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Old 07-10-2017, 12:43 PM
 
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Blueray disks have much more sophisticated anti-copy protections, so I'm not surprised some are hard to rip. But why rip anyway? You get large files. If you transcode to a smaller file size you lose resolution. So why even do Blueray? I guess because you already have them. If you can't rip one, remember that Google is your friend!
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Old 07-10-2017, 01:55 PM
 
Location: McAllen, TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skinsguy37 View Post
Not sure what this has to do with ripping DVDs and Blu-Rays?
It's legal to make backup copies of movies you own. Ripping movies makes a "digital" copy of it which can be played through a media player, on a portable device etc etc. It's also a lot easier than finding a disc, putting it into a dvd player. With a digital copy, you just select the files and start playing it. You can also store many moves on one hard drive or flash drive or whatever.
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Old 07-10-2017, 02:01 PM
 
Location: McAllen, TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skinsguy37 View Post
I'll check out DVD Decrypter too and see if it's still available. I'm not opposed to using AnyDVD HD, even if there is a cost, but certainly if the free apps can do the job, I'll just use those. Right now, I'm just testing with two titles. One on a regular DVD, and the other on BluRay. I would love a way for the DVDs to look upconverted like they do when I play them back in my Playstation, but they didn't quite look so upconverted when I tried this in the past using Plex.
DVD Decryptor has not been updated in many years making it totally useless for any "newer" moves with new types of protection. It will work with many older titles. Any DVD is periodically updated to support the newest encryption technologies. So it all depends.
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Old 07-10-2017, 02:09 PM
 
Location: McAllen, TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbear99 View Post
Blueray disks have much more sophisticated anti-copy protections, so I'm not surprised some are hard to rip. But why rip anyway? You get large files. If you transcode to a smaller file size you lose resolution. So why even do Blueray? I guess because you already have them. If you can't rip one, remember that Google is your friend!
The standard for ripping blurays is MKV. You choose your own compression level. When you compress you typically don't lose resolution. A common way of making files smaller without losing resolution is reducing bitrate. You won't get the same level of detail but still get the full resolution like 1080p. It still makes for enjoyable viewing experience.
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Old 07-10-2017, 02:50 PM
 
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Originally Posted by gguerra View Post
It's legal to make backup copies of movies you own. Ripping movies makes a "digital" copy of it which can be played through a media player, on a portable device etc etc..
Title I of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. 17 U.S.C. 1201 makes this illegal to circumvent DRM, so making backup copies isillegal.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gguerra View Post
The standard for ripping blurays is MKV. You choose your wn compression level. When you compress you typically don't lose resolution. A common way of making files smaller without losing resolution is reducing bitrate. You won't get the same level of detail but still get the full resolution like 1080p. It still makes for enjoyable viewing experience.
While you can compress without losing resolution, you lose bit depth for colors, so you get color banding of skys etc. I see color banding all the time on compressed streams.

You can only really talk about MKV by talking about the encoder within, since MKV is just a container, somewhat like .AVI. Lossless compression is hard to do, so folks depend on lossy compression. Some vendors claim "no loss of quality" which is pretty subjective, see above. You can get higher lossless compression at the cost of CPU load for coding/decoding, so you don't see it much. Who wants something only usable on a I7 machine with lots of memory?
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Old 07-10-2017, 04:00 PM
 
Location: Greensboro, NC
5,894 posts, read 4,420,163 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbear99 View Post
Blueray disks have much more sophisticated anti-copy protections, so I'm not surprised some are hard to rip. But why rip anyway? You get large files. If you transcode to a smaller file size you lose resolution. So why even do Blueray? I guess because you already have them. If you can't rip one, remember that Google is your friend!
I have them, yes. I simply want to have them ripped to the computer and then streamed to my TV via Plex so that I can have easier access to my personal library of movies and TV shows. Any loss of picture quality isn't going to be enough to ruin the experience. And I still have the physical disc if I want to be anal about picture quality.
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Old 07-10-2017, 04:05 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skinsguy37 View Post
I have them, yes. I simply want to have them ripped to the computer and then streamed to my TV via Plex so that I can have easier access to my personal library of movies and TV shows. Any loss of picture quality isn't going to be enough to ruin the experience. And I still have the physical disc if I want to be anal about picture quality.
Makes perfect sense. Good luck. A good resource for you, maybe mentioned already, is https://www.avforums.com/forums/

I've been visiting them for about 15 years, and can attest that they're perfectly legit, and will steer you to good software.
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Old 07-10-2017, 05:48 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidt1 View Post
These days broadcast TV shows are in 1080 and 720, which can be legally recorded. I have recorded hundreds of TV shows in HD including many movies.
You can record them for later viewing once but you are not entitled to build a library with them.
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Old 07-10-2017, 06:06 PM
 
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IIRC, recording high def broadcast TV is very difficult except with a DVR. You might want to look up "Copy Control Information", which is part of most digital video streams. I believe the Digital Millenium Copyright Act comes into play here, so no one will be manufacturing the equipment you'd need for an archived copy. DVRs have licensed functionality that essentially allows "copy once" for time shifting only.
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Old 07-11-2017, 01:35 AM
 
4,263 posts, read 8,017,770 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thecoalman View Post
You can record them for later viewing once but you are not entitled to build a library with them.
Under the "fair use" rule as long as I am not making money or making public showings, it is permitted to keep DVR recordings for personal viewings. Even companies like Comcast tell their customers they can keep DVR recordings for as long as they want.

https://www.quora.com/Comcast-How-lo...DVR-recordings

https://support.philo.com/hc/en-us/a...my-recordings-

https://www.avvo.com/legal-answers/i...r--550100.html

https://law.stackexchange.com/questi...ies-or-a-movie
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