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Old 04-17-2014, 10:17 AM
 
Location: La Mesa Aka The Table
7,185 posts, read 7,520,266 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red_Devil View Post
Why is it okay for Hank Aaron to make generalized racist comments?
I don't know!
Let me send you some Death Threats, and racist letters for the next 40 plus years and we'll see how you will React
I feel sorry that some people in this country want sweep racism under the rug. Some y'all want to forget racism like it's kissing your cousin, but it doesn't work that way!
Many Players before Jackie Robison had to hide their nationality. Ted Williams, one of the best hitters ever
Had to hide that fact that he was Mexican American.

Last edited by hitman619; 04-17-2014 at 11:20 AM..
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Old 04-17-2014, 11:10 AM
 
2,890 posts, read 5,156,468 times
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It honors MLB - not just Jackie Robinson. It's not about Jackie Robinson being black, it is about a nation that loved a sport enough to shed some of its antiquated beliefs.
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Old 04-17-2014, 01:03 PM
 
Location: North America
18,321 posts, read 11,617,677 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red_Devil View Post
Of course he should be remembered and even have his number retired. I can even understand retiring his #42 on every single team in Baseball. But a yearly day where every single player wears the #42? Doesn't it at some point feel like beating a dead horse just to attract black fans?

Wrong on so many levels. Read up on Jackie Robinson.
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Old 04-17-2014, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
8,880 posts, read 15,639,728 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ovcatto View Post
Well the NBA was formed in 1949 so the first African American depends on how you want to count first.

In the first year of the NBA (1950) Chuck Cooper was the first drafted, the next day Harold Hunter was the first to sign a training camp contract, in May, Nat Clifton was the first to sign with New York Knicks.
The NBA was formed in 1946. 1949 was the year they changed the name from the Basketball Association of America to the National Basketball Association.

Quote:
As for the NFL figuring out the first African American is more problematic than the NBA.
As I said before, there were black players in the NFL in the year of its inception. There was a period of segregation later, but it was integrated again by the time Robinson suited up for the Dodgers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jerseygal4u View Post
You do realize that hispanic baseball players had to play in the Negro leagues at first right?
Black Hispanics did. The first known negro league team was the Cuban Giants of the National Colored Base Ball league; but they played in a negro league because they were black, not because they were Cuban. White Hispanics have played in the majors almost since the beginning.
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Old 04-17-2014, 03:28 PM
 
16,178 posts, read 20,184,521 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hitman619 View Post
I don't know!

Many Players before Jackie Robison had to hide their nationality. Ted Williams, one of the best hitters ever
Had to hide that fact that he was Mexican American.
Hank Greenberg is another. Greenberg came into the Major Leagues in 1933. I've read in various MLB books that there were several players who played came into the league in the 1920's and were Jewish. But they changed their names because they knew they were going to be vilified for being one. Greenberg didn't. While not a super religious individual, regardless, he was proud of his heritage. He didn't give one second to the thought of changing his name.

In Greenberg's 1989 biography author Ira Berkow described how every day of Greenberg's career that he was shouted racial epithets from either the opposing players or from fans from the stands. Every day of his career.

Greenberg also recognized later in life that he didn't know what harrassment truly was until Robinson came up to the league in 1947. If Greenberg went into a store to shop or dined at a restaurant and he was in the company of strangers, getting immediate service usually was the result. Robinson on the other hand was told to leave.

Greenberg played the bulk of his career with the Detroit Tigers and the last year of his 15 year MLB career with the Pittsburgh Pirates. And had one incident with Robinson where there was a collision at first base between the two of them. Greenberg helped him up off the ground and the players and crowd could see a brief conversation among the pair. After the game the newspaper writers asked Robinson what Greenberg said to him. Said Robinson "Jackie, you're going to be a great player. Don't listen to any of this stuff." Robinson said that Greenberg was the first opposing player to encourage him and that "class stands out all over Mr. Greenberg."

Last edited by DOUBLE H; 04-17-2014 at 06:04 PM.. Reason: addition
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Old 04-17-2014, 05:08 PM
 
Location: NY
774 posts, read 701,826 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DOUBLE H View Post
Hank Greenberg is another. Greenberg came into the league in 1933. I've read in various MLB books that there were several players who played came into the league in the 1920's and were Jewish. But they changed their names because they knew they were going to be vilified for being one. Greenberg didn't. While not a super religious individual, regardless, he was proud of his heritage. He didn't give one second to the thought of changing his name.

