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Old 12-10-2013, 06:21 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
453 posts, read 520,060 times
Reputation: 666

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerseygal4u View Post
Where did this idea that one should work 40 hrs a week and expect their basic needs to be met come from?
I see no evidence of this from past generations before the 50's.
It was normal to work 15 hrs doing farmwork before that time.
Ummm... how can I say this diplomatically? Before the 1850s a large percentage of work in the USA was farm-related, yes. (In certain other portions of the Western world you have to go back even further, as much as a century in some places, to reach that point.) And these were self-sustaining family farms, not industrialized farming where you worked for someone else. But the 1950s? No. By the early 20th century, most people had jobs unrelated to farming. The Industrial Revolution began in the 18th century and by the late 19th factories were everywhere. So were stores, banks, finance companies, and by 1910 there were most of the same types of industry we have right now in 2013, minus a few fairly recent arrivals revolving around the information technology sector, etc.

A bit of perspective: I was born in 1964; my parents in 1929 and 1930. My grandparents were born between 1899 and 1905. My great-grandparents were born in between 1870 and 1882. If I'm remembering my family history and tree properly, I think I have to go back to my great-great grandparents to find even one person who grew up on a farm.

The push to get to a 40-hour work week actually began in earnest in the early 1800s during Britain's Industrial Revolution, and spread from there. In the United States the 40-hour work week for jobs outside the family farm became the norm at different times in different industries. The Adamson Act in 1916 established 8-hour workdays for railroad workers, and it spread from there until the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1937 codified 8-hour workdays and 40-hour workweeks across nearly all of American industry.

Quote:
Working 60 hrs a week isn't so bad.
It isn't if you love your job so much that you'd do it for fun if you didn't need money, and if you don't have other things you'd rather do.

Quote:
Maybe I'm the type of person who hates being idle.
I don't enjoy being idle, either, but fortunately I can think of plenty of things to do when I'm not working. I like to call this "having a life".

Last edited by Kineticity; 12-10-2013 at 06:53 PM..
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Old 12-10-2013, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,698 posts, read 23,681,631 times
Reputation: 35449
Remember too that you have to count benefits in with your wages as a part of them. A teacher for example earning $15.00 stretched over 60 hours but with added benefits is doing much better than a burger flipper who is earning only $15.00 and hour with no benies.

The teacher may be salaried and works 60 hours for his or her pay but the burger flipper who gets paid hourly may work the same amount of hours as well including weekends and holidays. The teacher $15.00 an hour with a retirement package, paid vacation, 401k, paid holidays, pension plan and other fringes. That's all part of the salary package. The burger flipper who gets....well....$15.00 an hour.

The ACA will hopefully equalize the medical benefits part of that for the burger flipper in that equation but we have yet to see that happen so I am talking about past working history in America.

Many people I know work 60 hour weeks, it is pretty common in many professions. I had to do it for the majority of my working career in every job I had at one time or another. For some reason, those I know who are in the teaching profession seem to think this is an exclusive situation to their profession.

Last edited by Minervah; 12-10-2013 at 06:26 PM.. Reason: added thought
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Old 12-10-2013, 06:47 PM
 
1,006 posts, read 1,870,275 times
Reputation: 1556
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Dissenter View Post
Many people also do that job because that is the ONLY job they can actually get offered to them. They probably exhausted all other alternatives, especially in depressed areas of the country like Cleveland and Detroit. While I was unemployed in KY, I didn't even bother applying for minimum wage jobs because with what I would be spending for gas to get to some of them, I would maybe be gaining $100 every 2 weeeks. I think it is pathetic that with the fast-rising COL and inflation the minimum wage is still under $10 while the CEOs on top are sitting on millions.
Are these the same CEO's who started off in minimum wage jobs, worked hard, went to college, worked harder, and rose up in the corporation while improving themselves through coursework and experience? If so, it seems to me we have earned it.
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Old 12-10-2013, 07:13 PM
 
6,461 posts, read 6,486,736 times
Reputation: 9799
Default Pj

Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
Remember too that you have to count benefits in with your wages as a part of them. A teacher for example earning $15.00 stretched over 60 hours but with added benefits is doing much better than a burger flipper who is earning only $15.00 and hour with no benies.

The teacher may be salaried and works 60 hours for his or her pay but the burger flipper who gets paid hourly may work the same amount of hours as well including weekends and holidays. The teacher $15.00 an hour with a retirement package, paid vacation, 401k, paid holidays, pension plan and other fringes. That's all part of the salary package. The burger flipper who gets....well....$15.00 an hour.

The ACA will hopefully equalize the medical benefits part of that for the burger flipper in that equation but we have yet to see that happen so I am talking about past working history in America.

Many people I know work 60 hour weeks, it is pretty common in many professions. I had to do it for the majority of my working career in every job I had at one time or another. For some reason, those I know who are in the teaching profession seem to think this is an exclusive situation to their profession.
I don't get a 401 k...it's a 403 b that I provide 100% of the funding for. ( no matching) I can never get social security or my husbands social security even though I paid years into mine. I will get a pension, but I paid into it too. It' s not free by any means. It's age and years of service equal 85. That is likely to go up to 90 in the next ten years. I also spend between 1-2 grand a year on classroom supplies. I made 26,500$ my first year teaching, and only made the increased salary after 15 years.

