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Old 06-24-2019, 03:42 PM
 
Location: Buckeye, Arizona
304 posts, read 134,035 times
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We are moving soon to a new home in a retirement community. Many of the current neighbors have highly suggested switching to streaming TV instead of cable -- we have used Cox for 32 years.


Here is my dilemma . . . my wife has never been too techie when it comes to the remote control even for Cox. Because of radiation cancer treatment that is even more pronounced for her than ever before. If we can program the remote to basically get her to the stations she prefers all will be fine, but if there are too many gyrations and options that pop up on screen or on the remote it will be way too confusing. She has about six channels she typically will cycle through. Is it feasible to think that we can program the remote to go to her "favorites" with one button and then choose a channel from there and avoid anything else?
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Old 06-24-2019, 07:15 PM
 
Location: Michigan
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What specific channels are her "favorites"? Can you name all of them?
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Old 06-24-2019, 07:20 PM
 
Location: San Diego
36,708 posts, read 33,187,094 times
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If the ISP is the same you can simply call them to help you with their data line.
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Old 06-24-2019, 09:44 PM
 
Location: Des Moines Metro
5,099 posts, read 6,270,211 times
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Look into DISH. They have the voice remote system. If you can afford it, that might be your best bet.

Streaming requires a fast internet and the knowledge of how to hook up your TV to Roku or whatever you're going to stream with. If you've got someone nearby who knows this stuff and will help you for free, take advantage of that.

For low-income seniors, I generally go to their house and get them set up with an indoor antenna and over-the-air TV (free) if they aren't far from the stations. This site is useful for that: TV Fool
Again, you may need someone to help you pick out an antenna and then set the TV to rescan for the channels. It isn't that hard, but a lot of folks have difficulty doing that.

One of these days, I'll get around to making a youtube about how to do this stuff! In the meantime, there are some youtubes about how to get a TV to re-scan channels.
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Old 06-25-2019, 04:13 AM
 
40,255 posts, read 41,815,454 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 4khansen View Post
If we can program the remote to basically get her to the stations she prefers all will be fine, but if there are too many gyrations and options that pop up on screen or on the remote it will be way too confusing.

You may want to try a better universal remote, the one I got my parents had "watch TV" button and this would turn on the TV, Cable box and sound system. The display on the remote then switched to list of TV stations you could customize and label. Any action could be programmed to single button even if there was multiple button presses using other remotes.



The only trouble they had with it was no discrete on and off for two devices. The same signal was for on/off. If a device missed a signal it could get out of sync with the remote. e.g. One device misses the signal and it's still on, pressing "all off" again would turn it off but turn the other device on.
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Old 06-25-2019, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
11,825 posts, read 13,966,567 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Meemur View Post
Streaming requires a fast internet and the knowledge of how to hook up your TV to Roku or whatever you're going to stream with. If you've got someone nearby who knows this stuff and will help you for free, take advantage of that.
So much wrong with this post.
You don't need FAST internet to stream to a TV or 2. A mere 15mb would suffice. I know...I had 15 for years.
And let's not make this sound like rocket science to setup a Roku.

OP: buy a Roku. Plug it in to your HDMI port on your TV. Follow the 3 pages of setup instructions. It may ask you to add a credit card. I don't remember if it still does that. They only do this IN CASE you want to pay for something through the Roku store. YOU WILL NOT BE CHARGED ANYTHING WITHOUT YOUR KNOWLEDGE. Don't be afriad to give it to them. This is SO EASY. 0 out of 5 on the difficulty scale.


Sign up for YouTube TV.
https://tv.youtube.com/welcome/
You can get a 7 day free trial.
I can bet this probably has all the channels you want.
The interface is JUST LIKE CABLE TV and the remote for the Roku...


couldn't be easier. 1 out of 5 on the difficulty scale.

On the Roku there's an option for adding new channels. Add the YouTube TV app. Sign in.
That's really it. You do the initial setup and I promise you your wife can understand and figure this out in less then 30 minutes. It really is easy. Really really easy.
Bonus: you can watch TV on your computer with it while she watches on the TV.

