U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Travel > Cruises
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 06-22-2012, 06:36 PM
 
Location: Earth Wanderer, longing for the stars.
12,408 posts, read 16,477,375 times
Reputation: 8777

Advertisements

Secrets from a Private Yacht Captain: Q&A with Alain Desmot : Daily Traveler : Condé Nast Traveler

Above are a few words from a private yacht Captain, Alain Desmot - on the Costa Concordia, seasickness, pirates.

Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-23-2012, 12:52 PM
 
Location: N26.03 W80.11
326 posts, read 828,257 times
Reputation: 326
Interesting thing about the rabbit. I didn't know that and I work on yachts. Nowhere as exotic as where this captain is. I'm now land based, but my crewing experience was mainly in the Caribbean, Florida, Bahamas, Alaska, and Pacific Mexico.

Nautical superstition is huge. One I remember from the Caribbean is not to let a red head be the first person to board. Don't board with your left foot first is another. No bananas. Don't whistle on deck. Green hulls make angry seas. There are soooo many.

A biggie one of the boats I worked on disregarded was never leave port on a Friday. Well, we did and it was a Friday the 13th. On this trip we lost our engine but thankfully it was a sailboat. We also had a generator fire as well as getting way too close for comfort with a cargo ship.

Some days I miss my crewing jobs, but mostly I'm happy living on land and just working on the boats at the dock or for just short day trips and coming home to my comfy bed. Crew's quarters on yachts are notoriously tiny and uncomfortable.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2012, 06:56 PM
 
Location: Earth Wanderer, longing for the stars.
12,408 posts, read 16,477,375 times
Reputation: 8777
What an interesting life you must have lived.

I seem to remember that there was a time when someone told be not to whistle on board.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2012, 07:15 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...a traveling man.
39,536 posts, read 47,722,769 times
Reputation: 110352
Geeze all I've ever heard was "watch your step"....
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-29-2012, 07:40 AM
 
Location: N26.03 W80.11
326 posts, read 828,257 times
Reputation: 326
Quote:
Originally Posted by goldengrain View Post
What an interesting life you must have lived.

I seem to remember that there was a time when someone told be not to whistle on board.
Whistling is supposed to call up storms according to superstition. Maybe someone should take a boat and go to Colorado and start whistling up some rain there.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-29-2012, 04:31 PM
 
Location: Earth Wanderer, longing for the stars.
12,408 posts, read 16,477,375 times
Reputation: 8777
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2ForTheSea View Post
Whistling is supposed to call up storms according to superstition. Maybe someone should take a boat and go to Colorado and start whistling up some rain there.
Good idea.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-17-2012, 10:40 AM
 
Location: N26.03 W80.11
326 posts, read 828,257 times
Reputation: 326
This article about superstitions on board a boat/ship was published on thetriton.com:

A woman on board is bad luck

It is probably best to start with the most popular superstition. Almost any professional mariner will tell you that having a woman on board the ship makes the seas angry and is an omen of bad luck for everyone aboard. It was traditionally believed that women were not as physically or emotionally capable as men. Therefore, they had no place at sea. It was also observed that when women were aboard, men were prone to distraction or other vices that may take away from their duties. This, among other things, would anger the seas and doom the ship. Interestingly enough, there is a way to counter this effect. While having a woman on board would anger the sea, having a “naked” woman on board would calm the sea. Imagine that. This is why many vessels have a figure of a woman on the bow of the ship, this figure almost always being bare-breasted. It was believed that a woman’s bare breasts would “shame” the stormy seas into calm. Alas, the ancient power of female nudity.

The evils of the banana

Bananas are a mainstay of most cultures and are the world’s most popular fruit. However, these deliciously yellow treats have no place at sea. Since the 1700s, it has been widely believed that having a banana on board was an omen of disaster. In the early 1700s, during the height of the Spanish Empire’s South Atlantic and Caribbean trading domain, it was observed that nearly every ship that disappeared at sea and did not make its destination was carrying a cargo of bananas. This gave rise to the belief that hauling bananas was a dangerous prospect. There are other documented origins to this superstition as well. Another explanation for the banana superstition is that the fastest sailing ships used to carry bananas from the tropics to U.S. ports along the East Coast in order to land them before they could spoil. Another theory is that bananas carried aboard slave ships fermented and gave off methane gas, which would be trapped below deck. Anyone in the hold, including the human cargo, would succumb to the poisoned air, and anyone trying to climb down into the hold to help them would fall prey to the dangerous gas. And finally, one of the better known dangers of bananas at sea, is that a species of spider with a lethal bite likes to hide in bunches of bananas. Crewmen suddenly dying of spider bites after bananas are brought aboard certainly would be considered a bad omen resulting in the cargo being tossed into the sea.

