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Old 02-09-2014, 03:12 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,872 posts, read 13,571,770 times
Reputation: 29034

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If you have a few spare minutes today, or later in the week, this article that recently appeared in the New York Times Sunday Review is quite thought provoking. To me, it speaks eloquently about what's going on with Wall Street and the financial institutions in our country and shines a light on WHY things are they way they are with the American economy. But others may have a different opinion. It's called For the Love of Money and was written by Sam Polk, a former hedge fund trader.
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/19/op...oney.html?_r=1

For a closer look at the blow-back from this phenomenon Mr. Polk describes, the following well-written first-person essay is from Huffington Post's ongoing series about people who are having trouble in our current economic climate. It's called I'm a Member of the American 'Used-to-Haves' and it was submitted by a resident of Massachusetts.
I'm a Member of the American 'Used-to-Haves'*|&nbspKathleen Ann

I'd be interested in C-Der's comments on those essays. Do you think America's middle class will survive if the 1% is allowed to run Wall Street with few restrictions? Is the growth of the Used-to-Have segment of our population a problem as you see it? Do you feel threatened by "wealth addicts"?

Thanks in advance for your thoughts.
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Old 02-09-2014, 04:30 PM
 
Location: Looking over your shoulder
30,348 posts, read 27,830,017 times
Reputation: 81379
Simply put “yes” the middle class is being ruined by the upper wealthy.

It’s been happening for decades and increasing faster every year. However it’s increased more lately than before. Now with the Supreme Court Judges allowing money to speak the rich have a larger voice in the country; one man one vote is gone. When you have the wealth you control the votes via the control of the media. Provide enough paid for propaganda and you can sell anything to anyone most of the time. The wealthy have the power to influence everything to include lobbyists, laws, and control of how they can get more wealth. Those of the middle class have been and are slipping away into poverty.

Look at what happens to a wealthy drunk teen driver in Texas. Daddy pays $450K a year to keep him out of jail because of “affluenza”. Affluenza Defense: Rich Texas Teen Gets Probation For Killing 4 Pedestrians While Driving Drunk (VIDEO) So my guess is affluenza will continue to be the get out of jail card for those of wealth whenever they are caught doing something wrong and breaking the law. You can KILL four others and get away with it. It’s an example of what wealth can do in America, but staying on topic - the middle class hasn’t a chance and the poor are already gone – most of them into prisons.

The wealthy are just that “wealthy with money” but short on morals and ethics.
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Old 02-09-2014, 04:37 PM
 
Location: Viña del Mar, Chile
16,411 posts, read 26,265,752 times
Reputation: 16497
The middle class is ruined by the poor. The middle class is constantly paying taxes on all of the social reform programs for the people who can't cut it in society. The ones who make poor decisions and the ones who feel the need to spend all their money. The middle class is not rich and is scraping by, but still smart enough to make wise decisions with their money.. which is keeping them middle class. However, the middle class see no benefits from the social programs, it's all for the poor. The tax cuts are for the rich. The middle class is just stuck in the middle and constantly screwed.
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Old 02-09-2014, 04:38 PM
 
Location: Up above the world so high!
45,269 posts, read 88,615,347 times
Reputation: 39870
The "middle class" is being pulled apart in the tug of war between the greedy rich and the greedy poor - each of whom have huge entitlement mentalities.
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Old 02-10-2014, 04:18 PM
 
Location: South Hampton Roads
203 posts, read 262,873 times
Reputation: 363
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jukesgrrl View Post
If you have a few spare minutes today, or later in the week, this article that recently appeared in the New York Times Sunday Review is quite thought provoking. To me, it speaks eloquently about what's going on with Wall Street and the financial institutions in our country and shines a light on WHY things are they way they are with the American economy. But others may have a different opinion. It's called For the Love of Money and was written by Sam Polk, a former hedge fund trader.
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/19/op...oney.html?_r=1

For a closer look at the blow-back from this phenomenon Mr. Polk describes, the following well-written first-person essay is from Huffington Post's ongoing series about people who are having trouble in our current economic climate. It's called I'm a Member of the American 'Used-to-Haves' and it was submitted by a resident of Massachusetts.
I'm a Member of the American 'Used-to-Haves'*|&nbspKathleen Ann

I'd be interested in C-Der's comments on those essays. Do you think America's middle class will survive if the 1% is allowed to run Wall Street with few restrictions? Is the growth of the Used-to-Have segment of our population a problem as you see it? Do you feel threatened by "wealth addicts"?

Thanks in advance for your thoughts.
Great articles!

Best way to fix this is to get money out of politics. In order to do that, though, Americans must stop the infighting and start voting for and pushing those parties that have more of their interests at heart: Dems.

Dems are nowhere near what they should be, but we can collectively get them there if we stop the infighting and if other people stop voting against their own interests because they perceive that everyone else is getting something for free.

Sadly, our history dictates that times have to get very bad and for a long time before real changes are ever enacted. Since Bush and Co's financial crash we've not been doing well financially, but I predict that things need to get much worse before the proletariat of this nation get their acts together and figure out that we need to collectively push for change instead of worrying about who's gay, who's on welfare, and who's parent is illegal because they were looking for a better job opportunity.