There's a 7 day free trial and no contracts so you can cancel anytime.
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Old 06-25-2019, 11:27 AM
 
Location: Buckeye, Arizona
304 posts, read 134,035 times
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Thanks for the feedback. My wife basically watches the broadcast channels, ABC, NBC, CBS, Fox and HGTV, Weather, CNN, ESPN etc. That's the routine. The cost and setup shouldn't be a problem. We pay $250+ a month as it is for Cox now, and I have no issues with getting as fast of internet as available. As long as we get a little assistance at the beginning and have someone get us started, I think all will be good. She does like the "voice" command that we have through COX now. So if that is available through the streaming services -- that would probably be a great option. Also, the home we purchased has a satellite dish. Not sure the current leasees have used it, but it is there.

I'm a bit more tech savvy so I don't get nearly as frustrated as she may.
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Old 06-25-2019, 04:32 PM
 
Location: Jollyville, TX
3,904 posts, read 9,579,957 times
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The first step is to decide what kind of streaming device to use. My personal favorite is the Roku with voice command. Roku also makes TV's which make the integration even more seamless. Once you have the device and set it up you can decide what kind of streaming packages you want. There are packages like Sling and Direct TV that mimic cable in that it's live and you can browse what's currently on. There are other ways to stream as well like Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime which are more "on demand" type viewing.

When we first switched to streaming it was hard to get used to sitting down in front of the TV and deciding what to watch rather than flipping through whatever cable was offering. The live streaming packages make that transition a little easier.

We actually kept cable and added streaming before we cut the cord with Spectrum and went to streaming only (after a massive price hike). We also have an antenna to bring in all the local networks for free. You can always set up the streaming with minimal cost and decide if you like it before you cancel cable.
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Old 06-26-2019, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
11,825 posts, read 13,966,567 times
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Good post Moonlady.
Like I said 4kHansen: you do not need a HIGH speed internet connection. I know what I'm talking about. I doubt anyone here has been a cord cutter as long as I have. I was an early 'cutter'. We ran 15mb on 2 TV's and my PC and it ran fine. I don't even think anyone offers 15mb today. You would be right as rain with a 25, or 50 which is probably the minimum your cable company offers. Don't let the internet company scare you into thinking you need a GIGABYTE. They will try.
As Moonlady said, there are 2 ways to go.
I recommended the YouTubeTV method because it is just like cable. This will be a much easier transition for the missus.
It's $50/month. +$60 or $70 a month for internet.
And it offers some ondemand content. And the one big advantage of YT-TV is it's the only service to offer unlimited DVR. You select a show, hit record, and you're off and running. Every time that show is on it will be recorded. Very cable tv like.

I would not recommend the Netflix, Hulu, Amazon route at this point until and unless you need more stuff to watch. Personally this is how I went. I can't go back to that cable style 'look around for something to watch'.
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Old 06-26-2019, 07:55 PM
 
Location: Independent Republic of Ballard
6,858 posts, read 5,327,615 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 4khansen View Post
Thanks for the feedback. My wife basically watches the broadcast channels, ABC, NBC, CBS, Fox and HGTV, Weather, CNN, ESPN etc. That's the routine. The cost and setup shouldn't be a problem. We pay $250+ a month as it is for Cox now, and I have no issues with getting as fast of internet as available. As long as we get a little assistance at the beginning and have someone get us started, I think all will be good. She does like the "voice" command that we have through COX now. So if that is available through the streaming services -- that would probably be a great option. Also, the home we purchased has a satellite dish. Not sure the current leasees have used it, but it is there.

I'm a bit more tech savvy so I don't get nearly as frustrated as she may.
The main difference is that the cable guide wraps everything up in a single interface, while the Roku/Netflix/Sling combo has multiple programming sources, including having to get local channels through an antenna.

One option is to step down to Cox's Contour TV Package ($69/mo.), which includes all of her local channels (ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox, PBS, CW, etc.), plus CNN, HGTV, The Weather Channel, ESPN/2, and a bunch of other channels, all of which she can access using the cable remote/guide. Then add a Roku for access to Netflix, Amazon Video, and Hulu, for which you can deal with the TV and Roku remotes.

https://www.cabletv.com/blog/basic-c...s-resource#cox

https://www.cabletv.com/cox/channel-lineup
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