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Old 04-29-2014, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Southwestern, USA
15,230 posts, read 12,036,638 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jukesgrrl View Post
But I would ask Miss Hepburn this: if you think people who live in the many areas prone to tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes, landslides, river flooding, etc., etc., should move ... do want the all to go where you are? Crowd you out ... use up your water ... increase the demand for your supply, etc.?
Ah if it would save lives? Aahhhh...yeeeah.
But the whole SW is pretty darn big and without a lot of
big natural disasters. There is plenty of room.

Why this has become a personal questioning of ME, I dunno...iso...I value my safety
and never should have started this thread!
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Old 04-29-2014, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Virginia
18,717 posts, read 26,849,198 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Miss Hepburn View Post
But the whole SW is pretty darn big and without a lot of
big natural disasters.
Except for enormous wildfires, drought, flash floods when it does rain, massive dust storms, etc. I volunteer fore a fire department, and for my two cents those massive wildfires you get in the west are often the scariest and most dangerous disasters of all.
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Old 04-29-2014, 04:57 PM
 
Location: Manayunk
513 posts, read 597,070 times
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I live in Philadelphia and I guess we are lucky. We don't really have "extreme" weather. We have some snow, but even blizzards aren't that bad. We have rain, but even the "hurricane" wasn't that bad. We had an earthquake that was a 1.5 or something. It felt like a truck crashed on the street. Again, rare. Once in twenty some years rare. Sometimes there are tornadoes but nothing like the d west. Usually a block or two and its over and some trees are downed.

I like living where there's a little of everything with nothing major. We have rain, snow, cold, hot. Sometimes we worry about flooding basements based on if you're near a creek or river but that's the biggest complaint.
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Old 04-29-2014, 08:23 PM
 
12,414 posts, read 7,467,746 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Miss Hepburn View Post
"Yeah, 5 a year would pass through for a couple decades..had to rebuild twice."
You really think thats what happens? My parents have lived in the same house for over 25 years and have never once had damage from a tornado. The house I live in now has been standing for almost 100 years. My grandparents' childhood homes are all still standing, so are my parents. Yes, we have tornadoes around here, but its a pretty small percentage of houses that get destroyed, or even get significant amount of damage. There was a tornado through my parents' neighborhood last summer (EF3). They didn't have any damage at all, their neighbors only had downed tree branches (no damage to the house), a lot of the others needed some repairs to their roof, and only one house was completely destroyed. That is one house out of hundreds of homes in the path of the tornado.

And in the 25 years they have lived at that house, that is the only tornado that has come anywhere close to their house. So thinking that 5 tornadoes pass though each year is completely off. I would be surprised if anyone lived in a home that experienced 5 tornadoes every year. I don't even think there are five tornado touchdowns in the entire metro area in any given year.

Tornadoes happen all across the country, not just the Midwest. I would much rather deal with tornadoes in the Midwest where people are prepared for the storms then somewhere where they are not. When I lived in North Carolina a majority of the homes didn't have basements and there were no tornado sirens in the area. We had a tornado warning at least once a year during the three years we were there. Maybe more because the only way you knew their was a warning was if you were watching the news or had the radio on. Strong storms at night always freaked me out because if something were to happen there were no sirens to wake us up.
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Old 04-29-2014, 09:56 PM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
17,285 posts, read 21,145,307 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PedroMartinez View Post
No. Moving because of this event is like refusing to go to the beach for fear of shark attack.

Miss Hepburn, would you rather live in tornado alley, where there is warning, or California where there is essentially no warnings of earthquakes?
You can build even 100-story buildings in areas of the world prone to earthquakes, and greatly minimize the damage with earthquake-proof construction. So much of the damage, through earthquakes, is the resultant fires, which can be minimized through concrete fire-proof construction.

I've grown all but numb to seeing the pictures of the devastation throughout Tornado Alley, and why aren't they building more earthquake-type construction over there to minimize the damage?

Could it be? Our powerful, lobbying lumber companies wouldn't have it any other way, who laugh all the way to the bank when this happens?
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Old 04-29-2014, 10:56 PM
 
5,772 posts, read 13,703,163 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda_d View Post
About three years ago, there was a tornado that ripped through Randolph, NY, which is about 20 miles east of me. Miraculously, nobody was killed or even injured despite the fact that the thing sliced across and along a state highway, danced along the interstate for a ways, and then plunged down a hill and whipped along Main Street before departing!

Tornadoes aren't supposed to happen here, but they do on very rare occasions. Usually, when they strike in unexpected places, they are often more deadly than in Tornado Alley because most people know how to deal with them.
When I was in high school, a young girl from my home town (junior high school age, if I recall correctly) was killed in a tornado a couple of towns over from us. Not much of a tornado. Had a path a couple of miles long if that, and wasn't reported to be all that strong, but the kid was outdoors, and it happened to strike right where she was. And this wasn't exactly in Tornado Alley. This was in the suburbs of Boston. What are the odds?

