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Old 08-26-2017, 07:33 PM
 
1,882 posts, read 2,887,779 times
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Hi folks, I put up a thread a few weeks back asking about a setup to play various formats on a DVD player. Well, I got a different DVD player and a number of files play on it, but some don't. Specifically, Xvid avi and mpg plays, but of course MP4 and MKV do not. So I have set out to go through my huge collection of films, convert them into the above formats and reburn. Bought a spindle of a 100 discs and am already running into huge problems. Hoping someone can help me.

I have used MPEG Streamclip, Handbrake, Miro, Anyconverter, and ISkysoft Video converter with varying degrees of success. Much of the time my conversions are ridiculously large (as in a 200 mb file coming out to 5 gb), they don't fill the screen (black borders) or in the case of Anyconverter, speeds it up and garbles the whole thing. MPEG streamclip really takes WAYYYYYYYY too long to render from MP4, as in hours, then hangs up. Then, when it is successful, makes HUGE files as well that are just useless. 4GB for a half hour program! And then often, it won't play on the DVD player. Handbrake also hangs up, and is the only converter i have used that constantly puts out of sync the audio and video. I don't know why that is but it happens 60 percent of the time.
I have figured out that AVI and MPG are the only formats to use, and the aspect ratios of AVI that will work. What i am really wanting now is a converter than is cheap or free that can let me tweak the AVI settings more than the programs I have used so far and gives yo ua decent sized file without making something huge. If anyone has any experience with video conversion and knows of a great program that they would reccomend please do so! and thank you.
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Old 08-27-2017, 08:22 AM
 
Location: (six-cent-dix-sept)
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xvidenc / h264enc give me joy.
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Old 08-27-2017, 01:29 PM
 
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Can't recommend software because I've been using more standard codecs for years.

Problem #1 (and maybe 2,3 and 4) is that MKV, AVI and MP4 are containers, which hold the contents made by codecs, so you need to figure out your codecs first, and which container/codec combinations are supported by your player. Problem #2 is aspect ratios, which is why things "don't fill the screen". Problem #3 is that highly compressed video, when transcoded into a less compressed format like MPEG-2, will "grow". How much depends on the compression settings for the source material and output. The wrong codec (or wrong codec settings), for example can give you a monster .avi file.

You might want to spend some time reading up on video wrappers and codecs, and how to handle them. AVS forum has lots of good, reliabe information, and plentiful software links.
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Old 08-27-2017, 02:33 PM
 
40,263 posts, read 41,823,633 times
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One thing to be aware of is any conversion of video is all down hill, every conversions takes a little bit of the quality with it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nighthouse66 View Post
Much of the time my conversions are ridiculously large (as in a 200 mb file coming out to 5 gb),
"DVD Video" is a specification, the benefit is it will play on any DVD video player. It's converting it to MPEG2 which is the only format that is supported for DVD Video, it's old codec and not very efficient. It will also be converting the resolution because there is specification for that too. Both of these lead to much larger file sizes especially if your source video has small resolution.

Any other format supported by the player you have is an extra feature added by the manufacturer.

The specs and resolution can be found here, scroll down a bit it under technical specs:

https://www.videohelp.com/dvd

You should try and match the output resolution as closely as you can to input the resolution.


Quote:
they don't fill the screen (black borders)
This can be caused by multiple issues and how to proceed varies depending on the source of them. First examine your source video and make sure they are not present in the video itself. If they are present there is not a whole lot of good options to get it to work properly other than cropping before conversion.

This can also be caused by conversion. Suppose the video is 16:9 and the converter puts it on 4:3 video matte adding black bars top and bottom and sets the flag as 4:3. The result is the issue I just mentioned. Make sure you are using the correct setting on the converter according to the source.

Thirdly DVD video aspects 16:9 and 4:3 share the same resolution, anamorphic... look it up. Both aspects fill the entire video frame and if viewed raw the 16:9 is going to have round shapes that look like eggs and people will look taller and skinny. The only time there should be black bars in a DVD video file is when the aspect of the source video is wider than the 16:9 aspect.

There is 4:3 or 16:9 flag set on the video, the DVD player reads that flag. Assuming you have your DVD player set up correctly for the aspect of your TV it will add black bars. If it's a widescreen TV it will pillar box 4:3 video adding black bars left and right, 16:9 is displayed full screen. If it's older CRT TV it will letterbox the 16:9 adding black bars top and bottom, the 4:3 is output full screen.




