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Old 01-20-2015, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Eretz Yisrael
21,345 posts, read 23,991,175 times
Reputation: 8853

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Quote:
Originally Posted by vision33r View Post
...

The need to create a niche or invent something new. There are tons of these iphone repairs shops or place you can help people customize your phones and instead of doing that all they do is sell phones like all these other mall booths.

...

Actually they're doing repairs again.

Screen Repair - Mobile Device Screen Repair Service | RadioShac
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Old 01-22-2015, 09:48 PM
 
124 posts, read 100,742 times
Reputation: 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by vision33r View Post
I think RS is mismanaged. They have the brand name to reinvent themselves but they haven't.
This where we should all learn from the experience. Does top management come from business schools? Or do they come from working in electronics? Company that replace product oriented management with business school management start the process of bankruptcy by using cost controls and financial analysis rater than learn about the product and what customers want.

It took no genius to learn why GM was a failing company. Starting about 40 years ago, people who comes from where the work gets done (the Car Guys) were replaced by people who did not even know how to drive cars (Bean Counters). As a result, GM used cost controls, blame unions, underfunded the pension funds, and even zero percent financing to protect executive bonus while stifling innnovation.

Companies that innovate change with the decades. I understand Fry's was a grocery store that started selling electronics parts. Then upgraded to electronics appliances as the market changed.

3M was a mining company that innovated so much as to change - to become a world leader in tapes and glues.

HP was a audio sound company that moved into electronic instrumentation, and eventually into computers. Then stole the printer business from non-innovating companies such as Xerox. HP changed with each decade when top management came from where the work gets done.

How often do Radio Shack executives sell things in stores. Executives in Federal Express periodically deliver packages. Executives in SW Air sometimes work as part of the flight crew. Executives from Walmart do same. Therefore Walmart once identified a major marketting error in October - saved their Christmas season that year. A TV show, Undercover Boss, identifies companies that should be failing. A boss has no idea how the work gets done.

Radio Shack's market has changed. Innovative companies see that and upgrade their product lines. Clayton Christensen's Innovators Dilemma discusses this. Backruptcy is necesssary because some companies have business school trained executives who therefore cannot see an innovation even if it is sucked up their nose.

And so the top most question. Where do Radio Shack's executives come from? What did they do to have experience in electronics products? Or are these guys trained in schools that say any good manager can manage any business. True - into the ground.
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Old 01-23-2015, 05:56 AM
 
Location: MMU->ABE->ATL->ASH
9,110 posts, read 17,054,828 times
Reputation: 9959
Here is the Executive Mgmt Team ->
RadioShack Corporation - Investor Relations - Corporate Governance: Leadership
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Old 01-23-2015, 06:34 AM
 
Location: Hiding from Antifa?
6,343 posts, read 4,139,952 times
Reputation: 5654
Quote:
Originally Posted by westom View Post
This where we should all learn from the experience. Does top management come from business schools? Or do they come from working in electronics? Company that replace product oriented management with business school management start the process of bankruptcy by using cost controls and financial analysis rater than learn about the product and what customers want.

It took no genius to learn why GM was a failing company. Starting about 40 years ago, people who comes from where the work gets done (the Car Guys) were replaced by people who did not even know how to drive cars (Bean Counters). As a result, GM used cost controls, blame unions, underfunded the pension funds, and even zero percent financing to protect executive bonus while stifling innnovation.

Companies that innovate change with the decades. I understand Fry's was a grocery store that started selling electronics parts. Then upgraded to electronics appliances as the market changed.

3M was a mining company that innovated so much as to change - to become a world leader in tapes and glues.

HP was a audio sound company that moved into electronic instrumentation, and eventually into computers. Then stole the printer business from non-innovating companies such as Xerox. HP changed with each decade when top management came from where the work gets done.

How often do Radio Shack executives sell things in stores. Executives in Federal Express periodically deliver packages. Executives in SW Air sometimes work as part of the flight crew. Executives from Walmart do same. Therefore Walmart once identified a major marketting error in October - saved their Christmas season that year. A TV show, Undercover Boss, identifies companies that should be failing. A boss has no idea how the work gets done.

Radio Shack's market has changed. Innovative companies see that and upgrade their product lines. Clayton Christensen's Innovators Dilemma discusses this. Backruptcy is necesssary because some companies have business school trained executives who therefore cannot see an innovation even if it is sucked up their nose.

And so the top most question. Where do Radio Shack's executives come from? What did they do to have experience in electronics products? Or are these guys trained in schools that say any good manager can manage any business. True - into the ground.
This is the chief problem in the industry I work in. For the first 25 years I told myself that I would work until I die, because I like the job so much. Then it went to if I hit the lottery I would give them a couple months to replace me. Then it became two weeks. Now I am counting the days(198) until I turn 65 and can qualify for Medicare. Everyone has gone from being customer oriented to being concerned about the bottom line, this quarter.

