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Old 10-03-2008, 01:33 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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I have been told that in fringe reception areas, HDTV will be "all or nothing"--that is, you will get a perfect picture if your signal is above a strength threshold, and nothing at all if that channel is below that threshold. Which mean, for some, an investment not only in a conversion box, but an expensive new antenna system, as well. Can anybody shed any light on this?
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Old 10-03-2008, 01:59 PM
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Location: Ohio
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All of what you posted is absolutely correct. Here's a TV engineer's explanation of why it's correct.

DTV in Layman's Terms - Demystifying the DTV/HDTV Issue

Quote:
...a digital signal (which is used for DTV) is able to produce a good picture regardless of the atmospheric conditions, signal level or terrain. This is because the digital signal is actually a series of codes and instructions that are deciphered by the DTV receiver (the set-top box you need to display the DTV signal). Regardless of the strength of the DTV signal, the codes are still the codes -- and the receiver doesn't care if they are strong or weak (as long as they are strong enough to make it there). Therefore, the digital signal always remains clean and sharp. Basically, you'll never see a "snowy" DTV image -- you'll see one or you won't.
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Old 10-19-2008, 06:26 PM
f_m
 
2,289 posts, read 7,588,571 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
I have been told that in fringe reception areas, HDTV will be "all or nothing"--that is, you will get a perfect picture if your signal is above a strength threshold, and nothing at all if that channel is below that threshold. Which mean, for some, an investment not only in a conversion box, but an expensive new antenna system, as well. Can anybody shed any light on this?
Yes, because the information is compressed (i.e. encoded) so it has to be uncompressed. If you lose part of the information it's not possible to uncompress.

How far away are you? Use the following link to find out:

AntennaWeb
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