, in order to setup a separate router. Or relocating my modem and router to the center of the house. Which will also require fishing cable...
Why not run powerline internet? Much easier than fishng cable, and much more flexible. It is like having ethernet jacks all over the house.
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Old 02-15-2017, 12:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbear99 View Post
Why not run powerline internet? Much easier than fishng cable, and much more flexible. It is like having ethernet jacks all over the house.
I tried this, and I'll have to say that when it worked, it was great, but once you got the right distance away, you'd get absolutely horrible connection. Packets constantly dropping and significantly increased latency. (like 1000+ms)
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Old 02-15-2017, 12:52 PM
 
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^ you might have bad wiring, although the house I ran it in was built in the 1920s. Never had any problems, and used multiple outlets.

How old was your gear?
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Old 02-15-2017, 10:45 PM
 
1,294 posts, read 630,757 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbear99 View Post
^ you might have bad wiring, although the house I ran it in was built in the 1920s. Never had any problems, and used multiple outlets.

How old was your gear?
The house I used it in was '80s. I wonder if the difference is in complexity of the circuit potentially...?
I live in a slightly older house now, so I might hook it up and see what happens. I'm sort of interested now.
I am not an electrician, so I am purely speculating.

Also, I'm not bashing on the technology. If it works well for you, it's really great and very convenient. For instance, being able to connect things like a PS4 by simply plugging one in behind the TV is great. It gives pretty decent transfer speeds too. It's not gigabit (I think mine were 300mbps), but for all practical purposes, that'll probably suit most users just fine.
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Old 02-16-2017, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Keller, TX
5,669 posts, read 5,272,583 times
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HTC Vive room-scale VR headset
my PC (i7 6700K, GF 980Ti, 32 GB RAM)
Emotiva Stealth 8 powered monitors with AMT tweeters
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Old 03-02-2017, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Houston/The Hague
1,054 posts, read 998,308 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbear99 View Post
Why not run powerline internet? Much easier than fishng cable, and much more flexible. It is like having ethernet jacks all over the house.
Quick update - I ended up swapping my old wifi router (gigabit, but not dual-band) for the ASUS dual-band router that T-Mobile will give you for free to improve wifi calling capability in your house. Night and day difference! With my router at one corner of our house (two stories, ~4500 sq ft) I now get a strong signal throughout the house and even a little ways into the backyard.
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Old 03-02-2017, 06:07 PM
 
169 posts, read 93,501 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
I see no need for either of those, the are not any more useful than Siri on the iPhone and iPad. We do have a wifi extender to use mobile devices outside and all over the house which is big and 2 story, and have replaced most of our lighting with LED.
I also don't see the need for smart speakers like amazon echo. I really don't see anything they can do that smartphone can't.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyl3r View Post
I think I haven't actually bought 3 new gadgets in the last year - or at least not the sort of gadgets I assume you to be talking about. A couple relevant things that I found cool:

For the tech savvy:
1. The Arduino. It's a little microcontroller. You can hook up sensors and electric components to it and control it through programming.

I'm using it for automating my Rx7

Googled it. It's like raspberry pi to me. But how exactly did you automate your car using this? I am assuming Rx7 is mazda? When I googled it, that's what pops out.


2. The Raspberry Pi. This is a tiny computer with a quad core processor. A cool idea I've been seeing going around is building a little retro gaming system out of it. People will have Super Nintendo, Nintendo, Nintendo64, Genesis, etc. games all crammed onto an SD card inside this thing.

You can play all those games in your old PC now using emulators.
My husband did buy a nest thermostat though. But mostly for saving energy. He did not have any idea you can control it using ok google via your smartphone. Even though, I showed it to him and he did set it up, he rarely use voice commands to it.

I did bought myself a projector back when I have my apartment and was always excited to come home to my own drive through theater everyday! I use my wall as screen. I mostly use it to watch movies, and as my PC projector and found out how expensive it is to replace the lamps. $250 a pop. I think I replaced it twice in a span of a year or 2 so I stopped using it as pc monitor. Currently it's collecting dust.
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