U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Current Events
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 01-11-2015, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,618 posts, read 26,307,193 times
Reputation: 26715

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by ncole1 View Post
Even if her parents have too much income and too many assets? I'm guessing it depends on the state since I have heard horror stories about parents being expected to spend down over $100,000 of retirement savings before they could get any help for a disabled child.
So far we have heard about only one parent. Her father has never been mentioned, so he is either dead or out of the picture.

I do not have any first hand knowledge about CT Medicaid, but Cassandra is a ward of the court. Perhaps Mark can tell us if that makes the state responsible for her medical care.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ncole1 View Post
Depends. Someone who runs away from a very bad home environment involving alcoholism or abuse may indeed be making a rational decision. Such things must be looked at on a case by case basis, not with excessively sweeping generalizations.
Erm, it has been looked at on a "case-by-case basis". In this case, the court determined that running away was a factor demonstrating Cassandra's lack of maturity.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-11-2015, 01:59 PM
 
Location: Sudcaroland
10,664 posts, read 7,731,060 times
Reputation: 31964
Quote:
Originally Posted by FallsAngel View Post
This teen has the mind of, well, a 17 year old. Chemo makes her feel crappy. She'll lose her hair. (From one picture it looks like she already has lost some of it.) This is a tough one. She's almost 18, almost at the age of consent. But almost doesn't count. I think she needs some unbiased information.
Losing hair is a non issue, honestly. Yes, it's very tough psychologically for the one who loses it, but a nice wigs can honestly do a great job in helping cope with the new physical appearance. I have met lots of kids and teens, especially girls, who wore wigs so nicely done you thought it was still their real hair. And with love and support, it can be a little easier on the patient too. They definitely can get moral support from the hospital staff that treats them, too.
Hair loss is honestly the mildest side effect cancer patients have.

Last edited by Sudcaro; 01-11-2015 at 02:12 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-11-2015, 02:04 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,089 posts, read 99,190,340 times
Reputation: 31569
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sudcaro View Post
Losing hair is a non issue, honestly. Yes, it's tough on the one who loses it, but a nice wigs can honestly do a great job. I have met lots of kids and teens, especially girls, who wore wigs so nicely done you thought it was still their real hair. And with love and support, it can be a little easier on the patient.too.
Hair loss is honestly the mildest side effect cancer patients have.
I certainly agree! However, I might not have felt that way at 17. My daughters probably wouldn't have felt that way at 17 either. You get a little older and you value life a little more.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-11-2015, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, Pa
1,417 posts, read 1,486,990 times
Reputation: 1566
Quote:
Originally Posted by markg91359 View Post
But she isn't 18 and 18 is the age required to make these decisions.

"Almost" only counts in games horseshoes and checkers.

I do have one question: If the patient doesn't want to cooperate receiving this treatment does giving the treatment present insurmountable difficulties for the practitioners giving it?

Perhaps the system is wrong? You said in a previous post that it is based of the assumption that minors are incompetent in making their own decisions.

I feel that we base to much off the age of 18. People reach maturity at their own rate. Some earlier than others, I've met young men and women who were younger than 17 who act more responsible and mature than those over 18.

Furthermore, it is her body and I believe she has the right to decide. This girl is not incompetent. Furthermore, I think it is incredibly inhumane to force something like this on anybody.

We cripple our children by allowing them to think that they need to be a certain age to make a decision.

No one is going to hold your hand and tell you what to do when you turn that "magical" age of 18.

There is no difference from being 17 with 364 days as oppose to 18 and 1 day.
It is completely irrelevant. We're not talking about a 7 year old, we're talking about someone who is a young adult and who knows what she wants for herself.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-11-2015, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Sudcaroland
10,664 posts, read 7,731,060 times
Reputation: 31964
Quote:
Originally Posted by FallsAngel View Post
I certainly agree! However, I might not have felt that way at 17. My daughters probably wouldn't have felt that way at 17 either. You get a little older and you value life a little more.
As I said, I met lots of teens with cancer while my little girl was getting treatments. Easy? No. But the medical team should / will help with this. A lot.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-11-2015, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,618 posts, read 26,307,193 times
Reputation: 26715
Quote:
Originally Posted by chris123678 View Post
Perhaps the system is wrong? You said in a previous post that it is based of the assumption that minors are incompetent in making their own decisions.