Back in the eighties, I took a business course at a local community college. The "professor" was enamored with GE style of management and how so many companies followed their lead. He didn't know that I was working for GE at the time. Jack Welch was the CEO. When I started working for them in 1980 there were 400,000 employees in GE. When I finally got fed up in 1986 and left, on my own power, there were 300,000 employees. I blame GE and Jack Welch for the death of corporate loyalty to employees.

When I was there, supervisors were picked from the ranks of employees. They would have to move to a new area when they transitioned into management, though, which makes sense when you think about it. Now it is business school grads in management positions who have no idea of what the customer really needs.
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Old 01-23-2015, 06:51 AM
 
Location: Southeastern North Carolina
1,790 posts, read 3,266,422 times
Reputation: 3157
The last time I went into a Radio Shack, I bought a cable for $10. I could've gotten it on Amazon for $2, but I wanted it today. And then the cashier tried to sell me an extended warranty. On a cable.
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Old 01-23-2015, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Billings, MT
9,523 posts, read 7,782,324 times
Reputation: 13259
I have stopped in at the local RS looking for PL-259 coax terminals. They either had none in the drawer, or they had 2. I asked for an SO-239. The gal didn't even know what it was!
For Amateur Radio operators and CBers, the stores are now just "The Shack". There is no "Radio" any more, hasn't been for years. while they might have a few low-end CB antennas, and 1 or 2 radios, they have NO ham gear at all, other than some 50 ohm coax and (maybe) a 10 meter or 2 meter antenna.
It is really quite sad to see a business lose its way like that.
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Old 01-23-2015, 01:34 PM
 
Location: Billings, MT
9,523 posts, read 7,782,324 times
Reputation: 13259
Quote:
Originally Posted by westom View Post
This where we should all learn from the experience. Does top management come from business schools? Or do they come from working in electronics? Company that replace product oriented management with business school management start the process of bankruptcy by using cost controls and financial analysis rater than learn about the product and what customers want.

It took no genius to learn why GM was a failing company. Starting about 40 years ago, people who comes from where the work gets done (the Car Guys) were replaced by people who did not even know how to drive cars (Bean Counters). As a result, GM used cost controls, blame unions, underfunded the pension funds, and even zero percent financing to protect executive bonus while stifling innnovation.

Companies that innovate change with the decades. I understand Fry's was a grocery store that started selling electronics parts. Then upgraded to electronics appliances as the market changed.

3M was a mining company that innovated so much as to change - to become a world leader in tapes and glues.

HP was a audio sound company that moved into electronic instrumentation, and eventually into computers. Then stole the printer business from non-innovating companies such as Xerox. HP changed with each decade when top management came from where the work gets done.

How often do Radio Shack executives sell things in stores. Executives in Federal Express periodically deliver packages. Executives in SW Air sometimes work as part of the flight crew. Executives from Walmart do same. Therefore Walmart once identified a major marketting error in October - saved their Christmas season that year. A TV show, Undercover Boss, identifies companies that should be failing. A boss has no idea how the work gets done.

Radio Shack's market has changed. Innovative companies see that and upgrade their product lines. Clayton Christensen's Innovators Dilemma discusses this. Backruptcy is necesssary because some companies have business school trained executives who therefore cannot see an innovation even if it is sucked up their nose.

And so the top most question. Where do Radio Shack's executives come from? What did they do to have experience in electronics products? Or are these guys trained in schools that say any good manager can manage any business. True - into the ground.
OH, that sounds SO familiar! I once worked for a major metals extraction company, a subsidiary of a major oil company. They brought in "Business Consultants" to improve the efficiency of the operation.
Some of the things that the consultants instituted were :
1. first line supervisors (foremen) should have a college degree.
2. Second line supervisors must have a Bachelors degree (not necessarily in the discipline they are supervising). Thus they had electrical engineers supervising mechanics and millwrights!
3. A foreman does not have to be a craftsman. A rolling stock mechanic can supervise Industrial Electricians and Ironworkers, no problem. (this is true if the foreman doesn't have to know anything other than how to sign a timecard.)
They had a RIF with a pretty good severance, so, since I knew I was going nowhere without a Bachelor's degree, I volunteered for it, took the 12 grand, and left.
The plant has been closed for several years, and will undoubtedly never reopen.
What happened to the "consultants" I don't know.
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Old 01-23-2015, 04:22 PM
 
26,198 posts, read 18,898,328 times
Reputation: 14041
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaseMan View Post
I've heard it's a horrible place to work. I recall some website (Deadpsin?) had a pretty good rundown of RS from a former employee.
That was an epic read, but the reader responses were even better.
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Old 01-23-2015, 05:25 PM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
21,230 posts, read 14,261,055 times
Reputation: 15725
When I worked for them briefly in 1989, I was stunned to learn the stores didn't use a cash register. All they used were cash boxes. It blew me away to think that an electronics retail store was using such primitive devices as cash boxes. They went out in the 1800s.

