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Old 04-16-2014, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
8,881 posts, read 15,676,669 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red_Devil View Post
Why is there no Roberto Clemente Day for Hispanics?
For one thing, he came to the majors 53 years too late. The first Latin major league player was Colombian Louis Castro in 1902. Dozens, if not hunderds, of Hispanics had played at the Major League level by the time Clemente debuted in 1955.
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Old 04-16-2014, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
8,881 posts, read 15,676,669 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Freddy View Post
Who were the first Black football or basketball players in the U.S.?

Do they have a special day?
The NFL has been integrated since day 1, with five black players being in the league when it was formed in 1920. And the NBA was integrated relatively early, being founded in 1946 black players taking the court in 1950.

Major League Baseball, on the other hand, made a conscious effort to exclude blacks between 1887 and Robinson's debut in 1947.

Last edited by duster1979; 04-16-2014 at 12:23 PM.. Reason: Typo on a year
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Old 04-16-2014, 11:51 AM
 
16,189 posts, read 20,212,448 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EHCT View Post
Branch Rickey didn't have to dodge 95 mph fastballs thrown at his head and/or get stitched up every time somebody slid into 2nd base with their metal spikes up...and/or whatever else somebody wanted to do to him just because they knew that they could get away with it
That is true.

But Branch Rickey was flying solo in regards to breaking the color line in baseball as far as talking the other owners into thinking that this should be in the game's future. And the individual who had the ultimate say in regards to changing the game to this level was MLB commissioner Kennesaw Landis.

Four years before the signing of Jackie Robinson this subject had come up before. An individual by the name of Bill Veeck made the cardinal error of announcing to the press after the 1942 season that he wanted to purchase the Philadelphia Phillies and stock it with black players. And this was for two reasons.

1. At this time in Philadelphia Phillies baseball history this franchise was a poor club and had been for some time. It would be another seven years before they would be a factor in the National League, finally winning the pennant in 1950 with a bunch of young overachievers that the baseball writers nicknamed "The Whiz Kids."

2. It is a well known fact that a number of baseball superstars out of both leagues (Bob Feller, Joe DiMaggio, Hank Greenberg, Warren Spahn, Yogi Berra and others) went to Europe and Japan to serve their country. There was a speech that President Roosevelt gave in the summer of 1941 that was broadcast live to several stadiums that had games going on. Roosevelt wanted the games to continue but it was evident that any able bodied individual was going to go, regardless of what pro sport he was in. Veeck felt that MLB was deficient on stars, very deficient. And bringing in players from the negro leagues was the right thing to do for several reasons.

Veeck's purchasing of the Phillies was personally kiboshed by MLB Commisioner Landis. And the franchise was purchased by an individual who put up a lot less money. Landis would continually deny that he was barring blacks from the game but the results regarding club rosters and his influence with the owners said otherwise. In 1943 Brooklyn Dodger Leo Durocher made the statement to the press that he saw several players in the Negro leagues that could start for his Dodger club. This drew the ire of Landis, who basically bullied Durocher into saying he was misquoted.

Landis's two quotes that I'll always remember:

"The Negroes have their own league. Let them stay in their own league."

"We have talked about this subject before. The answer is no."

Landis passed in 1944 and Albert "Happy" Chandler succeeded him. Though a vote by all the NL owners had Branch Rickey standing alone regarding signing Jackie Robinson, Chandler had been quoted in the papers as saying "if Negroes can go overseas and fight the Germans and the Japanese, why hell, they can play Major League baseball!"

Branch Rickey was indeed important regarding Jackie Robinson breaking the color barrier. It was only two years after that Roy Campanella and Don Newcombe was signed. In the meanwhile Bill Veeck (remember me talking about him) had purchased the Cleveland Indians and signed black players Minnie Minoso, Luke Easter, Satchel Paige, and also Larry Doby, who was the first one signed.

Last edited by DOUBLE H; 04-17-2014 at 10:28 PM.. Reason: addition, spelling
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Old 04-16-2014, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
8,386 posts, read 9,972,941 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red_Devil View Post
He was not even the 1st Negro player in MLB history. Why is there no Roberto Clemente Day for Hispanics? What are your thoughts on the subject?
William Edward White was actually the first black person to ever play in the MLB. The big difference is that he passed himself as White so that White Americans would not discriminate against him. Jackson Robinson on the other hand could not hide his Blackness, so he had to deal with all the racism that came with being the first Black player in the MLB. Even though William Edward White was technically the 1st Black athlete to ever play in the MLB, it didn't really do anything in helping Black baseball players get into the MLB. Once Jackie Robinson arrived, all of that change. I don't blame William Edward White for passing himself off as White because he was playing at a time(1879) that was even more racist than Jackie Robinson's era(1940's). There is no way the majority of people from the late 1800's were ready for a Black athlete in the MLB. If William Edward White had publicly came out as a Black man during his career in the MLB, he would have most certainly been killed by a lynch mob.

William Edward White: The first black player in major-league baseball history lived his life as a white man.