Money out of politics... my two cents.
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Old 02-10-2014, 04:44 PM
 
12,137 posts, read 6,714,205 times
Reputation: 12997
I don't think "never hads" are going to have much sympathy for "used to haves". Some people have never had or ever will have the extras, at least these people got to have it for a while. The downturn affected me but I'm grateful for what I have had in the past, even if I lost ground and don't have all those things now.
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Old 02-10-2014, 10:44 PM
 
Location: Earth
2,549 posts, read 3,261,271 times
Reputation: 1202
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jukesgrrl View Post
If you have a few spare minutes today, or later in the week, this article that recently appeared in the New York Times Sunday Review is quite thought provoking. To me, it speaks eloquently about what's going on with Wall Street and the financial institutions in our country and shines a light on WHY things are they way they are with the American economy. But others may have a different opinion. It's called For the Love of Money and was written by Sam Polk, a former hedge fund trader.
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/19/op...oney.html?_r=1

For a closer look at the blow-back from this phenomenon Mr. Polk describes, the following well-written first-person essay is from Huffington Post's ongoing series about people who are having trouble in our current economic climate. It's called I'm a Member of the American 'Used-to-Haves' and it was submitted by a resident of Massachusetts.
I'm a Member of the American 'Used-to-Haves'*|&nbspKathleen Ann

I'd be interested in C-Der's comments on those essays. Do you think America's middle class will survive if the 1% is allowed to run Wall Street with few restrictions? Is the growth of the Used-to-Have segment of our population a problem as you see it? Do you feel threatened by "wealth addicts"?

Thanks in advance for your thoughts.

The poor can be greedy too. Any class can be. You also have very greedy powerful politicians in DC who line their pockets from lobby groups and raise taxes on everyone. 17 trillion dollars in debt!! and this put "us" tax payers on the hook for it. No one company could cause this much damage. None. The rich can afford to pay the taxes but not the middle and poor classes with fixed budgets. I have nothing against billionaires. Yeah, some are greedy but not all of them are. It's billionaires like Bill Gates, Steve Jobs etc. that have created successful companies that created thousands of high paying jobs for anyone who wanted to succeed. This also spawned other new businesses that created even more jobs because of them. If they were greedy then tell me how the people working for them is not experiencing financial success (more millionaires and middle class). The question is what economic value are you bringing to the market place? What are you doing to create the many jobs for other people the way these people did? Poor people don't produce as many jobs that rich or middle class people do. I don't buy the I'm poor victim mentality. Why? Because I was once homeless. You can't get any poorer than that. Today, I am successful and in the middle class to upper. How did I get there? I didn't do it by whining and complaining about rich people all day. I got off my butt and did something about it. Success is only achieved by what you do. No one can do it for you and certainly not the government. What kind of future you have is what you put into it.

Keep in mind not all rich people started rich. Chris Gardner protrayed in the movie Pursuit of Happyness started from the bottom before he became rich. Why? because he believed and didn't stereotype other successful people. Everyone regardless of class can be successful. I know because I'm living proof of it.
Some of these so called rich people like Chris Gardner have once struggled themselves. We should not generalize an entire class based on one person's greed in an article. Don't ever let anyone tell you that you can't do something. Never give up! Like Chris I've been there myself. He made that decision and I have too.



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Old 02-11-2014, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Up above the world so high!
45,269 posts, read 88,615,347 times
Reputation: 39870
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanologist View Post
The poor can be greedy too. Any class can be.
My point too - there are entitlement mentalities to be found in BOTH socioeconomic groups.
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Old 02-11-2014, 01:31 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
9,355 posts, read 16,862,436 times
Reputation: 11463
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jukesgrrl View Post
If you have a few spare minutes today, or later in the week, this article that recently appeared in the New York Times Sunday Review is quite thought provoking. To me, it speaks eloquently about what's going on with Wall Street and the financial institutions in our country and shines a light on WHY things are they way they are with the American economy. But others may have a different opinion. It's called For the Love of Money and was written by Sam Polk, a former hedge fund trader.
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/19/op...oney.html?_r=1

For a closer look at the blow-back from this phenomenon Mr. Polk describes, the following well-written first-person essay is from Huffington Post's ongoing series about people who are having trouble in our current economic climate. It's called I'm a Member of the American 'Used-to-Haves' and it was submitted by a resident of Massachusetts.
I'm a Member of the American 'Used-to-Haves'*|&nbspKathleen Ann

I'd be interested in C-Der's comments on those essays. Do you think America's middle class will survive if the 1% is allowed to run Wall Street with few restrictions? Is the growth of the Used-to-Have segment of our population a problem as you see it? Do you feel threatened by "wealth addicts"?

Thanks in advance for your thoughts.

great articles / blogs ... thanks for sharing.... reps owed once my wand is freed

and no, I don't see the middle class surviving in this current trajectory.......
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Old 02-11-2014, 02:35 PM
 
Location: PA
2,110 posts, read 1,853,436 times
Reputation: 5408
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovesMountains View Post
The "middle class" is being pulled apart in the tug of war between the greedy rich and the greedy poor - each of whom have huge entitlement mentalities.
Couldn't have said it any better myself.

I've wondered if I was being hypocritical or inconsistent when I'd post complaining about the barrage of donation requests at work and at local businesses, and about people I know in dire straits that do nothing to better themselves, while at the same time being upset with the excesses of the super-rich. But, I've thought about it, and it's not whether the person is very rich or very poor that bothers me. It's, like you said, the entitlement, and the lack of character and concern for others that gets under my skin. Rich or poor, it's the people who abuse the good will and hard work of others for their own personal again that makes being in the middle class feel, as I've bluntly put it at times, like "the meat in a sh*t sandwich".
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