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Old 01-17-2015, 08:55 AM
 
Location: Type 0.7 Kardashev
10,577 posts, read 7,239,673 times
Reputation: 37457

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Quote:
Originally Posted by escapenc View Post
"I'm a Christian. I don't gamble," said Fay Blake, 62. "Spiritually, it bothers me."
You bought a lottery ticket.
When it turned out to be a winner, you cashed it in.

Thus, you gamble.

Quote:
The Florida Lottery paid Blake $3,750,000 her winnings minus taxes and sent out a news release Thursday about her good fortune, though she pleaded with the agency to neither photograph her nor identify her. The photo is optional, but identification is not, Florida Lottery spokeswoman Shelly Gerteisen said.

Lottery winners cannot remain anonymous because some people, notably lottery employees themselves, are not allowed to play.

Blake said she had hoped to avoid publicity about her winnings for fear of shaming her church.

"I love my church, and I love my church family," she said.

Blake said her pastor has preached against gambling, and she usually takes his sermons to heart. But "impulse" led her to the lottery terminal at Publix on Edgewater Drive, she said. There was no line when she approached the kiosk with $1 and chose Quick Pick, an option in which a computer selects the numbers to play.

Her ticket matched five of the white-ball numbers in the televised Jan. 9 drawing, which would have earned a jackpot of $221 million if Blake's entry also would have matched the so-called yellow "Mega Ball." She won a $5 million consolation prize instead of $1 million because she plopped down an extra dollar for the "Megaplier."

Blake said she was uncertain how she would explain her moment of weakness to her pastor.
'moment'?

You bought the ticket.
You held onto the ticket for days.
You checked to see if the ticket was a winner.
You cashed in the ticket.

You had a great many 'moments' of 'weakness', it seems.

Quote:
She was so conflicted Thursday that she initially told a reporter she had redeemed the winning ticket for somebody else who offered her a share of the prize. But she later acknowledged buying the ticket after learning that such an arrangement would be unlawful. A lottery investigator, she said, also called her to make sure the ticket was hers.
She was so conflicted about doing what she thought was wrong that she... continued doing what was wrong and lied to cover it up.

That's not being 'conflicted' - that's being greedy and deceitful.

Quote:
"I should be happy, but it's causing me grief," she said. "My heart is going so crazy."

Blake, who is married with children, also said she did not have immediate plans for her windfall and hoped to keep working as a nursing assistant, calling it "my joy."

"I live a quiet life, and I try to do things for people," she said.

Conflicted lottery winner feels poorer in spirit - Orlando Sentinel
But apparently not so 'crazy' as to motivate here to just decline to cash in the ticket, or to give away the proceeds.

Personally, I don't but lottery tickets - not because I think it's wrong, but because I can do basic math (and lottery tickets are a form of voluntary taxation for people who are bad at math). And I don't care if this woman buys them.

But, just shut up. Either quietly enjoy your cash, or give it away - but stop with the "Oh, it's such a burden to me to have won all this money!" melodrama.
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Old 01-17-2015, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Lebanon, OH
5,861 posts, read 6,283,513 times
Reputation: 12426
If she uses the money for good then what would be the problem, if gambling is a sin then the Catholics are in a lot of trouble for all of their bingo debauchery.
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Old 01-17-2015, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Somewhere gray and damp, close to the West Coast
12,013 posts, read 2,213,307 times
Reputation: 5087


Just
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Old 01-17-2015, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Western Colorado
11,051 posts, read 12,400,665 times
Reputation: 25945
I'm a Christian and I would have no problem with her giving me all that money.
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Old 01-17-2015, 09:32 AM
 
2,288 posts, read 2,607,283 times
Reputation: 7018
My God would think it's a bigger sin to lie, and she seemed to have no problem with that until she found out that was a crime. She appears to be suffering guilt, maybe for being rich.?? Easy solution, share the wealth with the needy. I'm a little shocked she hasn't said she is. Maybe her guilt is because she has no plans to.
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Old 01-17-2015, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Leaving fabulous Las Vegas, Nevada
3,854 posts, read 6,848,820 times
Reputation: 7311
Some people just enjoy guilt.
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Old 01-17-2015, 12:15 PM
Status: "Pondering the difference between America and AmeriKKKa" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: Dallas, TX
3,958 posts, read 2,090,191 times
Reputation: 3707
Giving money to her church: The only way I can see that this would have even a fighting chance of being legitimate is

(a) the church she attends (or her denomination) does not take a stand against at least frequent gambling.
(b) the Bible itself says nothing specific or strongly implicit against gambling

If (a) is the case, then she should give the money to charity or some other institution where she thinks her money can achieve the maximum suffering reduction for society (or even outright good, to the extent that "good" includes "reducing the bad").

(b) Some Christians will say that she did not practice good stewartship. For light gambling, I can argue both sides of the issue; although for non-professionals I can say the same thing about really high-risk investments (e.g. futures contracts).

Totally aside from these points, there's also the issue about whether a church can legitimately accept the money without endorsing the activity, regardless of whether her church's stance (or lack thereof) about gambling. After all, gambling is well known to be addictive for some people. Yet convenience stores sell alcohol, also quite addictive for many people. Should convenience store owners lose the right to donate to their charity, given that charities should (in principle) not accept money gained directly or indirectly from others' sufferings (in effect, exploiting others who suffer)?

Obviously I can't speak for what this lady should do, so long as she does not use this money to enable harm to come to others. Were I in her place, I think the best (or at least the "least bad") thing to do is to donate money to organizations that prevent and/or treat gambling addiction. I simply cannot think of a better way for a devout Christian to use the funds.
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Old 01-17-2015, 12:52 PM
 
9,905 posts, read 9,276,953 times
Reputation: 8035
The devil made her do it.

Some time ago a guy won the lottery and his church refused the money when he tried to give it to them. I guess it was ill gotten gains.

This lady didn't have to go through all this hoopla she could have quietly given all the money away to homeless shelters, food kitchens, battered/abuse centers, cancer research and on and on. Her church probably could have used the ill gotten gains to reach out in the community.

I think she is just whining because her win was made public and "oh my what will my preacher think of me" and the preacher is just a man, human, like the rest of us.
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Old 01-17-2015, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,505 posts, read 51,230,061 times
Reputation: 24606
I would laugh all the way to my investment broker. Guilt is an emotion I had shot off in a war a long time ago and far, far away.
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Old 01-17-2015, 01:13 PM
 
894 posts, read 836,253 times
Reputation: 2633
Lol, I'm sure a nice donation to the church coffers would make her preacher feel differently....
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