No cash register meant that all sales tickets had to be hand written, and a bagful of small parts could take 10 minutes or more just to write up. An electronic register of the day could do it in a minute or less. That was stone crazy when the company was selling engineering calculators! I always wondered why the management didn't use one of their own products to figure out how much better a good cash register would be.

I think that is an indication of some of Radio Shack's problems. For a long time, it seemed they were ahead of the game in retail electronics and far behind developing trends at the same time. Radio Shack sold the first retail computer. It used a cassette deck for file storage and was hell to program, but it worked.
And then, in less than a year, it was obsolete due to Microsoft's ability to sell it's first operating system. Why Radio Shack wasn't first in line to lease MSDOS was always a mystery to me, because they were already making a computer that could use it.

I thought they did have a lot of excellent home hi-fi and similar gear then. I skated into the job, and soon learned it was next to impossible to make any money working for them, so I skated right back out and went back to performing for the rest of the year.
They always had a lot of turnover because of their wage practices. All the money for the sales staff was in the extended warranties, but there was far too much stuff in the store that didn't offer a warrantee, and a lot of other stuff, like small radios and other portables that an extended warrantee wasn't worth the extra money at all, and no customers ever bought the warrantees for those products.

Selling the warrantees was always luck of the draw, too. A sales person could be busy all day for a solid week or more selling nothing but batteries, parts, small items, etc., making only minimum wage, and could be writing up a $2.00 ticket while watching another sales person score when a customer walked in to buy a big stereo or a computer. That sales person would make $100 more than the other guy just because he happened to be randomly idle at the the right moment.
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Old 01-23-2015, 08:22 PM
 
124 posts, read 100,742 times
Reputation: 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by banjomike View Post
For a long time, it seemed they were ahead of the game in retail electronics and far behind developing trends at the same time. Radio Shack sold the first retail computer. It used a cassette deck for file storage and was hell to program, but it worked.
And then, in less than a year, it was obsolete due to Microsoft's ability to sell it's first operating system. Why Radio Shack wasn't first in line to lease MSDOS was always a mystery to me, because they were already making a computer that could use it.
Discover that changed when business school graduates slowly took control of Radio Shack over a few decades.

Product oriented thinkers see failures at least four or more years before problems appear as ripples on spread sheets. For example, the first computer I built was from an 8080 microprocessor bought in Radio Shack. Current technology then. Radio Shack also carried TTL logic when that also was still new technology. Then business school graduates started cost controlling the inventory. This stated in most industries in the late 1960s or early 1970s.

Radio Shack sold a seven segment (displays a digit) display that used (if I remember) a common anode. A TTL chip would convert binary into that seven segement number. But Radio Shack's TTL driver chip was designed for common cathode. Their seven segment display and digital chip to drive that display were incompatible.

Any product person could see that. But he clearly was from finance. In business, there are only product people and finance types. Those incompatible parts immediately identified a business school graduate making electronic part decisions. Another example:

Radio Shack sold numerous diodes including many 1N400x and 1N5918. The many 1N400x diodes were all simular. RS could sell only a 1N4005 and still provide product for 100% of their customers. But a business school graduate was making decisions. The 1N5819 (that did something completely different) may have been 8% of diode sales. Since that was the least selling diode, then a bean counter eliminated it using cost control logic. So RS lost 8% of their customers. Had he kept selling a 1N5819 and eliminated the 1N4001, 1N4002, 1N4003, and 1N4004, then he still has 100% of his customers. But he was using spread sheet analysis. He had no idea what products do. RS stopped selling the 1N5819.

No example of "business school graduates destroying American industries" can be explained in a sound byte. Why businesses destroy jobs is too long for people trained in sound byte logic and spread sheet analysis. So many have no idea why companies such as Radio Shack, Kodak, Xerox, GM, IBM (under Akers and Cannavino), AT&T, Polaroid, HP (under Young and Fiorina), NCR (especially when AT&T ran it into the ground), Apple (under Sculley and Spindler), etc contributed to job losses and reduced productivity. In every case, they were doing exactly what is taught in business schools and knew absolutely nothing about product. Akers of IBM did not know what a computer did. Fiorina in the HP/Comapq merger meeting had no idea what employees were saying. She insisted that being #1 or #2 in an industry meant higher profits. Wrong. Innovation means higher profits and then becoming #1 or #2. But she only understood what business school teach - ie economy of scale.

President of Kodak, after a press conference, asked news photographers why they were using Fuji film. He was told and completely ignored what these professional photographers - all of them - were telling him. He did not understand film.

Board of Directors for Apple reappointed Spindler. Then were shocked at profanity cast down upon them by Apple stockholders. But then the entire BoD (except Amelio) knew nothing about computers, electronics, software or any related industry. One was a professional spokeswoman. It took profanity to get their attention and eventually fire Spindler. They only understood profanity - and not what Apple Computer did.

These examples are not exceptions. They are why most every company fails. The President of GM did not even know how to drive. Top management ignorance is why their companies cannot innovate. Radio Shack is simply another example of what happens when management is educated in business school concepts and not in how the work gets done.
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