And here's one that shows there's never a guarantee. This one combined two unlikely events, a tornado west of the Rockies and a tornado in the downtown of a city:

Salt Lake City tornado, 1999:


Tornado Strikes Salt Lake City - YouTube

Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda_d View Post
I agree. I lived in a small apartment building in Lincoln, NB for 2 years in the 1970s. When the sirens went off, you sort of got dressed, grabbed your flashlight, transistor radio, and headed down to the basement where you huddled with your neighbors until they blasted the all clear.
That's the part that might bug me the most. The inconvenience of this scene you describe would be kind of annoying to go through each year, I'd think. However, it wouldn't stop me from moving to Tornado Alley if I had a reason to be there. In fact, I'm chugging along in a sort of career as what you might call a professional student, with the eventual goal of grad school, and I've considered some schools in the Plains states. One school that's on my long list of possibilities, maybe even the medium list, is Oklahoma State. Truth be told, when I think of living in the south-central states I'm more creeped out by the idea of possibly having those little brown spiders living right in my house than I am about tornadoes.

Which leads to the observation that it's interesting that we got as far into the thread as post 58, page 6

Quote:
Originally Posted by duster1979 View Post
Not to mention a scorpion sleeping in a shoe or a rattle snake curled up in the tool shed.
before anyone moved beyond geophysical hazards and mentioned dangerous animals. Add those to the mix and there aren't a whole lot of options. Almost anywhere you could move to there's something that might get you, so it's best to take reasonable precautions, consider how slim the chances of catastrophe really are, and not worry too much.
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Old 04-30-2014, 04:31 AM
 
Location: Virginia
18,717 posts, read 26,849,198 times
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It's almost the 1 year anniversary of the Yarnell fire in Arizona that, among other things, killed 19 people and destroyed 6,000 acres by the time it was done. Mother Nature has all sorts of overwhelming destructive forces besides tornadoes. I wish there was a place where all the people in this world could move and avoid the force of nature but natural disasters happen everywhere. Sad but true.
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Old 04-30-2014, 06:17 AM
 
Location: Fishers, IN
4,157 posts, read 4,596,357 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tijlover View Post
You can build even 100-story buildings in areas of the world prone to earthquakes, and greatly minimize the damage with earthquake-proof construction. So much of the damage, through earthquakes, is the resultant fires, which can be minimized through concrete fire-proof construction.

I've grown all but numb to seeing the pictures of the devastation throughout Tornado Alley, and why aren't they building more earthquake-type construction over there to minimize the damage?

Could it be? Our powerful, lobbying lumber companies wouldn't have it any other way, who laugh all the way to the bank when this happens?
Sure you can build tornado proof buildings. And I've seen homes with tornado safe rooms. But they aren't common because they are so much more expensive. And even those sometimes can't stand up to a steel or wood beam flying around at 200+ mph.
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Old 04-30-2014, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,462 posts, read 35,935,681 times
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But....if I moved out of Tornado Alley that would mean I would have to move out of Texas...sorry, but that's a negatory! I love living here, tornadoes and all!
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Old 04-30-2014, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,588 posts, read 9,639,933 times
Reputation: 10908
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miss Hepburn View Post
I have no risk of forest fires like so many of my friends do...along with flooding.

Btw, we have water from the snowfall this year for 2 more years they say...that is, if
we got zero...but every year there is snow to add to that.

Yes, water can be an issue...esp in the decades to come.

I live in what I consider to be a safe place.
No more Fla, no more KCMO for me.
Just driving one summer to St. Paul from the SW was scary...I didn't know
what to do as the storm clouds were getting darker....while I was IN
St. Paul a tornado touched down and ripped up many trees in a local park!

I, personally, couldn't do it...my surroundings being safe are very important for my
peace of mind.

Maybe this subject is too touchy...I didn't anticipate that. And I am sorry if
it offends people not moving away and loving their place.

I just personally couldn't do it...maybe I was in a
catastrophic event in a past life.
Not sure where in the S'west you live but I think I live in just about the best place when it comes to 'disasters'. We do have wildfire threats and that season is fast approaching. We have also felt very small, 4.something, earthquakes here. We do have floods sometimes but that's really rare. When they happen they are pretty bad. All of those are pretty rare around here but it's been many years since 'our' mountain had a wildfire and I worry about it more every year. This winter was way too dry and now the winds and warmer weather are drying it all out. Bad...

If I lived in a place where I had to worry about tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, earthquakes, etc. I suppose it would depend on where my family was whether I'd move or not. I'd be living wherever they were, I'm sure. I'm just glad they moved here all those decades ago!
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