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Old 01-16-2015, 09:52 AM
 
5,445 posts, read 4,398,223 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emigrations View Post
I had a lot of good memories at Radioshack back in the 1990s-early 2000s. I was into computer building and overclocking in high school (early 2000s) and it was really the only place one could go get electronics, small parts and electrical items for projects.

That DIY electronic (not necessarily tech) tech crowd seems to be kind of on its last legs, as most things can be cheaply preassembled and are fairly disposable in nature.

Fry's Electronics has really inherited the DIY, electronics crowd that Radioshack once had IMO.

I loved Fry's when I lived out in California. I wish we had one here in Colorado.
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Old 01-16-2015, 01:19 PM
 
Location: Maryland not Murlin
8,185 posts, read 21,745,007 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by City Guy997S View Post
Amazon did more damage to RS than anything else. Brick and Mortar stores are showrooms for internet retailers like Amazon, you go look at the local store and then buy online when you get home for less money!

Camera stores, electronics, game stores, book stores........all dying while Amazon just gets bigger.
Yup. Spot on.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JBtwinz View Post
The trouble is, innovation, technology and consumer driven wants are what makes and breaks retail today.

Radio Shack win or lose is now a dinosaur through their own fault much like Blockbuster, Sears, Kmart and many others.

As mentioned not much of the population takes apart and trouble shoots electronics. How many people really are concerned about sound systems for the home when your Apple product can be docked into a device for quality sound. 15 years go I needed to go to a Sprint store to pick out a cell phone.....at that time Radio Shack was the place to go. 15 years ago I also built a home and pre wired for surround sound..............everything is going wireless now...who needs plugs and adaptors, an HDMI cord is now the savior of AV cords.

Bottom line....these business schools need to throw out the text books and start teaching about what innovation and technology is all about and that unless you are exploring innovation everyday you are going to lose!

Kodak who had tremendous R&D believed that film could not go extinct.

Surely someone at Blockbuster must have thought during the infancy and early stages of Netflix that they were soon to be dealing with a monster and they needed to get onboard to compete.

Smart phones are taking market share from digital camera's and GPS units.

Some of these examples above are why business's are fading away!

Bottom line....Radio Shack needed to reinvent themselves years ago, but I cannot honestly think of a product line they could sell. Those days of stand alone stores for computers, TV's and electronics are gone.

The internet is a black hole that is devouring anything that is and was sold in stores!

Any thoughts on what Radio Shack could model themselves into if they manage to save some stores to be successful?
I disagree. There is a rather large, and growing, hobby that concerns itself with building things with RaspberryPI and Adrino boards, amongst others, homemade robotics, wireless chargers, gaming systems, musical devices, etc. for hobby, recreation, and competition. Hacking culture is alive and growing every day; and by hacking I mean DIY electronics/gizmos, not breaking code. To be honest, it is bigger today than it was 30 years ago. The 4H club I used to participate with years ago now builds robots for competition.

As for home theater/stereo systems; I agree that most just use their iPhones or what-ever but believe me when I say that the U.S. is home to many audiophiles.

As for smart phone cameras....anyone who fancies himself a photographer uses at least a low-end DSLR.
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Old 01-16-2015, 01:21 PM
 
Location: Maryland not Murlin
8,185 posts, read 21,745,007 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emigrations View Post
.

Fry's Electronics has really inherited the DIY, electronics crowd that Radioshack once had IMO.
I love Fry's. Too bad the only locations I am aware of are in California.
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Old 01-16-2015, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Sunrise
10,869 posts, read 13,642,840 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K-Luv View Post
I love Fry's. Too bad the only locations I am aware of are in California.
Nevada as well.

I am squarely Fry's target market -- tinkerer and DIYer. But I buy my stuff online from specialty stores. For instance, if I'm going to build a set of speakers, I'm going to the high-end DIY online speaker store. Better quality, better value (even though the prices are higher), better information from the people who work there.

