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Old 07-17-2014, 06:57 AM
 
418 posts, read 400,993 times
Reputation: 306

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrWillys View Post
I pay $906 a month for 90% coverage, and my wife had to wait 4 months for a dermatologist and had a skin cancer on her face. Insurance paid $900, and we paid $100 and she was in there 1 hour.
4 months is long isn't it? are you in an area with few dermatologists?

I waited about the same time in the USA to see one for a mole check, my daughter waited 2 weeks to see hers.
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Old 07-17-2014, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Gorgeous Scotland
4,123 posts, read 4,591,806 times
Reputation: 3262
Quote:
Originally Posted by BritinUSA View Post
LOL likely!

I was very sick during my pregnancy and needed an IV of saline + zofran via the A&E/ER in the USA and UK.

I was shocked how the same visit/IV/med could be $5000, $8000, $12,000 at one hospital.

Of course in the UK it was free. Hospital was slightly more run down than a few of the above.

I did finally get covered in the USA and had 2 bills wiped clean from before, but it wasn't easy! I don't know for the life of me why a bag of saline + the few bits to deliver it and a med that is 2 quid in the UK can cost so much.

My OB was $500 a visit cash, which was a struggle. When the insurance kicked in they paid him $50 a pop. Why didn't he charge ME $50 a pop.

The OB in the UK was free of course.

Now if I HAD to pay out of pocket for the birth in the UK, the cost? 1300. $2,200 with private room. The US price they quoted was around $30,000. (simple birth 12 hour discharge excluding doctor fees) Of course they could bill me, because they deemed it "needed", how kind of them
Yes, why are the prices so HIGH in the US?

I love the fact that new mothers are entitled to (free) home visits by a health worker after the birth of the child to check on how they are doing, problems with breast feeding, etc.
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Old 07-17-2014, 06:59 AM
 
Location: Gorgeous Scotland
4,123 posts, read 4,591,806 times
Reputation: 3262
Quote:
Originally Posted by BritinUSA View Post
Given I have 2 kids..... if I'm really 10 I think that would be most popular thread on here ever!

I can wear jeans for a 12 year old though
Miracle babies!
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Old 07-17-2014, 07:01 AM
 
418 posts, read 400,993 times
Reputation: 306
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ameriscot View Post
Yes, why are the prices so HIGH in the US?

I love the fact that new mothers are entitled to (free) home visits by a health worker after the birth of the child to check on how they are doing, problems with breast feeding, etc.

From a mother, total waste of space and money those health visitors.

Now in holland they have someone who comes in can do cleaning/household stuff for you, now THAT would be nice

And no idea why the prices are so high, it's a mystery ay? How can boots can the same nasal spray and sell it for 4 and make a profit but it's $80+ in the USA?

I can buy jeans cheaper in the USA (again same place the UK shop gets them from) but nasal spray no? Is it just that they CAN charge more in the USA for meds and if they tried it with jeans as an example people wouldn't go for it?


Asthma inhalers are too costly for many people without insurance in the USA, in the UK again a few quid private cost. Why?

And my friend in Texas couldn't afford the $100+ for hers.
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Old 07-17-2014, 07:05 AM
 
418 posts, read 400,993 times
Reputation: 306
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ameriscot View Post
Miracle babies!

At least their births were free too!
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Old 07-17-2014, 07:09 AM
 
Location: Gorgeous Scotland
4,123 posts, read 4,591,806 times
Reputation: 3262
Quote:
Originally Posted by BritinUSA View Post
From a mother, total waste of space and money those health visitors.

Now in holland they have someone who comes in can do cleaning/household stuff for you, now THAT would be nice

And no idea why the prices are so high, it's a mystery ay? How can boots can the same nasal spray and sell it for 4 and make a profit but it's $80+ in the USA?

I can buy jeans cheaper in the USA (again same place the UK shop gets them from) but nasal spray no? Is it just that they CAN charge more in the USA for meds and if they tried it with jeans as an example people wouldn't go for it?


Asthma inhalers are too costly for many people without insurance in the USA, in the UK again a few quid private cost. Why?

And my friend in Texas couldn't afford the $100+ for hers.
In Scotland (and Wales) we have free prescriptions for everyone. When I told my doctor I was buying OTC allergy meds he insisted on giving me prescriptions for them. I get antihistamines and Flonase nasal spray. Can't even guess what they would cost in the US.

