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Old 01-31-2014, 08:59 PM
 
11,262 posts, read 8,421,299 times
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No. Well....some of us are, but not all.
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Old 02-01-2014, 03:30 AM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,872 posts, read 13,545,637 times
Reputation: 29032
Slate magazine has an interesting historical perspective on the matter:

Atlanta’s snow fiasco: The real problem in the South isn’t weather, it’s history.
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Old 02-01-2014, 06:54 AM
 
Location: SC
8,791 posts, read 5,651,894 times
Reputation: 12805
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mack Knife View Post
Some people can't afford to take a day off but can afford to sit in their car all day waiting for a rescue.

Maybe you can explain that a little better.
Sorry, if you can't figure that one out yourself, there is no point to telling you. It would be like giving a cow a calculator and then wondering why it still can't do basic math.
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Old 02-01-2014, 07:50 AM
 
1,265 posts, read 1,566,006 times
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They deserve it. Drive a semi myself, and always check the weather on the laptop. Every winter, while driving to all 48 states, winter weather has not give me any problems. If it get as bad as in Atlanta, the receivers/shippers are not at work, like most, so one call does the trick. Maybe Georgia should get more of this, after about 15 generations they might learn.....
I was in IA and NE during that same time, it was cold, but the roads dry....
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Old 02-01-2014, 09:37 AM
 
Location: New York City
4,036 posts, read 8,936,915 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mack Knife View Post
Some people can't afford to take a day off but can afford to sit in their car all day waiting for a rescue.

Maybe you can explain that a little better.
Because employers are greedy and only think about the bottom line. If management closes the office, people still get paid—so they try and do it as little as possible.

I worked for a law firm where management wanted everyone to come into work on the 50th floor of a skyscraper in Manhattan on the day after 9-11. There was a huge revolt and they backed down.
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Old 02-01-2014, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Jersey
2,296 posts, read 3,396,020 times
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I can't blame ppl in the deep South for not knowing how drive in snow, but I can blame officials for not keeping up with the weather and planning appropriately. Georgians also need to take a hard look at the dysfunctionalism in government between the state, county, and local levels as some of the causes of this mess are due to those underlying issues.
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Old 02-01-2014, 10:16 AM
 
28,905 posts, read 46,717,705 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jukesgrrl View Post
Slate magazine has an interesting historical perspective on the matter:

Atlanta’s snow fiasco: The real problem in the South isn’t weather, it’s history.
An incredibly stupid and agenda-driven article. The problem had bupkis to do with a mass transit referendum. It had everything to do with the fact that the region rarely sees appreciable snow, which means that a massive investment in equipment is a waste of money. And when it does, the weather forecasts almost always give the populace plenty of time to plan around it.

If the forecast had been anywhere close to accurate, everybody would have just stayed home for 24 hours. Problem avoided.
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Old 02-01-2014, 10:19 AM
 
5,392 posts, read 6,530,997 times
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I lived in the Atlanta area 10 years and never liked it and would be the last to say glowing things about it but I would never say stupid.

I don't see how this is so hard to understand:

Geography and terrain:

(1)Normally the storms coming from the Arctic, Plains, etc whip around the southern Appalachian Mountains swinging through mid GA, maybe touching on the southern, eastern and northeastern edges of Atlanta then on through the Carolinas to VA or the East Coast.

The weather predictions were similar to this prevailing wind flow. Think about it. The Appalachians take the brunt of the wind and blunt a direct west to east action. So following the predictions, available state snow equipment was sent south of Atlanta in preparation for the incoming storm.

(2)Atlanta, especially Cobb County is built on ridges - fingers stretching out from the mountains. So it is an up and down thing to drive. The roads are built to accommodate this resulting in bridges over the low areas and rivers to the west and spaghetti junction in the northeast perimeter.

So driving on two inches of snow on land with relatively minor elevation changes is a different story than driving on two inches of ice and snow up and down hills, ridges, and bridges.

Weather models and predictions:

Weather predictions based upon models predicted that the storm would follow the normalish pattern which was south of Atlanta. I heard that the prediction was changed at 230-330 am due to the strength and speed of the storm being greater than expected which overcame our mighty old Appalachians and went over the mountains rather than around, bringing the storm flow to northern Atlanta and even bringing snow to the Outer Banks of North Carolina. see #1 above.

(3)No snow in the morning and no communication of the change and things continued based upon the last known predictions. People went to work and school.

Managing Chaos:

So people are at work, then the word gets out the storm is coming our way fast see number #3 above. Businesses, schools, etc released their people all at the same time. Even under the best of times congestion in Atlanta is horrible but imagine putting them all on the road at once.

Too many people and too much traffic on the road, incoming storm, elevations and icing led to chaos. And the equipment may have been on its way north but it wasn't there yet or maybe once the perimeter, roads, and bridges were clogged it might have be too late.

one of the things I like about the GA people is their friendliness and hospitality. And they opened their doors to strangers, they offered their homes and help to the needy. Chick Fil A brought food and drink to those stuck, Walgreens and Home Depot kept their stores open and offered safe respite to those stuck. Teachers/administrators stayed in schools with the children to watch after them. Churches opened up their doors as well. Plus I don't even know who or what else stepped up. I do know a kind stranger picked up my sister and took her to where she could walk to her house. Took her 8 hours to get home. Then they had to go back and get her car a day or so later.

Could they have done better? Absolutely. This wasn't the first ice storm Atlanta has faced and it isn't the first shut down. Incompetent and corrupt? yes. Atlanta is well known for both. Failure to communicate essential information? sure, why did the updated and changed forecast take so long to get to the right people? I would sure want an after action review if I were the Governor.

The forecast being wrong? I am on the fence about that. Forecasts are notorious for being wrong, anywhere. Models are built on percentages and probabilities. Yet isn't the HQ for the weather channel in Atlanta and doesn't the National Weather Service have more scientific wherewithall to do better? But then again a Polar Vortex of great magnitude? Snow on the southern beaches?

So I disagree with the title of your OP and hopefully this too long note explains the situation faced a little better than the OP apparently understood.
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Old 02-01-2014, 10:35 AM
 
14,195 posts, read 6,105,213 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sirron View Post
To be fair, is it possible that most underestimated what would happen? Here in the north, most who go out into storms and icy conditions have the attitude that they can handle it. Of course, most of us do just that. But then we've had experience with how to navigate such roads. These folks didn't.
You also have salt or sanded streets, and experience driving in those conditions. Big difference.
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Old 02-01-2014, 10:38 AM
 
14,195 posts, read 6,105,213 times
Reputation: 8847
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedgehog_Mom View Post
Some employees (not just medical professionals) are considered essential employees and are expected to go in no matter what the weather is like. Some other people can't afford to lose their job...if your boss says you're fired if you don't go in, you're probably going to go in, because it's just not that easy to find a new job these days.

I think weather conditions that come up during the day are more difficult to deal with...if it snows overnight in a place unused to snow, it's easy for schools and businesses to decide to close. But when something is forecast to start during the day, then they either risk getting everyone stuck at work and schools, or closing just in case, and then not having it snow after all.
Exactly what happened in Houston that same day. Huge paranoia and schools closed, but tthere was noice on the roads.
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