Basically a fast food worker doesn't need 15$ as a starting salary. 10$ as a minimum wage is decent, and most workers eventually get raises. There are many professions that earn less than teachers and require a degree. ( social work, journalism, etc...) I don't think a minimum wage job should make the equivalent of a person with a degree who is a professional.
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Old 12-10-2013, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
453 posts, read 520,060 times
Reputation: 666
I honestly don't think a degreed professional should only be making $15 per hour in many markets, either.
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Old 12-10-2013, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Northeast Ohio
319 posts, read 383,269 times
Reputation: 920
Quote:
Originally Posted by baileyvpotter View Post
There was a report on the news regarding the $15.00 per hour. That is a beginning figure as part of the bargaining process which doesn't necessarily mean they will get that. Even if they do receive that amount (which I think is unlikely) the cost of a big burger at McDonald's would only increase 50 cents.
I agree. Most likely, the protesters are expecting to maybe get 10 or 11 dollars an hour, which is probably more in line with what minimum wage would be if it had kept up with inflation the last few years. Some sources say it should be a lot more than that. But no matter what anyone thinks minimum wage SHOULD be, it seems perfectly reasonable to me that it provide the same purchasing power year after year.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kineticity View Post
I sometimes think the problem with people in this country lately is that too many of them are so insecure they can't feel good about their lives unless they know someone else is miserable.
I think you are absolutely right!

Quote:
Originally Posted by stockwiz View Post
Yep... more power to them. The people who are 'higher up' in the world or so they would like to think, who bash on burger flippers and grocery workers can keep feeling good about themselves... retail is no fun and if those employees want to band together to try to get higher wages I support them... the old fashioned 'union'
Me too. Huge banks and corporations certainly have people (lobbyists, lawyers) looking out for THEIR best interests at every available opportunity, so I don't understand why fast-food workers (or any other worker, for that matter) shouldn't do the same thing. Workers in other lines of work that pay higher than minimum wage are falling behind the curve as well. It might not be a bad idea to follow these protesters' lead.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tinytrump View Post
hello- nobody can get 40 hr s a week at any given service JOB---29 hrs BUD!
Yep. And a second job is out of the question when McJob #1 expects you to be on call and available 24/7 and work a constantly changing schedule. That "flexible" scheduling so many companies try to tell you they have? Yeah, it's flexible all right - flexible for THEM.

Last edited by Sedivec; 12-10-2013 at 08:46 PM..
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Old 12-10-2013, 08:32 PM
 
4,881 posts, read 4,856,782 times
Reputation: 7334
Does anyone remember this "An honest day's wage for an honest day's work?"
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Old 12-10-2013, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
453 posts, read 520,060 times
Reputation: 666
Quote:
Originally Posted by baileyvpotter View Post
Does anyone remember this "An honest day's wage for an honest day's work?"
I certainly remember the concept. It's been fading over the past thirty years though, which coincides with my working life thus far.
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Old 12-10-2013, 08:41 PM
 
Location: Northeast Ohio
319 posts, read 383,269 times
Reputation: 920
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meyerland View Post
Basically a fast food worker doesn't need 15$ as a starting salary. 10$ as a minimum wage is decent, and most workers eventually get raises. There are many professions that earn less than teachers and require a degree. ( social work, journalism, etc...) I don't think a minimum wage job should make the equivalent of a person with a degree who is a professional.
10 dollars is probably more in line with what they'll get.

I don't think fast-food workers should necessarily make the same as teachers or social workers, either; the pay for teachers and social workers should be increased, as well. And so should the pay for lots of other lines of work.

But none of us are going to get those well-deserved increases unless we fight for them, which is exactly what the protesting fast-food workers are doing. In my opinion, any group of workers whose pay is losing purchasing power over time should not be afraid to do the same thing. You don't have to be part of an official union to be a unified force with a voice.
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Old 12-10-2013, 08:46 PM
 
6,461 posts, read 6,486,736 times
Reputation: 9799
I had 3 minimum wage jobs when I was putting myself through college. I worked the day shift MWF as a nanny 7-3, TTH was for my classes, M-Friday I was a cashier working 4-10 shift at Walgreens, and the weekends I worked at a fast food place at a public golf course for 16-20 hours.

I only made minimum wage for a few months and then I got raises because I worked hard.i worked for Kmart, Walgreens, Kindercare, private nanny, tutoring other college students/highschool students, acting, delivery services, cosmetician, food services at a Subway, etc....

All except for tutoring were minimum wage until I proved myself. If you work 60 hours a week at 10$ an hour you would earn over 30,000$.

Idon't buy the idea that you can only work 16-29 hours at a minimum wage job. I would be cutting grass, babysitting, getting a night job, janitorial work at an office at night, detailing cars, selling items for friends on eBay or garage sales for a fee, telemarketing, etc...
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