.
Quote:
I have figured out that AVI and MPG are the only formats to use,
AVI is not format, it's video container file that can contain video encoded with many different formats including mpeg. If you are going to use AVI you need to make sure the codec used is supported by your player.

Quote:
If anyone has any experience with video conversion and knows of a great program that they would reccomend please do so! and thank you.
Try Video Studio, 30 day trial and I'm pretty sure there is no limitations for what you need it for.
https://www.videostudiopro.com/en/
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Old 08-27-2017, 05:32 PM
 
40,263 posts, read 41,823,633 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thecoalman View Post
"DVD Video" is a specification, the benefit is it will play on any DVD video player.
Just to add MPEG2 itself is only the video specification, there is also specific folder and file structure for "DVD video". Burning a MPEG2 as data file will be supported on most video players but does not all DVD players. Like the additional formats a player may support this is a feature added by the manufacturer outside of the "DVD Video" spec.
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Old 08-27-2017, 06:49 PM
 
2,903 posts, read 1,705,039 times
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^ Actually, for an MPEG 2 to be playable on a DVD player, that is to make a true DVD, one needs much more processing and multiple files. That's what DVD authoring programs do. You can read the Wikipedia article https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DVD-Video to get a full description. The file system discussion https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DVD-Video is especially important. And as explained above, pay attention to aspect ratios in your DVD authoring.

Some DVD players will handle a MPEG2 encoded file in a wrapper, usually AVI. Some will handle straight MPEG2. You need to check the specs and perhaps do a test disk.
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Old 08-27-2017, 06:59 PM
 
1,882 posts, read 2,887,779 times
Reputation: 3893
Quote:
Originally Posted by thecoalman View Post
One thing to be aware of is any conversion of video is all down hill, every conversions takes a little bit of the quality with it.



"DVD Video" is a specification, the benefit is it will play on any DVD video player. It's converting it to MPEG2 which is the only format that is supported for DVD Video, it's old codec and not very efficient. It will also be converting the resolution because there is specification for that too. Both of these lead to much larger file sizes especially if your source video has small resolution.

Any other format supported by the player you have is an extra feature added by the manufacturer.

The specs and resolution can be found here, scroll down a bit it under technical specs:

https://www.videohelp.com/dvd

You should try and match the output resolution as closely as you can to input the resolution.


This can be caused by multiple issues and how to proceed varies depending on the source of them. First examine your source video and make sure they are not present in the video itself. If they are present there is not a whole lot of good options to get it to work properly other than cropping before conversion.

This can also be caused by conversion. Suppose the video is 16:9 and the converter puts it on 4:3 video matte adding black bars top and bottom and sets the flag as 4:3. The result is the issue I just mentioned. Make sure you are using the correct setting on the converter according to the source.

Thirdly DVD video aspects 16:9 and 4:3 share the same resolution, anamorphic... look it up. Both aspects fill the entire video frame and if viewed raw the 16:9 is going to have round shapes that look like eggs and people will look taller and skinny. The only time there should be black bars in a DVD video file is when the aspect of the source video is wider than the 16:9 aspect.

There is 4:3 or 16:9 flag set on the video, the DVD player reads that flag. Assuming you have your DVD player set up correctly for the aspect of your TV it will add black bars. If it's a widescreen TV it will pillar box 4:3 video adding black bars left and right, 16:9 is displayed full screen. If it's older CRT TV it will letterbox the 16:9 adding black bars top and bottom, the 4:3 is output full screen.




.
AVI is not format, it's video container file that can contain video encoded with many different formats including mpeg. If you are going to use AVI you need to make sure the codec used is supported by your player.

Try Video Studio, 30 day trial and I'm pretty sure there is no limitations for what you need it for.
https://www.videostudiopro.com/en/
WOW! Thank you so much for that info. Very comprehensive. Thank you muchly!
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Old 08-28-2017, 09:12 AM
 
40,263 posts, read 41,823,633 times
Reputation: 16785
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbear99 View Post
^ Actually, for an MPEG 2 to be playable on a DVD player, that is to make a true DVD, one needs much more processing and multiple files.
That what was meant by specific folder and file structure.
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Old 08-28-2017, 10:24 AM
 
Location: McAllen, TX
3,983 posts, read 2,619,480 times
Reputation: 4749
Easier and cheaper (in the long run) is to get a solution that plays everything without having to convert. This is all unless you don't work and you have a lot of time on your hands. Why even use a DVD player? DVD Players are still in use but basically obsolete unless you want to play something from disc. IF you want to play from a digital version (a file), get a modern up to date media player or mini pc or laptop.
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