In Greenberg's 1989 biography author Ira Berkow described how every day of Greenberg's career that he was shouted racial epithets from either the opposing players or from fans from the stands. Every day of his career.

Greenberg also recognized later in life that he didn't know what harrassment truly was until Robinson came up to the league in 1947. If Greenberg went into a store to shop or dined at a restaurant and he was in the company of strangers, getting immediate service usually was the result. Robinson on the other hand was told to leave.

Greenberg played the bulk of his career with Detroit and the last year of his 15 year with the Pittsburgh Pirates. And had one incident with Robinson where there was a collision at first base between the two of them. Greenberg helped him up off the ground and the players and crowd could see a brief conversation among the pair. After the game the newspaper writers asked Robinson what Greenberg said to him. Said Robinson "Jackie, you're going to be a great player. Don't listen to any of this stuff." Robinson said that Greenberg was the first opposing player to encourage him and that "class stands out all over Mr. Greenberg."
Yep, Hank Greenberg was a man of class.
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Old 04-17-2014, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,874 posts, read 12,925,130 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LLN View Post
... We are not gonna get to post - race era as long as every thing positive that ever happened to minorities in the past is brought up year after year ...
But it's OK if we mark Veteran's Day (to honor our veterans), President's Day (to honor important presidents), St. Patrick's Day (to celebrate the contributions of the Irish), Columbus Day (to celebrate the contributions of the Italians), etc., every single year?

How do you feel about Pride Day (to celebrate the contributions of LGBTs), Chinese New Year, Oktoberfest, or Latino History Month? If you don't want to honor Jackie Robinson or Martin Luther King, or Cesar Chavez, or Harvey Milk, or any other minority-Americans of your choice, then feel free to opt-out. But you might want to ask yourself why it's problematic if others do when annual ceremonies honoring white people don't bother you.
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Old 04-17-2014, 07:48 PM
 
Location: Back in the gym...Yo Adrian!
9,371 posts, read 17,494,909 times
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I don't see the problem with honoring the man one day a year. He certainly earned it.
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Old 04-17-2014, 08:51 PM
 
579 posts, read 613,731 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jukesgrrl View Post
He didn't. He said, "We have moved in the right direction, and there have been improvements, but we still have a long ways to go in the country."

The USA might be perfect from your perspective. But from the perspective of Hank Aaron, a black man of extraordinary accomplishment, and me, a white woman of ordinary accomplishments, it's a correct statement. We do, indeed, still have a long way to go before all of us have equal opportunities. Just ask a gay person.
Why did you leave parts of his statement out "“Sure, this country has a black president, but when you look at a black president, President Obama is left with his foot stuck in the mud from all of the Republicans with the way he’s treated. We have moved in the right direction, and there have been improvements, but we still have a long ways to go in the country. The bigger difference is that back then they had hoods. Now they have neckties and starched shirts.”

That's generalized racism

I'm fully aware of the utopian equal opportunity dream. Current day USA is fixated on equality instead of excellence. It's a big reason why the USA is declining socially and academically. But hey, now more people have the opportunity to be mediocre!
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Old 04-17-2014, 09:22 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,874 posts, read 12,925,130 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red_Devil View Post
Why did you leave parts of his statement out "“Sure, this country has a black president, but when you look at a black president, President Obama is left with his foot stuck in the mud from all of the Republicans with the way he’s treated. We have moved in the right direction, and there have been improvements, but we still have a long ways to go in the country. The bigger difference is that back then they had hoods. Now they have neckties and starched shirts.”

That's generalized racism

I'm fully aware of the utopian equal opportunity dream. Current day USA is fixated on equality instead of excellence. It's a big reason why the USA is declining socially and academically. But hey, now more people have the opportunity to be mediocre!
Why'd I leave it out? Because he said "Republicans." He didn't say "white people." The divide today is between those who have and those who don't. People who try to help equalize opportunity, like the president, versus those who are keeping the equalizers "stuck in the mud."

We don't have any shortage of excellence today. And we'll have even more if everybody has an opportunity to pursue excellence, not merely a chosen few.
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