Last edited by gwillyfromphilly; 04-16-2014 at 12:21 PM..
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Old 04-16-2014, 12:22 PM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
8,881 posts, read 15,676,669 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
William Edward White was actually the first black person to ever play in the MLB. The big difference is that he passed himself as White so that White Americans would not discriminate against him. Jackson Robinson on the other hand did not hide his Blackness, so he had to deal with all the racism that came with being the first Black player in the MLB. Even though William Edward White was technically the 1st Black athlete to ever play in the MLB, it didn't really do anything in helping Black baseball players get into the MLB. Once Jackie Robinson arrived, all of that change. I don't blame William Edward White for passing himself off as White because he was playing at a time(1879) that was even more racist than Jackie Robinson's era. There is no way the majority of people from the late 1800's were ready for a Black athlete in the MLB. If William Edward White publicly came out as a Black man, he would have most certainly been killed by a lynch mob.

William Edward White: The first black player in major-league baseball history lived his life as a white man.
Many light-complected blacks passed themselves off as white for many reasons; I'm guessing there were several who did so to play in the Majors. So I don't think William White's story is all that interesting.

The first acknowledged black man to play in the majors was Moses Fleetwood Walker who played for Toledo in 1884, Newark in 1887, and Syracuse in 1888-1889. Although International League owners voted not to extend new contracts to black players in 1987, the rule was modified to allow Walker to sign with Syracuse.
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Old 04-16-2014, 12:51 PM
 
Location: Lake Oswego, Manhattan, Aspen
3,140 posts, read 3,967,754 times
Reputation: 11070
I'd never even HEARD of "Jackie Robinson Day". So, I'm glad to learn that it has ZERO relevance to anything in my life.

I had heard the name. But I thought he was someone who sang those awful oldies so obnoxious that when they're blasted by the Muzak at the grocery, you'll leave a full shopping cart in the middle of the aisle, and hurry out of the grocery store.

And who even cares about Baseball, anyway? The players have the worst bodies in any sport besides Golf. And their uniforms make them even uglier. I had Woodie Allen pegged as a sicko, the second I heard he was a Baseball fan. And sure enough... To me, he seems typical of people who are involved in that waste of time and money.

I've learned to not even glance at the baseball games playing on the TVs in the cardio theatres of gyms. Even half-a-second, and you're likely to see some piece of filth hacking a giant gob of saliva.
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Old 04-16-2014, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Beacon Falls, CT
363 posts, read 291,036 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GrandviewGloria View Post
I'd never even HEARD of "Jackie Robinson Day". So, I'm glad to learn that it has ZERO relevance to anything in my life.

I had heard the name. But I thought he was someone who sang those awful oldies that are so obnoxious that when they're blasted by the Muzak at the grocery, you'll leave a full shopping cart in the middle of the aisle, and hurry out of the grocery store.

And who even cares about Baseball, anyway? The players have the worst bodies in any sport besides Golf. And their uniforms make them even uglier. I had Woodie Allen pegged as a sicko, the second I heard he was a Baseball fan. And sure enough... To me, he seems typical of people who are involved in that waste of time and money.

I've learned to not even glance at the baseball games playing on the TVs in the cardio theatres of gyms. Even half-a-second, and you're likely to see some piece of filth hacking a giant gob of saliva.
Not half as ugly as the ignorance you have displayed in this post, that's for sure.
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Old 04-16-2014, 03:26 PM
 
Location: Shawnee-on-Delaware, PA
3,680 posts, read 3,268,746 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by duster1979 View Post
Many light-complected blacks passed themselves off as white for many reasons; I'm guessing there were several who did so to play in the Majors. So I don't think William White's story is all that interesting.

The first acknowledged black man to play in the majors was Moses Fleetwood Walker who played for Toledo in 1884, Newark in 1887, and Syracuse in 1888-1889. Although International League owners voted not to extend new contracts to black players in 1987, the rule was modified to allow Walker to sign with Syracuse.
Don't forget Fleet's younger brother Welday Wilberforce Walker who played 5 games for Toledo in 1884.

Another footnote in baseball history was Eddie Klep, a white left-handed pitcher who played for the Cleveland Buckeyes in the Negro American League in 1946. The owner of the Buckeyes, seeing that Jackie Robinson had been signed with Brooklyn's farm team the AAA Montreal Royals, wanted to beat the Dodgers to the punch and broke the color barrier "in reverse" as they say, with Klep.

Another color-barrier and glass-ceiling buster in the 1920's was Mrs. Effa Manley, who co-owned the Newark Eagles on the NNL with her husband. Mrs. Manley was a white woman who "passed for black".
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Old 04-16-2014, 03:29 PM
 
Location: southern california
55,237 posts, read 72,506,936 times
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I'm sorry I just can't stop admiring the man
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Old 04-16-2014, 04:55 PM
 
Location: Stuck in NE GA right now
4,585 posts, read 10,496,093 times
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Big fan and I think it's great but I do have a family connection of sorts. My dad went to grade school and HS with him, they played on the same teams and he was a neighbor and was a family friend through out his life. I met him on several occasions growing up and he was a very gracious guy. My dad operated a small electric business and through out his life he sponsored little league and babe ruth teams in our area. My dad went to many many games that JR played in. Our family also have all my father's yearbooks that were signed by JR with obvious notes of close friendship.
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