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Old 08-01-2014, 08:07 PM
 
9,197 posts, read 9,278,507 times
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Owner of dog shot by police rejects settlement, calls for policy change | fox13now.com


This story is getting a lot of attention. Here is the gist of it:

A man owns a dog and the dog is in the backyard of his home. The police get a call about a missing child whom they fear could be in abducted or in danger. As part of the process of looking for this missing child, a Salt Lake City police officer enters the backyard of the home where the dog is located. The dog is rather large and charges at the police officer in an aggressive, threatening manner. The officer draws his weapon and kills the dog.

The dog owner brings a claim against the police department. He than subsequently rejects a $10,000 settlement offer saying he believes the police officer who shot his dog should be reprimanded and disciplined.

One thing I wondered is if the police officer got the permission of the property owner to enter his backyard?

In any event, this is what I think:

1. I'd prefer a dog be killed than a police officer be injured.

2. Finding a missing child is pretty important and sometimes the police have to go into odd places to search and do their jobs.

3. If the police were in the wrong, I would think the value of the claim should be limited to what it would cost to get the owner a new dog and nothing more.
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Old 08-01-2014, 08:29 PM
 
Location: Wake County, NC
2,983 posts, read 3,793,432 times
Reputation: 3505
Quote:
Originally Posted by markg91359 View Post
Owner of dog shot by police rejects settlement, calls for policy change | fox13now.com


This story is getting a lot of attention. Here is the gist of it:

A man owns a dog and the dog is in the backyard of his home. The police get a call about a missing child whom they fear could be in abducted or in danger. As part of the process of looking for this missing child, a Salt Lake City police officer enters the backyard of the home where the dog is located. The dog is rather large and charges at the police officer in an aggressive, threatening manner. The officer draws his weapon and kills the dog.

The dog owner brings a claim against the police department. He than subsequently rejects a $10,000 settlement offer saying he believes the police officer who shot his dog should be reprimanded and disciplined.

One thing I wondered is if the police officer got the permission of the property owner to enter his backyard?

In any event, this is what I think:

1. I'd prefer a dog be killed than a police officer be injured.

2. Finding a missing child is pretty important and sometimes the police have to go into odd places to search and do their jobs.

3. If the police were in the wrong, I would think the value of the claim should be limited to what it would cost to get the owner a new dog and nothing more.
I'll assume the answer to this question is NO. I completely disagree with your thoughts on the matter.
If a police officer went into my backyard without my knowledge and killed one of my dogs I would be so livid that I don't know if I could keep my cool. I think the owner is right to reject the settlement and demand discipline of the officer who used very irresponsible judgement.

Imo, this moron should be fired.
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Old 08-01-2014, 08:44 PM
 
Location: mancos
7,178 posts, read 6,471,667 times
Reputation: 4946
The dog should not have been killed on it's own home the cop was a scared chicken unfit for the job period.We had one here do that and he got fired and is now doing time for domestic violence.Bad cops exist,once you give a man a gun and a badge they change.I would never dream of being a cop,I would truly mess you up just for fun.
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Old 08-01-2014, 08:52 PM
 
Location: North Oakland
9,155 posts, read 8,670,530 times
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SLC Police Chief: "The officer did the right thing."


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V3UtfW5PclM#t=27

I partly fault the parents of the "missing" child. Too bad Sean Kendall can't sue them. Officer Olson should at least be fired, though. He was the intruder, not Geist.

Last edited by jay5835; 08-01-2014 at 09:00 PM..
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Old 08-02-2014, 08:51 AM
 
1,661 posts, read 1,995,399 times
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I think the officer was in the right here and agree with you 100%.
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Old 08-02-2014, 08:56 AM
 
Location: 500 miles from home
30,059 posts, read 16,619,946 times
Reputation: 22607
Quote:
Originally Posted by markg91359 View Post
Owner of dog shot by police rejects settlement, calls for policy change | fox13now.com


This story is getting a lot of attention. Here is the gist of it:

A man owns a dog and the dog is in the backyard of his home. The police get a call about a missing child whom they fear could be in abducted or in danger. As part of the process of looking for this missing child, a Salt Lake City police officer enters the backyard of the home where the dog is located. The dog is rather large and charges at the police officer in an aggressive, threatening manner. The officer draws his weapon and kills the dog.

The dog owner brings a claim against the police department. He than subsequently rejects a $10,000 settlement offer saying he believes the police officer who shot his dog should be reprimanded and disciplined.

One thing I wondered is if the police officer got the permission of the property owner to enter his backyard?

In any event, this is what I think:

1. I'd prefer a dog be killed than a police officer be injured.

2. Finding a missing child is pretty important and sometimes the police have to go into odd places to search and do their jobs.

