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Old 07-18-2017, 06:47 PM
 
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Used to live in Wash, DC proper. There were stations we could not get because we were on the wrong side of a hill. It happens.
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Old 07-18-2017, 06:59 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheGrandK-Man View Post
Need to elevate antenna at least to height of grade above your mounting point.
I had it up on the roof on a temporary pole and tried it in a few different locations. I'm sure the neighbors were laughing their asses off watching me walk around with an extension cord, a small TV and this antenna on a pole while I was on the roof. There is no way to get it any higher.

There is one station antenna I can get very near the two stations stations I can't get, I'm guessing a better antenna might work. I'd spend the money if I knew it would work but it's a gamble.
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Old 07-18-2017, 08:11 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skinsguy37 View Post
Anyway, One TV antenna that I have seen that seems to be popular is one made by a company called Lava, which is one of those made from China that promises up to 150 miles or reception.

However, with some of the reviews I've read on Amazon, the antenna really got, mostly, 20 miles of reception, and only UHF channels. Of course, experience varies depending on location.

You could probably get any antenna to receive from 150 miles away if your broadcast tower was 3 miles high on a mountaintop near shore and you were in a boat.

Up to about 40 miles when the curvature of earth takes effect for most people, a lot depends on intermediate hills. Google Earth will let you draw an elevation profile from your house to the broadcast tower which will tell you a lot.

Philadelphia 8 broadcast towers in Roxborough section of city


For example, I am 42 miles from Philadelphia broadcast towers which are on a hill about 320' high with towers up to 1250' tall. My elevation is 360'. Now I could probably receive those signals fine if there was no topography between us, but there is two roughly 1000' tall hills right in the path about 10 miles from me. No antenna in the world is going to work.

Last edited by PacoMartin; 07-18-2017 at 09:35 PM..
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Old 07-19-2017, 12:25 AM
 
Location: Sarasota FL
6,865 posts, read 9,547,977 times
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I have an old fashion 1950's tech, 20 year old antenna [HD antenna is advertising hype] in the attic above the garage which faces north. Lucky me that the towers are at 15-17 degrees and 38 miles, very flat terrain. No problem receiving 17 primes and about 3 dozen subs.
If you go to antennaweb.org look to see what frequencies the channels in your area are using [even if you have 2-13 channels] If the frequencies are above 13, you can use only a uhf antenna.
The further the transmission tower, the higher your antenna must be mounted. [and with no obstructions between tower and antenna.] Curvature of earth- when you are at the beach [Atlantic, Pacific, Gulf and looking at the water, the furthest your eyes are seeing is about 15 miles on the horizon]
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Old 07-19-2017, 07:02 AM
 
Location: Removing a snake out of the neighbor's washing machine
2,366 posts, read 961,628 times
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Another excellent reference for fellow cord-cutters and antenna heads:
TV Fool
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Old 07-19-2017, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Greensboro, NC
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I've been to TV Fool and Antenna Web several times. Been researching and trying out various, inexpensive options. I was able to pick up Virginia local channels that are around 70 miles away, with a little homemade antenna perched on my back deck railing. There are three VA channels that I, periodically receive, depending on where at I have the antenna sitting on the deck: WDBJ 7 (CBS Roanoke), WSLS 10 (NBC Roanoke), and FOX 21/27 out of Roanoke. I receive all of the Greensboro NC locals without issues. The Roanoke Fox station is the one I usually try to get, and in the past couple of years, I was able to pick it up, about 70% of the time on Sunday afternoon during football season. Last year, that % dropped to about 45% of the time, and this year, I haven't been able to pick it up at all. Seeing as how we're just a couple months away from the start of the regular NFL season, I'm trying to see if there is something different I can do before I go out and spend $100 on a roof top antenna.

Now, having said all of that, keep in mind, I was able to tune in those Roanoke stations with a homemade antenna that is perched on my back deck. Those Roanoke stations are more than 70 miles away. Now, they may have some repeaters setup in various locations, and so I might be getting a signal off of one of those repeaters that are closer to me. I don't know how that specifically works. All I know is, it seems possible to pick up stations that are 70 miles out from me. As far as my terrain, it's not very hilly, but I'm at the end of our road and there are woods with tall trees at the end of our road. We do seem to be on somewhat of a hill, which I think helps us. However, again, we're at the end of our road, and there are houses on our other side.

My thought process is that if I can get long distance channels with the setup I have now, even though that success is about 60% on average, I would think a good roof top antenna would increase that line of sight, since the antenna would be higher. I've been told that it's actually harder for satellite dishes and that direct line of sight is a must for them, and obviously, I was able to get DirecTV with no issues.
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Old 07-19-2017, 08:56 PM
 
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You need a power amplified antenna to receive the most channels. I have 3 tvs all with power amplified antennas and two of the tv's get 36 channels and one tv gets 46 channels. I live about 35 miles from Philadelphia where a lot of channels broadcast from.
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Old 07-20-2017, 04:38 AM
 
Location: Removing a snake out of the neighbor's washing machine
2,366 posts, read 961,628 times
Reputation: 1767
Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie1278 View Post
You need a power amplified antenna to receive the most channels. I have 3 tvs all with power amplified antennas and two of the tv's get 36 channels and one tv gets 46 channels. I live about 35 miles from Philadelphia where a lot of channels broadcast from.
I guess I live in an area with excellent LOS(Line Of Sight): Amplification makes no difference where I live, and even loses channels for me - overload input stage.
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Old 07-20-2017, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Greensboro, NC
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It's really going to be a different story depending on your location, terrain, and how many miles you are from the towers. If you live where there's no mountains and thick woods, you can probably pick up most anything with the minimal setup. If you're living on top of a mountain but still have a clear line of sight, you can probably still pick up very good reception. But, if you're living in a valley, surrounded by thick woods, and/or rural area where the towers are the next town or two over, that gets difficult and you need amps.

I can pick up most of the main local NC channels with the very minimum setup. However, getting the VA local channels is a bit more of a challenge, but it's very possible where I live. Only thing is, the trees that are around me will cause a lot of pix-elation when it's windy, because the signals are coming in around the trees and getting bounced around. However, on a clear, calm day, I can pick up just about anything, or at least I used to.

I've also been using the pre-amp that DirecTV left behind. I tested with and without it, and I definitely get better reception with it. And when I say better reception, I mean channels I easily get don't get pixelated, but will sometimes without it. Also, I'll pick up a few extra channels with the DirecTV pre-amp. It may not be as good as other pre-amps, but it saves me some cash if it gets the job done.
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