Unlucky Friday

It is believed that Friday is the worst possible day to start a journey on a boat and no enterprise can succeed which commences on that day. The most well known reason for the dislike of Friday is because it is believed that Jesus was crucified on a Friday. Therefore, this day must be observed and respected and will be unlucky for anyone who attempts to go about business as usual. Many sailors state that various ships lost at sea disembarked on a Friday. In contrast, Sunday is the best possible day to begin a voyage. It has led to the adage, “Sunday sail, never fail.”



Here are some more general superstitions to bring you good luck:

A silver coin placed under the masthead ensures a successful voyage.

Pouring wine on the deck will bring good luck on a long voyage. A sacrifice to the gods.

Swallows seen at sea are a good sign, as are dolphins swimming with the ship. Can anyone think of a particular movie character named Sparrow?

Tattoos and piercing are said to ward off evil spirits. Gold hoop earrings are especially lucky.

It's good luck to spit in the ocean before you sail.

Coins thrown into the sea as a boat leaves port is a small toll to Neptune, the sea god, for a safe voyage.

A child to be born on a ship was good luck (probably not for the child). The term, “Son of a Gun” is derived from this lucky act. When the crew was restricted to the ship for any extended period of time, wives and ladies of easy virtue were often allowed to live aboard with the crew. Infrequently, but not uncommonly, children were born aboard. A convenient place for this was between the guns on the gun deck. If the child's father was unknown, they were entered into the ship's log as "son of a gun.”

Black cats are considered good luck and will bring a sailor home from the sea. While black is the color of death, and black bags or clothing are harbingers of doom, black cats are considered lucky on the sea. Mostly this is believed to be the result of the opposite effect of land based superstition, where a black cat is unlucky.

Here are some more maritime superstitions that may bring you bad luck. For some reason, there are always far more bad luck superstitions.

Never start a voyage on the first Monday in April. This is the day that Cain slew Able.

Black traveling bags are bad luck for a seaman. Black is the color of death and indicative of the depths of the sea.

Avoid people with red hair when going to the ship to begin a journey. Redheads bring bad luck to a ship, which can be averted if you speak to the red-head before they speak to you.

Never say good luck or allow someone to say good luck to you unanswered. If someone says “good luck” to you, it is most assuredly a bad omen and sure to bring about bad luck. The only way this can be countered is by drawing blood.

Disaster will follow if you step onto a boat with your left foot first. Ever hear the old saying, “Step off on the right foot first”?

Throwing stones into the sea will cause great waves and storms. A sign of disrespect to the sea, ensuring retaliation in the form of stormy seas.

Flowers are unlucky onboard a ship. They could later be used to make a funeral wreath for the dead, therefore, becoming a symbol that someone could die on the voyage.

Don’t look back once your ship has left port as this can bring bad luck. Looking back to port implies that you are not truly ready to brave the seas and complete your voyage, bringing about bad luck on yourself and the ship.

To name the boat with a word ending in "a" is bad luck.

If the rim of a glass rings stop it quickly or there will be a shipwreck.

On whistling - One widespread and universal superstition forbids whistling in the wheelhouse or anywhere onboard for that matter. Whistling onboard will raise a gale, hence "whistling up a storm”.

Killing a swallow, albatross, gull or dolphin will bring bad luck. Seabirds are thought to carry the souls of dead sailors

On pigs - Sailors in the West Indies had a bizarre superstition related to swine. Pigs themselves were held at great respect because they possessed cloven hooves just like the devil. The pig was the signature animal for the Great Earth Goddess who controlled the winds. As a result, these sailors never spoke the word "pig" out loud, instead referring to the animal by such safe nicknames as curly-tail and turf-rooter. It was believed that mentioning the word "pig" would result in strong winds. Actually killing a pig on board the ship would result in a full scale storm.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Travel > Cruises
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top