U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Current Events
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 04-29-2014, 08:10 AM
 
28,411 posts, read 14,158,219 times
Reputation: 19545

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Challenger76 View Post
The earthquakes in CA don't come every Spring like clockwork to kill dozens of people. In CA they don't rebuild only to have it all swept away every 5-10 years. Hardly a comparison.

Yes I would leave. I'd never live in in an area notorious for twisters, those things are scary.
???????????

So, are you saying that these same towns get swept away every 5 - 10 years?

If we are talking about scary, it's subjective.

For some people, tornadoes might be scary, but for others, the unpredictability of earthquakes might be worse.

I've seen quite a number of videos where there is significant damage from a tornado where not a single person was killed, because the sirens went off and people sheltered.

I've seen a number of videos of collapsed building and roads from earthquakes which killed people who had no idea that they were about to have 50 tons of concrete drop on top of them.

The comparison is valid.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-29-2014, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
41,074 posts, read 32,757,593 times
Reputation: 57191
I've lived in Tornado Alley for at least half my life...well, more than half now that I think about it. I've never experienced any significant property damage from a tornado. In fact, the worst property damage I ever had was from Hurricane Ike's remnants - I got a new roof out of that one (I live in northeast Texas).

I have, however, seen several funnel clouds and lived in a couple of towns which were hit by tornadoes (no one was killed or seriously injured in any of them). The first tornado experience I had was in North Carolina, when a tornado actually hit the junior high - while 300 teenagers huddled in the hallways with our heads between our knees and our arms crossed over our heads. That was pretty exciting. The gym was destroyed but the main building wasn't directly hit.

Living in Georgia for ten years, I spent several summer afternoons in the root cellar over the years as tornadoes barrelled through. I had some trees come down but no significant property damage.

Nearly every year in Texas I have to take shelter. During one tornado, a nearby lumber yard was struck and our entire neighborhood ended up with pieces of lumber strewn across our yards. I'm sure there was some property damage in that one, but not to me personally. I don't generally worry unless the sirens go off - but when that happens it means that a funnel cloud has been spotted very close by. I have waited those out a few times in my small powder room (interior room with no windows) with two 70 pound dogs and a 17 pound cat - all three of which are weirded out by storms and sirens. That's always an adventure!

The most amazing tornado experience I've ever had though was in 1989 at Fort Hood, Texas. An F-3 tornado actually hit the army post - and I saw the HUGE funnel pass directly over my housing quarters before touching down at the commissary and where the helicopters were stored (several million dollars worth of damage). My roof was actually lifted up and then sat back down, and water was pouring down my walls in the dining room. My kids were huddled in the downstairs bathtub with pillows over their heads but I couldn't tear myself away from watching that funnel - till a lawn chair suddenly slammed into the window right in front of my face! That was what finally convinced me to bolt for the bathroom with a pillow myself!

I have to admit it though - I love storms. I get a huge adrenaline rush from them, the bigger the better! I have never felt actual fear during a tornado, though I have felt alarm a few times.

I am a big believer in "odds." I realize that I have a greater chance of being killed as I drive to the grocery store than I have of being killed in a tornado. Plus, other areas have other risks. When I lived in CA there were earthquakes - same in Japan. When I lived in New Orleans and VA and NC, the big risk was hurricanes. I just don't get too distraught over these things.

That's what property and life insurance is for.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-29-2014, 08:30 AM
 
Location: Lakeland, Florida
6,682 posts, read 11,912,684 times
Reputation: 7904
I've experienced a number of weather related events or earthquakes in my life. From US hurricanes to typhoons in Asia, earthquakes on the US West Coast, and some smaller tornadoes in the Southeast. I would say my view is. The worst even though I have not experienced a very severe one. Are tornadoes. Simply because they are for the most part, a yearly event for several months in the US. To me they are terrifying from what little experience I have had with them. I believe the US is the most prone area for them on earth. So for me I would not want to live in areas, that are in prime territory for them. However if one is from those areas, and its their home and where their roots are, employment and where life brings them happiness. Who am I to say or judge why people live in such areas. Its understandable why they are there. To each their own.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-29-2014, 10:08 AM
 
Location: inside, where it is warm or cool depending on the season
117 posts, read 111,184 times
Reputation: 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
The EF5 Joplin, MO tornado of 2011 killed 161 people. That evening I spotted six funnel clouds forming near us, four to the north and two to the west all at the same time. Thankfully, none of them touched down. Yesterday another tornado came close to Joplin.

