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Old 10-28-2014, 03:10 PM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,627,330 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jkgourmet View Post
So P&O demands that the men wear a tuxedo or a jacket that is a dark color and matches the pants?
It seems that they require formal attire. A sports jacket and slacks does not meet that requirement--particularly on a Euro line which tend to be more formal to begin with. Anyone who isn't comfortable conforming to the required attire is free to cruise on a different line. Seems pretty cut and dry to me.
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Old 10-28-2014, 03:38 PM
 
Location: Fayetteville, NC
437 posts, read 617,856 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annerk View Post
If the top button is too tight, why don't you simply buy a larger neck size?
I'm picky about things around my neck. Even with a larger neck size I would only be comfortable with something that let me stick one or two fingers in between, and that would look pretty silly. Maybe I'm just kooky like that, but I know what I don't like.

I understand offering cruise passengers the option of dressing up formally if they want to for events; eating informally at the buffet would be fine by me on those evenings, or possibly all evenings for that matter.
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Old 10-28-2014, 03:48 PM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,627,330 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MPRetired View Post
I'm picky about things around my neck. Even with a larger neck size I would only be comfortable with something that let me stick one or two fingers in between, and that would look pretty silly. Maybe I'm just kooky like that, but I know what I don't like.

I understand offering cruise passengers the option of dressing up formally if they want to for events; eating informally at the buffet would be fine by me on those evenings, or possibly all evenings for that matter.
As long as you are willing to dine at the buffet, go for it. Just be aware that not all ships have buffets, and some have mandatory evening (not just dinner) dress codes unless you are ordering room service and staying in your cabin all night.
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Old 10-28-2014, 03:49 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,891 posts, read 25,343,932 times
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There are always other options available. I enjoy the formal nights but quite a few times we have opted not to bring those clothes because they take up too much space. The formal nights are one of the few remnants of a time when cruisers had steamer trunks full of clothes and formal wear was more common. Cruising was a very civilized, gracious way to travel.

Today it's more common to be limited to one carry on bag and that doesn't leave much room for formal wear. For me, no problem. But a tux and shoes take up a lot of space. You can usually rent a tux on the ship. Or just eat somewhere else on formal night. Once we had to attend a formal function and solved the whole problem by by mailing our formal wear back to our home after the dinner. We filled one box with the clothes and souvenirs we had purchased and it was at the post office when we returned. And we reclaimed all that luggage space.
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Old 10-29-2014, 05:24 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
72,040 posts, read 83,705,236 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
There are always other options available. I enjoy the formal nights but quite a few times we have opted not to bring those clothes because they take up too much space. The formal nights are one of the few remnants of a time when cruisers had steamer trunks full of clothes and formal wear was more common. Cruising was a very civilized, gracious way to travel.

Today it's more common to be limited to one carry on bag and that doesn't leave much room for formal wear. For me, no problem. But a tux and shoes take up a lot of space. You can usually rent a tux on the ship. Or just eat somewhere else on formal night. Once we had to attend a formal function and solved the whole problem by by mailing our formal wear back to our home after the dinner. We filled one box with the clothes and souvenirs we had purchased and it was at the post office when we returned. And we reclaimed all that luggage space.
For those who want to do this and I know some do, that is a great idea. The problem is the cost or shipping your attire back home. I am still a believer, if you do not want to do the formal thing choose a line that does not require it: most do not.

You mention the formal night is one thing that is symbolic with cruising many years ago. This is true, but times also change. For many years, until the industry started marketing cruising as a vacation for everyone, cruising was something only open to the upper class. Now we live in a world where people from all walks of life can cruise. To me, within reason this is a good thing, not a bad thing.

We can all remember when: I remember wearing a hat and gloves to church every Sunday and a girdle from the time I was a teen ager. I remember seeing my grandma in her corset, but I don't want to go back to those days.
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Old 10-31-2014, 02:43 PM
 
810 posts, read 596,110 times
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I have been on several cruises, mostly Carnival and Royal Caribbean.
It is a little weird that cruise companies should dictate what paying customers can and cannot wear. It is definitely a relic from the old snooty days.
However - the requirement is not very onerous. Even on a formal night, you can wear a nice shirt and a decent pair of trousers, it's not like they will turf you out.
If you want to stick to your guns, by all means, the buffet up on Lido deck is just as nice, usually much quicker (so you get to your favorite shows early) and less crowded.
But if you want to make a sport of it, think of it like Halloween - a chance to dress up and look nice, especially for ladies. Get some formal pictures. Stick your nose up like a snob.
tl;dr - it is really not that big a deal. If you want to complain about undue restrictions on paying passengers, may I point out to you our lovely airline industry and the especially delightful TSA.
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Old 11-01-2014, 07:59 AM
 
Location: SW France
14,267 posts, read 14,151,269 times
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We have just returned from a short cruise out of Southampton.