I feel that we base to much off the age of 18. People reach maturity at their own rate. Some earlier than others, I've met young men and women who were younger than 17 who act more responsible and mature than those over 18.

Furthermore, it is her body and I believe she has the right to decide. This girl is not incompetent. Furthermore, I think it is incredibly inhumane to force something like this on anybody.

We cripple our children by allowing them to think that they need to be a certain age to make a decision.

No one is going to hold your hand and tell you what to do when you turn that "magical" age of 18.

There is no difference from being 17 with 364 days as oppose to 18 and 1 day.
It is completely irrelevant. We're not talking about a 7 year old, we're talking about someone who is a young adult and who knows what she wants for herself.
My son at 13 was more responsible and mature than this 17 year old.

The court decided that not wanting to lose your hair is not a mature reason to refuse a life saving medical treatment.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-11-2015, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, Pa
1,417 posts, read 1,486,990 times
Reputation: 1566
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
My son at 13 was more responsible and mature than this 17 year old.

The court decided that not wanting to lose your hair is not a mature reason to refuse a life saving medical treatment.
Poor excuse.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-11-2015, 03:55 PM
Status: "A delicate snowflake with the vote of a wolverine." (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: Houston, TX
13,314 posts, read 7,502,883 times
Reputation: 27486
Quote:
Originally Posted by chris123678 View Post
Perhaps the system is wrong? You said in a previous post that it is based of the assumption that minors are incompetent in making their own decisions.

I feel that we base to much off the age of 18. People reach maturity at their own rate. Some earlier than others, I've met young men and women who were younger than 17 who act more responsible and mature than those over 18.

Furthermore, it is her body and I believe she has the right to decide. This girl is not incompetent. Furthermore, I think it is incredibly inhumane to force something like this on anybody.

We cripple our children by allowing them to think that they need to be a certain age to make a decision.

No one is going to hold your hand and tell you what to do when you turn that "magical" age of 18.

There is no difference from being 17 with 364 days as oppose to 18 and 1 day.
It is completely irrelevant. We're not talking about a 7 year old, we're talking about someone who is a young adult and who knows what she wants for herself.
Exactly. I noticed that no one who claims that this girl is incompetent to decide for herself at age 17 responded to my observation about how the public usually demands that juveniles get tried as adults when they commit serious crimes. The reasoning behind this is that they are fully capable of understanding their actions, thus they need to be tried as adults. So how is it right for juvenile criminals to be held fully responsible for hurting other people, yet this teenage girl is not considered competent enough to determine what she can do to her own body? I'd love to hear from the attorney about this, if he/she is still reading this thread.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-11-2015, 03:59 PM
 
179 posts, read 173,883 times
Reputation: 312
After having several friends die from the treatments rather than the cancer I hope if I ever get cancer I will have the option to decline treatment.

I feel so bad for the girl having to be forced for unwanted treatment.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-11-2015, 04:29 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
9,485 posts, read 16,487,394 times
Reputation: 13216
I'm going to veer off in another direction with this and suggest that the girl's negative attitude about treatment will likely render the treatment less effective or even make it more likely to harm her. I have no doubt that everyone here has heard of the placebo effect, but how many have heard of the nocebo effect? That's when you suffer the side effects of a drug, even if it's just a sugar pill. Also, the mind/body connection can be so strong that when you think the treatment will harm you, it's very likely that you'll turn out to be right. I hope that won't be the case with this young lady and despite my holistic medicine leanings, I would take the treatment if I were her (I think) but I am sick that they're forcing it on her. I hope I'm wrong, but I doubt this will turn out well. I'm hoping that they'll allow her the use of complementary therapies to help with SE and make it less likely that she will succumb to the nocebo effect. A good link to this: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/12/op...bo-effect.html
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Current Events
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top