In 2012 an EF2 tornado hit Branson, MO and did extensive property damage and another three Missourians lost their lives to that storm system. We live about eight miles and across Table Rock Lake from Branson.

Living in Tornado Alley can certainly be exciting at times and if it's not tornadoes it's severe thunderstorms like we had yesterday and last night, or both or ice storms or straight-line winds. It's merely the price of admission for living in the Ozarks for us and we wouldn't want to be anywhere else in our retirement years.

I guess some people live in and with fear of Mother Nature. We simply don't although we know full well how cranky she can be...
About that 2011 Joplin tornado, it wasn't totally created by mother nature.

5/23/2011 Joplin Missouri Forecast = CORRECT also including clarification on _issues raised - YouTube

The reality is for whatever reasons our government is pulsing the atmosphere which puts energy into the ionosphere and causes the next storm to be more active and stronger than normal. I was watching the radar a few days before the recent tornado outbreak and I saw the pulse on radar and told my wife this next storm would produce damaging tornadoes. Watch the above video(s) by dutch and learn how to spot these radar signatures to predict these violent storms 1-3 days beforehand. One Joplin family was spared in 2011 because they heeded Dutch's advice to leave Joplin when he spotted that radar energy pulse.

Why would the gov't do this? I'm not sure. Weather modification has many uses for humanitarian and military purposes (and to promote the global warming agenda too. btw - the earth goes through cycles of cooling and warming we've entered a cooling cycle that will last another 15 years or so).
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-29-2014, 02:55 PM
 
28,411 posts, read 14,158,219 times
Reputation: 19545
Now, this is getting real interesting.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-29-2014, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Fishers, IN
3,859 posts, read 4,265,996 times
Reputation: 3964
Quote:
Originally Posted by sanantoniomike View Post
About that 2011 Joplin tornado, it wasn't totally created by mother nature.

5/23/2011 Joplin Missouri Forecast = CORRECT also including clarification on _issues raised - YouTube

The reality is for whatever reasons our government is pulsing the atmosphere which puts energy into the ionosphere and causes the next storm to be more active and stronger than normal. I was watching the radar a few days before the recent tornado outbreak and I saw the pulse on radar and told my wife this next storm would produce damaging tornadoes. Watch the above video(s) by dutch and learn how to spot these radar signatures to predict these violent storms 1-3 days beforehand. One Joplin family was spared in 2011 because they heeded Dutch's advice to leave Joplin when he spotted that radar energy pulse.

Why would the gov't do this? I'm not sure. Weather modification has many uses for humanitarian and military purposes (and to promote the global warming agenda too. btw - the earth goes through cycles of cooling and warming we've entered a cooling cycle that will last another 15 years or so).
Seriously?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-29-2014, 03:02 PM
 
Location: zone 5
7,330 posts, read 12,568,423 times
Reputation: 9578
The government purposely manipulated the weather, causing more violent weather, possibly for humanitarian reasons? Makes perfect sense to me!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-29-2014, 03:05 PM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
8,881 posts, read 15,656,789 times
Reputation: 11460
Quote:
Originally Posted by subject2change View Post
Where is safe exactly? You're in the southwest. Are you at risk of wildfire? Will the water supply run out one day?
Not to mention a scorpion sleeping in a shoe or a rattle snake curled up in the tool shed.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-29-2014, 04:00 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,874 posts, read 12,936,498 times
Reputation: 28958
If the OP lives in the Southwest (as I do) she probably IS lucky to be distanced from many natural disasters. Wildfires and some flash floods occur here, but can usually be avoided with care.

But I would ask Miss Hepburn this: if you think people who live in the many areas prone to tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes, landslides, river flooding, etc., etc., should move ... do want the all to go where you are? Crowd you out ... use up your water ... increase the demand for your supply, etc.?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-29-2014, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
41,074 posts, read 32,757,593 times
Reputation: 57191
I'll stay right here in northeast Texas and take my chances.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Current Events
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top