I've known elderly people here who got a prescription for E45 for their dry skin problems. Good deal as it's expensive in the shops.
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Old 07-17-2014, 07:15 AM
 
Location: England
22,415 posts, read 5,552,388 times
Reputation: 29254
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ameriscot View Post
In Scotland (and Wales) we have free prescriptions for everyone. When I told my doctor I was buying OTC allergy meds he insisted on giving me prescriptions for them. I get antihistamines and Flonase nasal spray. Can't even guess what they would cost in the US.

I've known elderly people here who got a prescription for E45 for their dry skin problems. Good deal as it's expensive in the shops.
I used to have a regular prescription for 'Tramadol' painkillers from my doctor. My eldest son said, "boy dad...... you have no idea what those pills are worth on the black market......." I stopped taking them after my back problems improved.
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Old 07-17-2014, 07:20 AM
 
Location: Gorgeous Scotland
4,123 posts, read 4,591,806 times
Reputation: 3262
Quote:
Originally Posted by English Dave View Post
I used to have a regular prescription for 'Tramadol' painkillers from my doctor. My eldest son said, "boy dad...... you have no idea what those pills are worth on the black market......." I stopped taking them after my back problems improved.
Ha!
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Old 07-17-2014, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
5,318 posts, read 2,907,414 times
Reputation: 6786
Quote:
Originally Posted by alphamale View Post
LOL.....that's the sort of response one would expect from a ten year old.

People who can afford to get here from around the globe come to America for serious surgery.

"It is rare that a simple matter of patient choice causes an international flap.

But that's what happened when 60-year-old Danny Williams of St. John's, Newfoundland, decided to go to the U.S. for heart surgery.

That's because Williams isn't just any old Newfoundlander -- he's the premier of Canada's easternmost province, the head of its government.

The disclosure Tuesday that Williams was in an undisclosed location in the U.S., having an undisclosed procedure that he couldn't get in Newfoundland, brought catcalls from both sides of the border.

The New York Post, for instance, in an article headlined "Oh (no), Canada" used the news to take a whack at healthcare reform in the U.S. And the American Thinker blog -- among many others -- argued that Williams' choice is evidence of the inferiority of Canada's "technologically second-rate and rationed system."

In Canada, cardiac specialists defended the premier's decision as a matter of choice and at the same time noted that -- with few exceptions -- most cardiac procedures are both available and done well in Canada.

On the other hand, Newfoundland -- with a population of about 500,000, less than Wyoming -- is less well equipped. Doctors in the province do coronary artery bypass grafts (CABG) and other common procedures, but often send patients elsewhere in the country for transplants or rare operations."
alpha,

Have you any personal experience with the Canadian universal healthcare system, or that of any other western country? I'm from Canada, and I KNOW that your and Henry's knowledge of universal healthcare systems is extremely limited, at best.

This account of Williams is true. It's also only one compared to the tens of millions of Canadians, Brits, French, Australians, Japanese, Germans, Norwegians, etc. who receive excellent care from their country's systems every year.

Now, would you like me to provide evidence of the millions of Americans who would receive NO care, let alone the kind of cardiac care Williams received, because they have no insurance? Or because they were denied treatment by their insurance company? Or of those who are left with overwhelming medical bills as a result of medical care? How about the millions of Americans who, every year, declare bankruptcy due to medical bills?


http://kaiserfamilyfoundation.files....-insurance.pdf


Medical Bills Blamed On More Personal Bankruptcies : NPR


http://www.npaf.org/files/Medical%20...%20Final_0.pdf


http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/0...ype=blogs&_r=0(
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Old 07-17-2014, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Ubique
4,090 posts, read 2,952,888 times
Reputation: 2525
Quote:
Originally Posted by English Dave View Post
As Henry says, the NHS will have to change and adapt in the coming years. Like many other countries we have the boomers born after the war now growing old.
You should heed your own Govt's warnings. As human beings, we have the ability to think ahead. If what you get today means less / worse services and higher taxes for yourself later, and even more for your kids -- then what good is it?

In Denmark they are talking about Age-Integrated Society, which means Govt may delay retirement for seniors, or worse, who knows? Holland goes even further -- end of Welfare.

I wouldn't characterize these as minor things, or adaptations. Europeans have planned their lives for 2-3 generations around these systems. Will you have the stomach for these changes? Any politician who runs on this will get crucified. Who are we kidding here?

As rational human beings, we, you need to think about these things coming your way. Things may seem calm on the surface, but make no mistake, these problems are coming your way.
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