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Old 01-17-2015, 06:54 AM
 
Location: Palmer/Fishhook, Alaska
1,256 posts, read 876,134 times
Reputation: 1895

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasHorseLady View Post
Oh, please, no. What do I think? I think that there will always be a scapegoat, someone to be prejudiced against, someone to try to control, for those portions of the population who absolutely need to make sure that absolutely everyone else lives the way they want them to.

Eventually, the world will be reduced to shades of grey if these folks get their way.

I have allergies. They are MY allergies, not anyone else's, and I don't expect others to live their lives as if they were me or to cater to my preferences Yes, there are some people who overdo the perfume, perhaps because they're so used to it that they can't smell it. That used to be an annoyance, rather than an invitation to control. But there is a whole big area between that and no scent at all, and going to the latter as a response to the former is absolute overkill, at best.

If I see a business that has such a sign, I will not patronize it, and I will tell them why.


Enough is enough.
This about sums it up.

Seems to me if a person is that exceedingly sensitive, rather than push their needs onto the (much) greater population at large, perhaps they'd be better off remaining in the comfort of their own homes.

I've had some really poor experiences with these sorts. I dunno....public spaces are very large, I just don't see how a law rendering the use of fragrance illegal can be even remotely compared to say....second hand smoke, which most people know will have deleterious effects on just about anyone exposed to it for prolonged periods.

I'll take perfume over BO any day lol
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Old 01-17-2015, 07:32 AM
 
Location: I live wherever I am.
1,935 posts, read 3,498,110 times
Reputation: 3217
Quote:
Originally Posted by LoriBee62 View Post
In my lifetime (the next 30 years or so) do you think we will see the fragrance-free movement gain enough momentum to ban this crap from public places, the way most states have gone with cigarette smoking? I'm chemical sensitive and have had dinners, movies, and other excursions ruined because I've been stuck near people (women mostly, sorry but it's true) who are wearing way, WAY too much perfume.

Some offices and public places are beginning to go fragrance-free (signs posted saying you can't wear colognes and perfumes into the building). Now it looks like the media is beginning to publish more about the dangers of chemical fragrances.

Fragrance Is The New Secondhand Smoke

What do you think?
It's possible and I hope it happens. We've been so conditioned to believe that natural human aromas are disgusting that now we believe it wholeheartedly, and that was the ultimate goal of the perfume industry so that people would buy huge quantities of perfume to mask their normal smells.

Strong fragrances give me headaches. I really don't see the point. When you walk in the room, nobody needs to smell a flower garden. Just be a human being. We'd all do well to get back to the point where we didn't find normal human odors offensive. Because we do find them offensive, we use deodorant with aluminum (a neurotoxin) which prevents the body from naturally excreting toxins through the armpits as it is designed to, we use shampoo with weird chemicals in it that destroy our hair, we use fragrances that nauseate many people around us, etc. Let's just be natural humans, shall we?
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Old 01-17-2015, 07:50 AM
 
565 posts, read 469,186 times
Reputation: 686
I have asthma and allergies. When people use to smoke in a restaurant I had to leave I couldn't breathe. I couldn't just move to a different section. If someone is wearing too much perfume I can choose not to sit near them. Obviously if it was a coworker I would talk to them . Most times people don't realize their cologne/perfume is overwhelming they have gotten use to the fragrance. I use an air cleaner near my desk and it will shift to higher gear when it picks up a smell. I love it and it makes my breathing easier!
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Old 01-17-2015, 07:59 AM
 
Location: South Carolina
13,124 posts, read 17,674,374 times
Reputation: 22501
Quote:
Originally Posted by cp102 View Post
I have asthma and allergies. When people use to smoke in a restaurant I had to leave I couldn't breathe. I couldn't just move to a different section. If someone is wearing too much perfume I can choose not to sit near them. Obviously if it was a coworker I would talk to them . Most times people don't realize their cologne/perfume is overwhelming they have gotten use to the fragrance. I use an air cleaner near my desk and it will shift to higher gear when it picks up a smell. I love it and it makes my breathing easier!

