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Old 05-08-2017, 09:01 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
30,885 posts, read 56,300,624 times
Reputation: 32914

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Back in 2013 we replaced most of our appliances, though they were still working they were 15-20 years and the new ones are far more efficient and quiet. Last week the LG dishwasher stopped running with a code FE (fill error). We have been washing them by hand while considering whether to pay $250 or so for repairs, or buy another new one. Then last night the Samsung dryer stopped heating. No error codes, it runs like normal but with only cold air blowing through it. After testing, the element, thermistor and thermal fuse all show the correct continuity/resistance so it's more likely an internal circuit board. Now I'm looking for a technician that can repair both, and probably spend the whole day. One problem with reviews when buying is that they haven't been out long, so everyone loves their new appliance. When I go back and look at the reviews on these now, there are many problems showing up.
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Old 05-08-2017, 09:07 AM
 
Location: Mount Laurel
4,169 posts, read 9,416,868 times
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Learn to repair them yourself


https://www.repairclinic.com/




There are lots of electronics in today's appliances. Most appliances can be open up easily these days (except for some of those expensive fridge).
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Old 05-08-2017, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
25,419 posts, read 11,269,640 times
Reputation: 21395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
Back in 2013 we replaced most of our appliances, though they were still working they were 15-20 years and the new ones are far more efficient and quiet. Last week the LG dishwasher stopped running with a code FE (fill error). We have been washing them by hand while considering whether to pay $250 or so for repairs, or buy another new one. Then last night the Samsung dryer stopped heating. No error codes, it runs like normal but with only cold air blowing through it. After testing, the element, thermistor and thermal fuse all show the correct continuity/resistance so it's more likely an internal circuit board. Now I'm looking for a technician that can repair both, and probably spend the whole day. One problem with reviews when buying is that they haven't been out long, so everyone loves their new appliance. When I go back and look at the reviews on these now, there are many problems showing up.
I'm beginning to wonder about not how advanced Samsung appliances are (I have one of their televisions), but how good their longevity is. Not to mention whether they will burn my house down!
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Old 05-08-2017, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
18,592 posts, read 55,510,434 times
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This might not sound like a direct answer, but invest in a whole house surge protector. The changes from electro-mechanical components, which are robust, to electronic control circuitry, which can be damaged by surges, means more failures.
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Old 05-08-2017, 12:07 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
30,885 posts, read 56,300,624 times
Reputation: 32914
Quote:
Originally Posted by sj08054 View Post
Learn to repair them yourself


https://www.repairclinic.com/




There are lots of electronics in today's appliances. Most appliances can be open up easily these days (except for some of those expensive fridge).
In the past I have, in fact have replaced heating elements and belts on dryers, ignition on a gas stove, washing machine parts. The problem is that now they have so many electronics, everything has a mother board and several processors in it, and it takes special equipment to diagnose the problem. I'm not going to throw parts at it. For both of these problems, the internet sites such as the one you gave list 3-5 different parts that could have failed.
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Old 05-08-2017, 01:26 PM
 
4,275 posts, read 8,024,678 times
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It seems like it. I recently threw out a dead 2 year old microwave oven and a 3 year old TV. Even if something doesn't completely die, part of it would break off. Had to get rid of a 1.5 year old electric air fryer because the coating inside flaked off.

They don't make them like they used to anymore. It's like they build things so they last just a little longer than the one year guarantee.
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Old 05-08-2017, 01:39 PM
 
2,909 posts, read 1,709,430 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
This might not sound like a direct answer, but invest in a whole house surge protector. The changes from electro-mechanical components, which are robust, to electronic control circuitry, which can be damaged by surges, means more failures.
Any decent appliance with electronic controls will have surge protection built in. Besides, a whole house surge protector will not protect things if the pulse is generated inside the house, which an EMP from a nearby lightning strike can do.

Sure, a whole house protector will do no harm, and might help in lightning prone areas, but it is not a total solution.
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Old 05-08-2017, 04:29 PM
 
Location: Mount Laurel
4,169 posts, read 9,416,868 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
In the past I have, in fact have replaced heating elements and belts on dryers, ignition on a gas stove, washing machine parts. The problem is that now they have so many electronics, everything has a mother board and several processors in it, and it takes special equipment to diagnose the problem. I'm not going to throw parts at it. For both of these problems, the internet sites such as the one you gave list 3-5 different parts that could have failed.

Correct. you need to test each of those parts first. Don't just go and order the parts.
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Old 05-09-2017, 09:10 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
30,885 posts, read 56,300,624 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sj08054 View Post
Correct. you need to test each of those parts first. Don't just go and order the parts.
I have a technician coming tomorrow. Fortunately the minimum call to diagnose is reduced by 50% for the 2nd appliance. We'll most likely fix the dryer, but whether we fix the dishwasher or buy a new one depends on the estimate. Last night I put the dryer back together so that he can take it apart again.
I figured he would need to see the problem.
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Old 05-09-2017, 09:26 AM
 
138 posts, read 120,662 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbear99 View Post
Sure, a whole house protector will do no harm, and might help in lightning prone areas, but it is not a total solution.
Correct. An IEEE Standard even defines it with numbers. A properly earthed 'whole house' solution will only do 99.5% to 99.9% of the protection. IEEE then says, "...a 99.5% protection level will reduce the incidence of direct strokes from one stroke per 30 years ... to one stroke per 6000 years ... Protection at 99.5% is the practical choice."

Then plug-in protectors add maybe 0.2% more protection - often only from surges that should be made irrelevant by protection already inside every appliances.

No protector does protection. A 'whole house' protector is effective because it connects low impedance (ie less than 10 feet) to an item that does the protection - single point earth ground. A protector is only a connecting device to what actually absorbs surges - ie hundreds of thousands of joules.

Best protection at each appliance is already inside. Concern is for rare transients (maybe once every seven years) that might overwhelm that protection. Even 100 years ago, the informed properly earthed 'whole house' protection. The solution is that old and that well proven.

A protector is only as effective as its earth ground. Knowledge has not changed in over 100 years. Above numbers say why and how much.
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