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Old 03-23-2008, 01:20 PM
 
1 posts, read 13,579 times
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ok, i need some help from someone that knows about these things.

basically i have a stereo system that was cutting-edge...in the 80's. (sony integrated stereo amplifier ta-d507) i do have more modern bose speakers, but i don't know if that matters at all.

since my pc speakers are crap for listening to music, i thought i might use my stereo system to play songs off my ipod. this way i don't have to switch cd's all the time either.

so, is there any way i could hook my ipod up to my amp/speakers?

thanks in advance.
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Old 03-23-2008, 01:48 PM
 
Location: HoCo, MD
4,592 posts, read 8,197,396 times
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I have an older receiver that I put in the home gym for music. I'm using an headphone adapter from Radio Shack with the ipod.. its basically a headphone jack on one end, and stereo RCA jacks on the other. So the headphone jack goes in the ipod dock, and the RCA's can go on any input (R/L) you have available on the receiver.

It works fine, you just can't control the ipod at all from the amp remote. I typically just set it to a playlist, and let it run.
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Old 03-23-2008, 07:09 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
1,368 posts, read 6,015,183 times
Reputation: 536
^ what Macroy said.
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Old 03-23-2008, 07:13 PM
 
Location: Not far from Fairbanks, AK
16,723 posts, read 29,318,076 times
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Another option is to use an FM transmitter. Most transmitters are designed for using in the car, and have a cigarette-lighter plug. These are good for systems that don't come with an iPod adapter (more on that later). Some other transmitters use the power from the iPod to work, but this discharges the iPod's battery faster. For the car, get a FM transmitter with a cigarette-lighter plug, since both the iPod and the transmitter use battery power from your car, and at the same time maintains the iPod fully charged.

Have you seen the very small 12-volt DC transformers that you plug on the electrical outlet, the ones that have a cigarette lighter socket built-in? I have one of those, so I just plug the transmitter's plug into the transformer's cigarette-lighter socket, and then the transmitter's plug into the iPod's receptacle at the bottom (below the Click Wheel). This is what I do after that:

Turn the receiver ON to a weak FM station, or one that is not transmitting that day, and then tune the transmitter (according to the instructions that came with it), to the station I tuned the receiver to. Now, I play a song, and get the iPod, with the transmitter attached, somewhere near the receiver until the signal is clear. You may have to move the iPod/transmitter around until the music sounds as clear as you want.

Buy a good transmitter, not the cheap one. Don't buy a transmitter that requires using batteries for it. Those don't work very well most times.
--------
Other than that, most new receivers for the home as well as automobiles are iPod ready. Some come with an Ipod cable, while in some others the cable (or a docking station with cable for the home), is optional.
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Old 03-23-2008, 07:17 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
1,368 posts, read 6,015,183 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RayinAK View Post
Another option is to use an FM transmitter. Most transmitters are designed for using in the car, and have a cigarette-lighter plug. These are good for systems that don't come with an iPod adapter (more on that later). Some other transmitters use the power from the iPod to work, but this discharges the iPod's battery faster. For the car, get a FM transmitter with a cigarette-lighter plug, since both the iPod and the transmitter use battery power from your car, and at the same time maintains the iPod fully charged.

Have you seen the very small 12-volt DC transformers that you plug on the electrical outlet, the ones that have a cigarette lighter socket built-in? I have one of those, so I just plug the transmitter into the transformer's socket, and then the transmitter into the iPod's plug at bottom (below the Click Wheel). This is what I do after that:

Turn the receiver ON to a weak FM station, or one that is not transmitting that day, and then tune the transmitter (according to the instructions that came with it), to the station I tuned the receiver to. Now, I play a song, and get the iPod, with the transmitter attached, somewhere near the receiver until the signal is clear. You may have to move the iPod/transmitter around until the music sounds as clear as you want.

Buy a good transmitter, not the cheap one. Don't buy a transmitter that requires using batteries for it. Those don't work very well most times.
--------
Other than that, most new receivers for the home as well as automobiles are iPod ready. Some come with an Ipod cable, while in some others the cable (or a docking station with cable for the home), is optional.
If you get a big enough transmitter, you can actually broadcast your iPod to I think its a mile before you have to get a license from the FCC? But yeah, I've pulled up next to people at streetlights and been tuned to like 89.5 or something and gotten their iPod signal.
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Old 03-24-2008, 01:00 AM
 
Location: Fairbanks Alaska
1,677 posts, read 5,904,910 times
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The rca connection is the way to go as they will pass more frequencies. FM by the standard cut off highs over 15k hz and cut off lows also I believe. Still better than AM.

