U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Tennessee > Cookeville
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 04-17-2020, 06:01 PM
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
1,058 posts, read 303,721 times
Reputation: 715

Advertisements

It's mystified me for a long time now, and others as well. However, I thought of a possible reason as I made my thread about Caney Fork River tributaries.

Maybe it would be a suitable place for small businesses normally, but the expenses due to flood insurance are too much? It is along a very flood-prone large creek, and that creek had a splendid little flood within the past century in addition to minor ones sometime most years. Now that I think of it, flood insurance rates are probably astronomical compared to parts of the county not also along Big Indian Creek; even Martin Creek isn't quite as flood-prone, and no one lives in Mine Lick Creek's nor Cane Creek's canyons.

Why hasn't it been revitalized yet? Will it ever be, and how? Do you think it should be (as long as the businesses don't also spread to remote places like Gentry or Cole's Store)?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-17-2020, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Brentwood, Tennessee
50,000 posts, read 48,225,122 times
Reputation: 98359
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sun Belt-lover L.A.M. View Post
It's mystified me for a long time now, and others as well. However, I thought of a possible reason as I made my thread about Caney Fork River tributaries.

Maybe it would be a suitable place for small businesses normally, but the expenses due to flood insurance are too much? It is along a very flood-prone large creek, and that creek had a splendid little flood within the past century in addition to minor ones sometime most years. Now that I think of it, flood insurance rates are probably astronomical compared to parts of the county not also along Big Indian Creek; even Martin Creek isn't quite as flood-prone, and no one lives in Mine Lick Creek's nor Cane Creek's canyons.

Why hasn't it been revitalized yet? Will it ever be, and how? Do you think it should be (as long as the businesses don't also spread to remote places like Gentry or Cole's Store)?
Where is the downtown you're thinking should be revitalized? South of 40 or north?

I've been through there, and I don't remember any historic blocks of commercial buildings. I remember churches, a library, and houses.

And yes, Cole's Store is REMOTE.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2020, 11:32 PM
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
1,058 posts, read 303,721 times
Reputation: 715
Quote:
Originally Posted by BirdieBelle View Post
Where is the downtown you're thinking should be revitalized? South of 40 or north?

I've been through there, and I don't remember any historic blocks of commercial buildings. I remember churches, a library, and houses.

And yes, Cole's Store is REMOTE.
The downtown is probably on both sides. I assure you, it was a thriving tiny town long before my parents were born, even if most of the buildings are gone; here's an article about it being a ghost town of sorts. You forgot that they have a post office, and there's a community center where the school was.

Also, here's an abandoned commercial building located directly on the floodplain. They'd have to tear it down and replace it, though; it's in horrid shape. Something desperately needs to be done about that.

Take a look at Auburntown in Cannon County, for example. After the bypass there was built, they lost all of their businesses. It baffles me how they can remain incorporated despite that. Maybe what few old businesses they had aren't gone because either they aren't in a flood-prone area or the Saunders Fork hasn't had time.

Temperance Hall, for example, also had several businesses in the past, but the Caney Fork's Smith Fork washed the old buildings away in a catastrophic flood.

I wonder, maybe the interstate being built had a similar effect on them to what the bypass around Auburntown did? I did the fastest route from Boma to Gordonsville just now with the "avoid highways" option on, and it gave me 31 minutes and 20.8 miles going directly through town rather than 22 minutes and 20.3 miles. Many people at Silver Point get off to go to Smithville or even just Hurricane Marina, while Granville isn't on/near the interstate at all, so their otherwise similar downtowns wouldn't have been affected that badly. The rail becoming used less often couldn't have helped either.

Last edited by Sun Belt-lover L.A.M.; 04-17-2020 at 11:47 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-18-2020, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Brentwood, Tennessee
50,000 posts, read 48,225,122 times
Reputation: 98359
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sun Belt-lover L.A.M. View Post

Also, here's an abandoned commercial building located directly on the floodplain. They'd have to tear it down and replace it, though; it's in horrid shape. Something desperately needs to be done about that.
It would require a lot of money, and construction options are limited in a floodplain. Sometimes remodeling in a flood plain can trigger new regulations. Flood insurance is very expensive. And the demographics of the area would have to be able to support whatever ends up there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sun Belt-lover L.A.M. View Post

After the bypass there was built, they lost all of their businesses[/url].
It's in the term itself: by-pass. By definition the majority of traffic passes by, and yes, that usually means struggle in the aftermath.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sun Belt-lover L.A.M. View Post

... while Granville isn't on/near the interstate at all, so their otherwise similar downtowns wouldn't have been affected that badly.
Granville has the Cumberland River all around it, but they also worked hard to preserve what was there through all these years. It's such a nicely done community that it enticed me to drive an hour and a half there a couple years ago just to spend a day.

But that's really the point of revitalization. A community has to have some kind of attraction to "attract" folks. Whether it's a connection to a famous person, such as Alex Haley in Henning, TN, to access to a natural site (like a lake, waterfall etc) or some unique industry or event in the area (National Storytelling Festival in Jonesborough).

Erwin TN has taken one horrifying event from its past, the strange and morbid execution of a circus elephant in 1916, and is trying to capitalize on the public interest that still exists today:

https://www.npr.org/2019/05/15/72223...g-to-save-them

Even Baxter was smart enough to get that big truck stop built to draw I-40 drivers who don't want to stop in Cookeville.

From what I've seen in BV, they are competing with surrounding exit towns for Edgar Evins traffic, there's no real job-generating industry, and they haven't made a concerted effort to preserve what was there. Even an old general store will pull in bikers and cyclists.