3. If the police were in the wrong, I would think the value of the claim should be limited to what it would cost to get the owner a new dog and nothing more.
I agree with you on most things - but not on this one. The shooting of that dog was absolutely unnecessary and $10,000 is not enough to discourage what, more and more, appears to be a continuing practice amongst our armed protectors.
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Old 08-02-2014, 01:43 PM
 
20,581 posts, read 16,645,141 times
Reputation: 38657
Quote:
Originally Posted by markg91359 View Post
Owner of dog shot by police rejects settlement, calls for policy change | fox13now.com


This story is getting a lot of attention. Here is the gist of it:

A man owns a dog and the dog is in the backyard of his home. The police get a call about a missing child whom they fear could be in abducted or in danger. As part of the process of looking for this missing child, a Salt Lake City police officer enters the backyard of the home where the dog is located. The dog is rather large and charges at the police officer in an aggressive, threatening manner. The officer draws his weapon and kills the dog.

The dog owner brings a claim against the police department. He than subsequently rejects a $10,000 settlement offer saying he believes the police officer who shot his dog should be reprimanded and disciplined.

One thing I wondered is if the police officer got the permission of the property owner to enter his backyard?

In any event, this is what I think:

1. I'd prefer a dog be killed than a police officer be injured.

2. Finding a missing child is pretty important and sometimes the police have to go into odd places to search and do their jobs.

3. If the police were in the wrong, I would think the value of the claim should be limited to what it would cost to get the owner a new dog and nothing more.
I am familiar with this story. When the police exited the woods near the backyard with their police dogs, the dog began barking, which any dog would do.I think they are power mad, all they had to do was have the homeowner bring the dog inside. The dog was in a fenced in yard and no threat to anyone outside the fence.

This was no pitbull attacking, it was a family pet who was barely an adult dog and had never been aggressive and wasn't an aggressive breed, either.

When the police can wantonly kill your pet on your property when the homeowner isn't even suspected of any sort of wrongdoing, something is drastically wrong with our justice system.

Just as bad as the actual shooting, watch the video of the poor distraught man confronting the officers. They are so obvious that they couldn't care less and felt no empathy. The guy was near tears, saying he lost his best friend, and they are holding back snickers. So much for "To Protect and Serve".
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Old 08-02-2014, 07:46 PM
 
5,619 posts, read 3,666,516 times
Reputation: 5434
Quote:
Originally Posted by markg91359 View Post
Owner of dog shot by police rejects settlement, calls for policy change | fox13now.com


This story is getting a lot of attention. Here is the gist of it:

A man owns a dog and the dog is in the backyard of his home. The police get a call about a missing child whom they fear could be in abducted or in danger. As part of the process of looking for this missing child, a Salt Lake City police officer enters the backyard of the home where the dog is located. The dog is rather large and charges at the police officer in an aggressive, threatening manner. The officer draws his weapon and kills the dog.

The dog owner brings a claim against the police department. He than subsequently rejects a $10,000 settlement offer saying he believes the police officer who shot his dog should be reprimanded and disciplined.

One thing I wondered is if the police officer got the permission of the property owner to enter his backyard?

In any event, this is what I think:

1. I'd prefer a dog be killed than a police officer be injured.

2. Finding a missing child is pretty important and sometimes the police have to go into odd places to search and do their jobs.

3. If the police were in the wrong, I would think the value of the claim should be limited to what it would cost to get the owner a new dog and nothing more.
The video was all over the internet of when the owner got home.

The officer did not have permission. He entered a gated back yard.

1) The police officer was trespassing on private property. Dog > cop in that case.

2) This kid if I remember correctly was in the basement. Missing kid or not, trespassing is trespassing. Kids parents are morons.

3) Dogs aren't easily replaced like a lawnmower.
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Old 08-02-2014, 09:51 PM
 
9,197 posts, read 9,278,507 times
Reputation: 28813
Quote:
Originally Posted by LordSquidworth View Post
The video was all over the internet of when the owner got home.

The officer did not have permission. He entered a gated back yard.

1) The police officer was trespassing on private property. Dog > cop in that case.

2) This kid if I remember correctly was in the basement. Missing kid or not, trespassing is trespassing. Kids parents are morons.

3) Dogs aren't easily replaced like a lawnmower.
1. The officer was searching for a missing child and missing children often hide or are found in backyards. I consider a missing child case an emergency, or an exigency. In such a situation a policeman should knock on the door and ask permission to look in the backyard. However, if the homeowner is not available or doesn't answer I can't criticize the choice he made.

2. Whether the kids parents were "morons" or not is irrelevant to me. The point is the kid was missing and possibly in danger.

3. Human beings and their safety should be more important to anyone than that of a dog. If that isn't the case for a particular individual than I suggest they reevaluate their value system.

The one argument I am sort of sympathetic too is the notion that maybe there was a way to check out the backyard safely without shooting Geist. The officer said he was endangered by the actions of the animal though and I am inclined to believe him.

The measure of damages in all other cases for an animal that is killed is the replacement cost of the animal. Some may not like that, but that's the way it is.

I have nothing in particular against dogs, but I don't put them on the same value scale as a human being.
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Old 08-02-2014, 10:23 PM
 
6,657 posts, read 6,833,380 times
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The child was found at home, which tells me that a thorough search of the home was not conducted before the police spread throughout the neighborhood. Small children (if I recall correctly, this child was three) are generally found in their own home or yard.

Trying to figure out how the officer thought the kid got into Geist's backyard, anyway, since the gate latch was above the child's reach. And why the police didn't call animal control rather than shooting a dog that was obviously in the yard.
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