The other option is using a docking station with outputs for the stereo. This eliminates the need to adjust the volume on the front of the ipod to get sufficient audio out. Never use full output as distortion may be induced. The dock will cost lots of $ so the cable is the best solution available.


On a related subject, I have tried a wireless feed to my stereo from the computer for music. The product I used was a linksys which was on sale for 50% off. Now I know why, but I do get it to work most the time. I use the digital output as the RCA outputs was too weak and the box didn't reproduce the audio very well. Surely someone makes a better product than this one. It was a model wmb54g.
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Old 03-24-2008, 02:43 AM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
1,368 posts, read 6,015,183 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcticthaw View Post
The rca connection is the way to go as they will pass more frequencies. FM by the standard cut off highs over 15k hz and cut off lows also I believe. Still better than AM.

The other option is using a docking station with outputs for the stereo. This eliminates the need to adjust the volume on the front of the ipod to get sufficient audio out. Never use full output as distortion may be induced. The dock will cost lots of $ so the cable is the best solution available.


On a related subject, I have tried a wireless feed to my stereo from the computer for music. The product I used was a linksys which was on sale for 50% off. Now I know why, but I do get it to work most the time. I use the digital output as the RCA outputs was too weak and the box didn't reproduce the audio very well. Surely someone makes a better product than this one. It was a model wmb54g.
May be induced? I have just a mini-stereo to mini-stereo for my car, and I hook my iPod to it, and if its at full volume, distortion like made. Turn it down just a smidge, and its solid. Its incredible.
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Old 03-29-2008, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Charlotte. Or Detroit.
1,455 posts, read 3,689,102 times
Reputation: 3269
I use a minijack-to-rca connection on my main system, but I have an older Pioneer system in my bedroom that has a cassette deck and for that I use a cassette adaptor. Works just fine. So that's another option, if by chance you have a cassette deck.
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Old 03-29-2008, 03:58 PM
 
4,557 posts, read 9,853,289 times
Reputation: 3892
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcticthaw View Post
On a related subject, I have tried a wireless feed to my stereo from the computer for music. The product I used was a linksys which was on sale for 50% off. Now I know why, but I do get it to work most the time. I use the digital output as the RCA outputs was too weak and the box didn't reproduce the audio very well. Surely someone makes a better product than this one. It was a model wmb54g.
We use Airport Express with itunes and I love it. I think it sounds like it's along the same lines. But you do have to use itunes. I love being able to pump my whole music collection through the stereo downstairs!
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Old 02-06-2013, 11:37 PM
 
1 posts, read 4,909 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcticthaw View Post
The rca connection is the way to go as they will pass more frequencies. FM by the standard cut off highs over 15k hz and cut off lows also I believe. Still better than AM.

The other option is using a docking station with outputs for the stereo. This eliminates the need to adjust the volume on the front of the ipod to get sufficient audio out. Never use full output as distortion may be induced. The dock will cost lots of $ so the cable is the best solution available.


On a related subject, I have tried a wireless feed to my stereo from the computer for ipod music. The product I used was a linksys which was on sale for 50% off. Now I know why, but I do get it to work most the time. I use the digital output as the RCA outputs was too weak and the box didn't reproduce the audio very well. Surely someone makes a better product than this one. It was a model wmb54g.
You could most definitely get by with a mini-plug to r/l RCA analog plugs as you stated. There are also many third-party iPod docks (such manufacturers such as Belkin, Griffin, DLO, and others) that you just set the iPod in (the female port on the bottom of your iPod would attach to the male connector in the dock), and you can navigate your music on your TV. These have either a y-connector, composite video and audio cables, or R/L stereo analog and S-Video cable outputs. This also charges your iPod while it's in it. Don't fall for the "iPod-compatible" marketing ploy and buy a new receiver. All these third-party docks work fine in an open input on any receiver with composite/S-video inputs.
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