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Old 04-19-2017, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Buxton, England
659 posts, read 236,944 times
Reputation: 370

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In the last 2 months I've gone through 5 bed side lamps. I am plugging them into an ordinary wall socket that has no problems powering other equipment (such as heaters and laptops etc).

Every single lamp has lasted about 2 weeks or so and then blown up.

It's always the same. I will reach to turn it on and it will go on for about 1 second, then off. No bulb blowing or anything, at first. But then when I try to turn it on again, it blows up. The bulb blows, the lamp blows, and never works again with any other bulb. Sick to fudging death of this now.

I can't afford to keep buying new lamps and whatever. What in the hell causes this nonsense to happen? I can't even imagine why all these lamps would just be blowing up after 2 weeks. And I'm using appropriate bulbs for the lamps too.
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Old 04-19-2017, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
18,564 posts, read 55,493,012 times
Reputation: 32332
Incandescents? LED? CFL?

Newer lamp cords have minimal conducting capacity. The inrush from an incandescent shorting is enough to fry the conductors. If you haven't switched to LEDs, do so now.

You could have a high voltage issue blowing incandescents or they could be a bad batch. Laptop bricks and heaters are immune to a lot of power issues.
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Old 04-19-2017, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Buxton, England
659 posts, read 236,944 times
Reputation: 370
One of the lamps had a CFL bulb but all the rest were incandescent ones, 40W bulbs. I now have a lamp with CFL bulb in place, and see how long that lasts.
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Old 04-20-2017, 05:29 PM
 
2,904 posts, read 1,707,067 times
Reputation: 2988
Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
Newer lamp cords have minimal conducting capacity. The inrush from an incandescent shorting is enough to fry the conductors. If you haven't switched to LEDs, do so now.
This is total hogwash. Where'd you ever get such an idea.

For the record, there are strict standards for lamp cords. They originated decades ago for fire safety. While it is true that tungsten filiments have lower resistance when cold, it takes only milliseconds for them to heat to operating temperate, with much higher resistance and lower current draw. The turn on current pulse is so short and the thermal mass of the cord so high that the cord temperature does not budge if you're using a normal wattage lamp.
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Old 04-20-2017, 06:43 PM
Status: "Enjoying life..." (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston/Tricity
39,947 posts, read 57,785,520 times
Reputation: 93873
I don't remember EVER any lamp to blow up after two week of use. Are you buying cheap bulbs? Is there anything wrong with your light circuits? Some of my bulbs are burning since I bought my house in 2000. Sixteen years!
If a bulb blows up, it does usually almost immediately because it's faulty, but a good bulb lasts for a long time.
If there is nothing wrong with the outlet, then perhaps a loose connection in the lamp holder causes the bulb to blow.
Does the fuse for the lighting circuit blow also?
What kind of light bulbs are you using? Incandescent? Fluorescent? Halogen? LED? Compact (spiral) CFL?
What brand?

I also heard that you are not supposed to touch halogen lamp bulb with bare hands. You skin contains oils that contaminate the lining of the bulb, causing a weak spot that, when heated, can cause the bulb to burn out or explode. Use gloves or gently clean the touched area with rubbing alcohol.
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Last edited by elnina; 04-20-2017 at 06:52 PM..
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Old 04-20-2017, 07:05 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
18,564 posts, read 55,493,012 times
Reputation: 32332
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbear99 View Post
This is total hogwash. Where'd you ever get such an idea.

For the record, there are strict standards for lamp cords. They originated decades ago for fire safety. While it is true that tungsten filiments have lower resistance when cold, it takes only milliseconds for them to heat to operating temperate, with much higher resistance and lower current draw. The turn on current pulse is so short and the thermal mass of the cord so high that the cord temperature does not budge if you're using a normal wattage lamp.
Waltz yourself down to a "Freds" or "Big Lots" or other store selling cheap made in China table lamps. Look at the wattage rating; the MAX rating these days is 40 watts (and that is pushing it). I've clipped one of the zip cords and found them to be equive to about 20 or 22 gauge or smaller, with multistrand thin enough that failure of at least some strands under any significant current or torsion is almost a given, putting more current through the remaining strands. Those cords are designed to go open circuit rather than start a fire. It ain't yer grandad's zip cord.
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Old 04-20-2017, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Diaspora
21,550 posts, read 24,690,260 times
Reputation: 8930
Is this a house or an apartment?
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Old 04-20-2017, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Florida & Cebu, Philippines
2,808 posts, read 2,518,442 times
Reputation: 2877
If on a wall switch then check to make sure the connections are tight on it and on the outlet, only do this if you are competent to, otherwise have an electrician do it, either way, be sure to shut off the breakers before working on electricity.
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Old 04-21-2017, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
25,393 posts, read 11,261,033 times
Reputation: 21391
This is only directly related, but beware of leaving CFL bulbs on when you are not at home. One night I started smelling something burning. The ceramic (?) base if a CFL bulb was overheated and smoking.
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Old 04-21-2017, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Not far from Fairbanks, AK
16,726 posts, read 29,330,321 times
Reputation: 12539
Buy another lamp, or just replace the light's socket. The problem is with the socket itself.
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