All brick and mortar is in trouble except for convenience purchases; and purchases where the thought of an online return makes purchasing from a B&M worth the extra cost and hassle. (Big screen TVs for instance. Nobody wants to have to box up and return an 80" television if it arrives DOA. That, too, may change.)
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Old 01-16-2015, 01:40 PM
 
6,981 posts, read 4,175,511 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by budlight View Post
Radio Shack did not evolve with the times. They got killed by similar products being sold at a better price at other electronics stores, including Wal-Mart. They used to have employees who knew about electronics. Those days are over.
I agree. They just sat back watched their demise. What they COULD have done is change their name to Radio Shaq and get Mr O'Neill to be their spokesman. They would still be around today if that happened.
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Old 01-16-2015, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
11,048 posts, read 11,460,740 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K-Luv View Post
I love Fry's. Too bad the only locations I am aware of are in California.
There's one just south of Portland at Wilsonville. It draws electronics enthusiasts from miles around. It's like having a Tiger Direct that you can actually walk into. Get there early when the sale ads come out, or they will be sold out.
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Old 01-16-2015, 07:36 PM
 
Location: League City, Texas
2,813 posts, read 4,313,408 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K-Luv View Post
I love Fry's. Too bad the only locations I am aware of are in California.
We have Fry's in Texas. The one near me has a NASA theme (near the JSC---another thread about anachronism ).

Radio Shack was always the place to go for anything electronic. I grew up going to the local store with my Daddy in the sixties. I remember the tube testers, & how you could describe what you were needing for your project--the employees could immediately tell you (and find) exactly what you were looking for.

The last time I remember Radio Shack having any relevancy was in the early/mid-90s when we were shopping for our first PC. It was a place that had actual computers that you could touch & play around with, and employees who could, at least, halfway explain things.

My first car radio (AM), installed in my 67 Austin-Healy, was a Realistic.

RIP, Radio Shack!
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Old 01-17-2015, 01:48 AM
 
Location: Northern NJ
7,405 posts, read 7,363,057 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by s1alker View Post
Everything in my local RS is far overpriced compared to Walmart, Target, and online vendors like Amazon. I was looking for a cell phone car charger, RS wanted $20 when I could pick it up at Walmart for $9. Yes, RS used to pride itself on electronics parts for hobbyists, but really not many people do those kinds of DIY projects anymore.
That's the problem in a nutshell. Everything is completely utterly disposable. There is nothing to fix anymore. There is no reason to go under the hood, because even if you get there, you are dealing with ultra-miniaturization and most people could not begin to diagnose a problem with a part, assuming they could even identify the part.

Televisions, stereos, phones, appliances. They break. You dump them and buy a new one without a second thought. I remember when Radio Shack had bins and drawers and hangers filled with thousands of electronics parts. Capacitors, transistors, resistors, potentiometers, switches, adapters, vacuum tubes, kits, all kinds of cool stuff. That gradually changed. Nobody needed that stuff anymore, and they started trying to compete with Verizon or Apple. Game over.

Sad. I still build my own computers from an empty case. It's a lot of fun and I can hand select each component based on its individual performance. But all the parts I need are online or at Micro Center in Paterson. Radio Shack stopped selling anything useful to me eons ago. Like Blockbuster, CompUSA and Computer City, they failed to stay relevant.

Who could forget the slow as molasses Tandy personal computer. What a hoot! I did use it however, it was semi-useful for a few years.

Goodbye Radio Shack. I will miss what you were rather than what you have become.
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Old 01-17-2015, 08:49 AM
 
3,070 posts, read 1,626,098 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K-Luv View Post
Yup. Spot on.


I disagree. There is a rather large, and growing, hobby that concerns itself with building things with RaspberryPI and Adrino boards, amongst others, homemade robotics, wireless chargers, gaming systems, musical devices, etc. for hobby, recreation, and competition. Hacking culture is alive and growing every day; and by hacking I mean DIY electronics/gizmos, not breaking code. To be honest, it is bigger today than it was 30 years ago. The 4H club I used to participate with years ago now builds robots for competition.

As for home theater/stereo systems; I agree that most just use their iPhones or what-ever but believe me when I say that the U.S. is home to many audiophiles.

As for smart phone cameras....anyone who fancies himself a photographer uses at least a low-end DSLR.
These types of hobbies are definitely popular in certain areas, but what about the other 95% of the country? And what do their adherents all have in common? They want the lowest possible price, and they are extremely Internet savvy. No local store can compete with the infinite availability and the next day shipping at the lowest price that these hobbyists have at their fingertips, unless there is a huge concentration of said hobbyists.
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Old 01-17-2015, 09:37 AM
 
Location: Western Colorado
10,521 posts, read 11,632,560 times
Reputation: 24173
I miss the old Radio Shack before they all turned into cell phone stores. You could actually buy ham radio from them, parts, connectors, kits.
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