The difference between heading off from there compared to heading off to Heathrow or Gatwick and then flying somewhere is like chalk and cheese.

It's 45 minutes to the terminal where they take all your luggage, you check in easily and next thing you know you're in the buffet for a short while until your cabin is ready.

I don't need to go through the alternative!

But the thing is that if we sail from our local port then taking extra clothes is no problem.
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Old 11-04-2014, 04:25 PM
 
Location: annandale, va & slidell, la
7,381 posts, read 3,051,669 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
Is anyone else annoyed about the requirements of the main dining room in almost all cruise ships? There's the formal night, then the other nights where you have to dress business casual (why should I dress business casual when I'm on vacation vs working) and their definition of casual may be different.

I've been doing research on what to pack for my Bermuda cruise in August with Royal Caribbean and practically you are required to go to the main dining room since while there are other restaurants, cafes and buffets on the ship, they all charge extra while the ticket includes the meals in the main dining room. I've taken a Carnival cruise before and the dinner wasn't very filling at all and I'm typically a big eater.

So why do most cruise lines have these dress codes when people are on vacation? At least shouldn't a formal night be optional, just another optional activity that's offered for those who want it? And I don't think they allow shorts even for a casual dinner, or they may, but the standards are still stricter than most places on land. I've heard things about how they want to convey the golden age of sailing or whatever but isn't this a Caribbean getaway and a tropical escape? I hear some lines are starting to phase this out but I never quite understood why there hasn't been more feedback from passengers in general. I'm the kind of person who hates dressing up and only does it for work and church and very important functions. My usual attire doing errands in the summertime is flip flops, shorts and t-shirt. As long as I am clean and act in a gracious and respectful manner I don't think clothes is that important.

It's also a burden to have to pack more clothes. They do offer tuxedo rentals on the ship but that is extra charge of course. I really think formal nights should be optional, and that most dining places shouldn't have a dress code, or that the buffets and cafes away from the main dining room be included in the ticket price.
So you're the one. Since you've never been on a cruise, you have much to learn.
If you don't want to conform, eat in the Windjammer! I bet you think it's OK to show up at a golf course in jeans or cargo shorts. Being a slob is one's right; just don't crash a group's party dressed inappropriately. Formal night is for those that wish to dress up. If you don't want to dress up, don't enter.
The burden as you mention is on the thousands of passengers that cruise and enjoy dressing up for dinner, only see a group of ne'er-do-wells sluff by their table dressed like they just finished doing yardwork.
Now do you see the other side?
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Old 11-05-2014, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
72,040 posts, read 83,705,236 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by finalmove View Post
So you're the one. Since you've never been on a cruise, you have much to learn.
If you don't want to conform, eat in the Windjammer! I bet you think it's OK to show up at a golf course in jeans or cargo shorts. Being a slob is one's right; just don't crash a group's party dressed inappropriately. Formal night is for those that wish to dress up. If you don't want to dress up, don't enter.
The burden as you mention is on the thousands of passengers that cruise and enjoy dressing up for dinner, only see a group of ne'er-do-wells sluff by their table dressed like they just finished doing yardwork.
Now do you see the other side?
I think common sense and a happy medium is what is needed. On almost all lines, the truly formal nights have been scaled down. People no longer have to feel out of place if they choose to dress a little more casually, but people should also think of others. Too many live in a "me" world. Everyone knows or should know the difference between; formal wear; dressy casual; and complete casual and use the guidelines. I don't want to see someone show up for dinner looking like a slob regardless whether it is formal night or regular dining. On the other hand it doesn't bother me nor is it offensive if someone conceders a nice sport shirt and nice slacks dressy enough for the dinning room any night of the cruise.
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Old 11-05-2014, 06:43 PM
 
Location: Florida
490 posts, read 896,860 times
Reputation: 655
Quote:
Originally Posted by finalmove View Post
So you're the one. Since you've never been on a cruise, you have much to learn.
If you don't want to conform, eat in the Windjammer! I bet you think it's OK to show up at a golf course in jeans or cargo shorts. Being a slob is one's right; just don't crash a group's party dressed inappropriately. Formal night is for those that wish to dress up. If you don't want to dress up, don't enter.
The burden as you mention is on the thousands of passengers that cruise and enjoy dressing up for dinner, only see a group of ne'er-do-wells sluff by their table dressed like they just finished doing yardwork.
Now do you see the other side?
AMEN!!!
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