So what is special about BV that could be built upon?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-18-2020, 10:05 AM
 
12,400 posts, read 34,552,277 times
Reputation: 9469
Quote:
Originally Posted by BirdieBelle View Post
So what is special about BV that could be built upon?
Like many forgotten communities, Buffalo Valley actually does have a couple of things it could build upon.

Jesse James and his posse used to hang out in Buffalo Valley. And there really were herds of buffalo around there.

The interstate pretty much destroyed what was left of the old "downtown" Buffalo Valley. In its heyday, not only was BV a busy port, it also had six passenger trains a day and was the hub of that area. There were four general stores, three grist mills, two blacksmiths, a lumber yard, livestock dealers, and a bank. Buffalo Valley is older than Cookeville with its first European settlers in 1802. Here's about all that's left of the old downtown area (you really have to zoom in to see it:

https://www.google.com/maps/@36.1367...7i13312!8i6656

When the community outgrew its original school, a second school was built just north of town in 1925 and is now used as a library and community center. It's in a beautiful spot:

https://www.google.com/maps/@36.1421...7i13312!8i6656

The original school is among the structures torn down to make way for Interstate 40.

There was also a Methodist seminary and school in Buffalo Valley, built in 1874, that fed into the old Baxter Seminary (now Upperman High School). It closed in 1962 but as recently as 1976 it was still standing. It is now completely swallowed up by the woods:

https://www.google.com/maps/@36.1404...7i13312!8i6656

As for the old Buffalo Bill's, which I think was originally built in the 1970s to be a convenience store, cafe and hotel, I can't imagine anyone wanting to tackle that renovation project.

https://www.google.com/maps/@36.1398...7i13312!8i6656

Honestly, if Buffalo Valley were to ever regain some of its former glory, it might be because of the natural beauty and the outdoor activities in the area: kayaking, canoeing, boating, camping, hiking, biking. Maybe some outdoor adventure outfitters could set up shop in some of the old dilapidated buildings. But will Buffalo Valley ever be like Granville? I don't think so.
__________________


IMPORTANT READING:
Terms of Service

---
its - possession
it's - contraction of it is
your - possession
you're - contraction of you are
their - possession
they're - contraction of they are
there - referring to a place
loose - opposite of tight
lose - opposite of win
who's - contraction of who is
whose - possession
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-18-2020, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Brentwood, Tennessee
50,000 posts, read 48,225,122 times
Reputation: 98359
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMT View Post
Jesse James and his posse used to hang out in Buffalo Valley. And there really were herds of buffalo around there.
That's awesome! And noteworthy, if only via interpretive signage. The Natchez Trace is full of spots that are nothing but signs describing what used to be there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JMT View Post

Honestly, if Buffalo Valley were to ever regain some of its former glory, it might be because of the natural beauty and the outdoor activities in the area: kayaking, canoeing, boating, camping, hiking, biking. Maybe some outdoor adventure outfitters could set up shop in some of the old dilapidated buildings.
I think this is the most likely option today.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-18-2020, 10:59 PM
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
1,058 posts, read 303,721 times
Reputation: 715
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMT View Post
Honestly, if Buffalo Valley were to ever regain some of its former glory, it might be because of the natural beauty and the outdoor activities in the area: kayaking, canoeing, boating, camping, hiking, biking. Maybe some outdoor adventure outfitters could set up shop in some of the old dilapidated buildings. But will Buffalo Valley ever be like Granville? I don't think so.
True. Silver Point is a huge competitor in terms of lake traffic, but Buffalo Valley has a natural advantage in terms of kayaking. It's the best place to get off for the Canoe the Caney program. The big creek there could make a good place for camping. The creek also isn't bad for canoeing/kayaking; even the interstate has a full bridge over it, so no giant box culverts would pose a problem.

However, I do agree that it won't be like Granville. If it ever somehow gets as busy as Granville, it'll have to be in a very different way. Silver Point has out-competed Buffalo Valley for lake traffic, and Granville is a small lake resort altogether.

Unfortunately, I doubt biking will ever come to the area, unless they plan and actually do a Cookeville-to-Buffalo Valley rail trail similar to the failed Cookeville-to-Monterey one. For other nearby safe biking, either TDOT would need to either add decent-sized paved shoulders on S.R. 96, or else the county would have to on the old main road(s) to Silver Point and/or Gentry. I can't see either of those investments being made; most of the road to Gentry isn't even asphalt with lines as it is, and that's despite significant through traffic and the chipseal getting rough quickly.

If they did hiking, it would have to be north of I-40 and probably just a riverside trail along the creek. I can't see anyone on the ridge selling their land for yet another state park, and Silver Point once again out-competed them south of I-40. A riverside trail might work though, as it wouldn't take that much land and could even attract fishermen (that big creek does have some fish from the main river).

The only other possibility would be expanding upon the Middle Tennessee Dragway, but that's weekends and only for about eight months. I once again couldn't see people selling land to make way for that, as convenient businesses in that area would make the noise pollution that frustrates people worse. Plus, people on Rock Springs apparently already petitioned to get the speed limit lowered to 25, presumably to divert through traffic onto Stanton Road and/or S.R. 96; businesses would just bring a lot of that back, and I see many people blatantly violating the speed limit anyways when I go through there.

It could be a real challenge. It seems the creek and Canoe the Caney may well be their best options, unless a rail trail and/or bike lanes is/are planned by some miracle. Plus, as already discussed, flood insurance along the creek could be expensive, as would renovating that one building.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Tennessee > Cookeville
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top