U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Consumer Electronics
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-21-2017, 03:57 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
11,844 posts, read 13,973,633 times
Reputation: 8083

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbear99 View Post
You do need to connect the antenna to the radio.
Well, apparently I am about to learn something. Sweet. How does an antenna help a radio pull in stations... without being connected to it?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-21-2017, 04:38 PM
 
2,904 posts, read 1,707,067 times
Reputation: 2988
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peregrine View Post
Well, apparently I am about to learn something. Sweet. How does an antenna help a radio pull in stations... without being connected to it?
It doesn't. The earlier comment was highly theoretical. In order to have a useful passive reflector, you'd need to know the signal polarization, direction to the station (and you only get to choose one..) and such.

In the real world, you connect the antenna to the radio via terminals on the back. If it does not have the terminals, no go.

Also keep in mind that you'll be using a small indoor antenna, rabbit ears or some other design, and they're cheap enough that you can buy two. You don't need a splitter and long length of cord.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2017, 10:05 PM
 
Location: Sarasota FL
6,865 posts, read 9,549,202 times
Reputation: 6592
According to the age of the receiver, if old, it may already have an AM 'antenna' attached on the rear. If newer, like mine, it came with a separate small looped plastic square with wires attached with a small lead that is attached to the AM 'ant' screws. Mine has no problem with stations 60 miles away.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-22-2017, 02:58 AM
 
10,169 posts, read 10,497,864 times
Reputation: 5450
Quote:
Originally Posted by jacqueg View Post
Yeah, those rabbit ears...Upon looking at what's available at the local hardware store, the rabbit ears they carry are VHF only. The VHF/UHF antennas the store carries are leaf antennas, and I can get a splitter too, so I'll probably try that.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbear99 View Post
The important fact for the OP is that a VHF antenna (unless it's one of the highly directional tuned yagis?) will work. You gave the "why" without really explaining "why" which is because the FM band sits between the two VHF TV bands, so any antenna that covers both lower and upper VHF TV bands should cover FM too.
Yes. FM radio is in a frequency band between TV channels 5 & 6 so any VHF channel will be fine for FM radio as well.

UHF television is in another band entirely.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-22-2017, 08:11 AM
 
10,169 posts, read 10,497,864 times
Reputation: 5450
Quote:
Originally Posted by PacoMartin View Post
Yes. FM radio is in a frequency band between TV channels 5 & 6 so any VHF channel will be fine for FM radio as well.
Correction: FM radio is between TV channels 6&7.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-22-2017, 09:53 AM
 
2,904 posts, read 1,707,067 times
Reputation: 2988
Quote:
Originally Posted by PacoMartin View Post
Correction: FM radio is between TV channels 6&7.
Oh, that's useful knowledge?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-22-2017, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Sarasota FL
6,865 posts, read 9,549,202 times
Reputation: 6592
^^^^^
He corrected himself so that a smarta$$ didn't get on here and call him a liar and he didn't know what he was talking about.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-24-2017, 11:42 PM
 
10,169 posts, read 10,497,864 times
Reputation: 5450
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbear99 View Post
You gave the "why" without really explaining "why" which is because the FM band sits between the two VHF TV bands, so any antenna that covers both lower and upper VHF TV bands should cover FM too.
He said that I should have pointed out that the FM band sits between the two VHF TV bands so I re-posted
Quote:
Originally Posted by d4g4m View Post
He corrected himself so that a smarta$$ didn't get on here and call him a liar and he didn't know what he was talking about.
Thank you. I made an error and corrected myself.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbear99
Oh, that's useful knowledge?
Still not a happy camper.

It's useful to know that FM radio is in the original post WWII TV frequencies which are now the noisiest. So many times you can't pick up a signal through no fault of your antenna. It is also helpful to know which part of the antenna you are using since most antennas have a separate VHF and UHF section.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-25-2017, 09:46 PM
 
Location: Sarasota FL
6,865 posts, read 9,549,202 times
Reputation: 6592
Even though you live in an area that uses channels 2-13, you may no longer need a long element [VHF] antenna. When TV's went digital, the FCC re-assigned transmission frequencies. All channels 2-6 have new frequencies, so the long elements are no longer needed. Some channels 7-13 were allowed to keep their frequencies, so half size element antenna may be needed. If all channels [2-13] in a viewing area have new frequencies in the 14 to 69 range, a VHF antenna will receive all channels.
You can see assigned frequencies at antennaweb.org
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-26-2017, 02:45 AM
 
Location: Eugene, Oregon
9,489 posts, read 3,253,152 times
Reputation: 14405
Here's a link to plans and instructions at Popular Mechanics, for a TV antenna that I made. It's works well indoors, for all the local stations, that are as much as 20 miles away, at two different locations. I'm sure it would also work for FM radio. Most AM radios have built-in antennas that are adequate. I used 4-gauge wire, that is heavier than what they describe and it holds its shape better. I used twist-on electric wire connectors, for the wire tips, to reduce the risk of eye damage, if you walk into it, in the dark.

Watch Television For Free - DIY Digital TV Antenna
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Consumer Electronics
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top