this is a common sense approach to the problem thank you ^^^^ One of my co workers was constantly using Lysol spray for her office and it would wave over to my office and I was like ugh ...so finally I went and got an air cleaner and filter product for my office and it sat really nice on my desk and made life so much easier for me and the rest of the office ..common sense usually trumphs problems
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Old 01-17-2015, 08:14 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
19,889 posts, read 36,422,016 times
Reputation: 21328
OP, you do realize that the site you linked to is trying to sell you something, right? And that the Environmental Working Group's co-founder was named one of Washington's Top Lobbyists? And that his wife pretty much has made her career in managing election campaigns and environmental interest groups? In other words, the group has a LOT invested in people believing in what they have to sell and they're very good at selling.
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Old 01-17-2015, 08:18 AM
 
5,664 posts, read 2,513,093 times
Reputation: 5117
Perfumes, air freshners and such give me an instant headache and make my toungue tingle.
My body reacts to it.
Always has, is getting worse as I get older.

Natural oils an plant fragerance and air freshner does not do that.


What kills me is when I am roller blading on the path and some chick goes by and leaves a trail of perfume and hairspray. All dolled up to run or bike
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Old 01-17-2015, 08:22 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
19,889 posts, read 36,422,016 times
Reputation: 21328
Quote:
Originally Posted by cp102 View Post
I have asthma and allergies. When people use to smoke in a restaurant I had to leave I couldn't breathe. I couldn't just move to a different section. If someone is wearing too much perfume I can choose not to sit near them. Obviously if it was a coworker I would talk to them . Most times people don't realize their cologne/perfume is overwhelming they have gotten use to the fragrance. I use an air cleaner near my desk and it will shift to higher gear when it picks up a smell. I love it and it makes my breathing easier!
Exactly! You take responsibility for your own problems rather than trying to shift that responsibility to others, and you take a common sense approach to it and find a solution that works for you. Good for you, and thank you for adding a little more common sense to the world!

What kind of air cleaner do you use, if you don't mind my asking?
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Old 01-17-2015, 08:26 AM
 
2,620 posts, read 2,352,142 times
Reputation: 7195
Quote:
Originally Posted by ks5692 View Post
When you ban smoking because it offends you, then smokers should have every right to ban perfume because it offends them. Why not?
Would be interesting to know how many people supporting freedom to wear perfumes were the same ones rallying to ban smokers years ago. I remember when that was happening, seatbelt and helmet laws were also becoming popular. I'd said at the time that we are starting down a slippery slope toward dictating how people live, but no one wanted to hear it. The momentum against smoking was too strong for anyone to care.
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Old 01-17-2015, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
19,889 posts, read 36,422,016 times
Reputation: 21328
Well, I don't smoke, wear precious little perfume, and absolutely abhor bans on smoking (or much of anything, come to that). I have this odd idea that if I encourage the removal of the rights of others in service to my own preferences or sensitivities, that I have just said that it's just fine for someone else to do the same to me and I won't be able to even say a thing about it because I've said it's okay.

I also said, right here on C-D, in a smoking is the devil discussion (these kinds of things do bear all the earmarks of a religion), that as soon as the smokers were controlled that those whose addiction was to dictating the lives of others or to prejudice would find another target, most likely what you chose to eat. "Oh, no!" they cried, "That will never happen, you're wrong!" Two months later bans on trans-fats went into effect in two cities, and the hunt was on. As I said in my original response to your OP, there will always be a new target for that kind of person, because that's as strong an addiction as smoking ever is, perhaps stronger.
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Old 01-17-2015, 08:39 AM
 
2,620 posts, read 2,352,142 times
Reputation: 7195
Quote:
Originally Posted by don1945 View Post
I don't know if it is the type of perfume these ladies wear or the amount they use, but it certainly is unpleasant to be around one of them.
It is the type of perfume. Like everything, manufactuers are looking for cheaper ways to make things, and in the perfume industry (which includes air fresheners, candle scents, soaps and detergents, etc.) that means making them from synthetic chemicals as opposed to the old ways of making them from natural sources. It's been since this change that toxicity and chemical sensitivity started occurring. Curiously, it's also been since the age of mass manufacturing that the rate of children born with autism and peanut allergies has skyrocketed.

Honestly, does no one wonder about any of this, or do you really need to be neck deep in quicksand before you notice you've got a problem?
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