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Old 01-17-2015, 04:37 PM
 
2,620 posts, read 2,348,152 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lenora View Post
"Instead of being medicinal, today’s fragranced products are associated with diabetes, obesity, autism, ADD/ADHD and hormone disruption.."

Today's fragranced products are associated with obesity.

ROFLMAO.
Yes, I kind of wondered where that obesity connection came from too. Maybe that bacon-scented perfume is legit after all.
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Old 01-17-2015, 04:45 PM
 
Location: MID ATLANTIC
7,598 posts, read 17,629,190 times
Reputation: 8083
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasHorseLady View Post
Note the actual source of that particular answer to a question in Scientific American (which quotes a 2010 article, without cites, of the EWG - see what I found about them above - again:

EarthTalk® is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E - The Environmental Magazine

"Roddy Scheer is a Seattle-based journalist and photographer specializing in environmental issues, travel and the outdoors."

Doug Moss

FDA itself on cosmetics ingredients.
The choice of documents to support the OP's POV are blogs or self published, one was a sales site. If scientific studies and or research was desired, more respected material should be presented. Blogs may be peer reviewed, but they do not go through the vetting process and deserve a skeptical eye. Here is a university professor's site with her published research. http://www.drsteinemann.com/obtain_articles.htm They are in two formats, published and pre-pubication. The journals and websites are scientific in nature or science based.

Okay, so there is some data to support the toxicity of your neighbor's perfume. But where do you draw the line? No scented shampoo for everyone? Scent-free hand creams? Two squirt limit? I was working in an office where there was a new hire. We found out real fast why she left here last job. Within two weeks, there were complaints in HR about everyday toiletries. People stopped wearing any scent, but that wasn't good enough. It became completely obsurd. Her welcome was worn out quickly. She didn't stay - we required new hires to come through a temp agency just for this reason. Why should an office be turned upside down for one person? Who's to say what's appropriate? Very slippery slope.........
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Old 01-17-2015, 04:59 PM
eok
 
6,684 posts, read 2,948,971 times
Reputation: 8439
Quote:
Originally Posted by aliasfinn View Post
If they really want to smell good why don't they just keep a hunk of bacon in their pocket?
It has to be cooked to smell good. And still warm. So they have to keep it in a container that won't burn them. But it has to not get their pocket greasy. But the container has to breathe, to let the scent out. If any inventors are reading this, it's your opportunity to invent a gadget people can carry around to smell like freshly cooked bacon. Some restaurants might not allow it, because it might interfere with the smell of what they're serving.
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Old 01-17-2015, 05:03 PM
 
2,620 posts, read 2,348,152 times
Reputation: 7195
Quote:
Originally Posted by SmartMoney View Post
Okay, so there is some data to support the toxicity of your neighbor's perfume. But where do you draw the line?
Thank you for the link. With regard to your question, everything doesn't have to be measured in extremes. One option is to simply disclose what is in the products, so that consumers are aware of what they are spraying on themselves and in their homes. That knowledge alone could lead a lot of consumers toward products that aren't toxic. And when consumer demand leads people toward products scented using natural oils, the problem takes care of itself without the need for bans.

It would be much nicer if the chemicals weren't in the products in the first place. FYI, they weren't prior to around the 80's when companies started manufacturing synthetic fragrances. I was alive then and don't recall total economic failure or a world that reeked of BO. Products were scented. They were simply scented with natural materials that didn't make everyone sick.
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Old 01-17-2015, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
19,884 posts, read 36,400,379 times
Reputation: 21321
Quote:
Originally Posted by lenora View Post
"Instead of being medicinal, today’s fragranced products are associated with diabetes, obesity, autism, ADD/ADHD and hormone disruption.."

Today's fragranced products are associated with obesity.

ROFLMAO.
Yes. They must have had LOTS of synthetic chemicals in the Renaissance!




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Old 01-17-2015, 05:21 PM
 
Location: Somewhere gray and damp, close to the West Coast
11,677 posts, read 2,090,093 times
Reputation: 4960
Lol!! ^^^
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Old 01-17-2015, 05:47 PM
 
4,750 posts, read 3,316,887 times
Reputation: 4919
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ceece View Post
Nope. At some point people need to accept that the world doesn't revolve around them and this isn't enforceable even if you see a sign. All anyone CAN do is talk to people who are obnoxious about things and let them know it's not appropriate in the workplace or in confined areas when you are close to people...like body odor and bad breath.

Most people who wear scents are not obnoxious about it.
If only I could rep this 1000 times...



Quote:
Originally Posted by LoriBee62 View Post
Yes, I kind of wondered where that obesity connection came from too. Maybe that bacon-scented perfume is legit after all.
Maybe this will explain it:

Quote:
Avoiding synthetic fragrances is a fast-and-easy way to lower your exposure to fat-promoting phthalates chemicals.
How Lotions and Shampoos Fuel Childhood Obesity
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Old 01-17-2015, 05:49 PM
 
8,862 posts, read 7,340,095 times
Reputation: 11792
NO! Stop trying to get the government to regulate personal behavior and responsibility. Perfumes & colognes can be nice if used in moderation. The problem with them comes from the ignorant who use far too much. It is up to the people they know to tell them to use less perfume or cologne. The only fragrance I use on a daily basis is what's in my soap, shampoo, and deodorant. For certain occasions I use one spray of cologne on each side of my neck. I've stopped using aftershave lotions and colognes that are heavy with fragrance. I now use an unscented Lubriderm Men's 3-N-1 lotion made for hands and face and is quickly absorbed.

At one time people used so much fragrance due to things like tobacco smoke, body odor from infrequent bathing, and to help cover up the odors from poor sanitation (horse manure during an era in which horses were the main source of transportation and lack of indoor plumbing). Indoor plumbing helped to remove once source of foul odor. Automobiles eventually removed the manure, but replaced the manure smell with the smell of gas, oil, and exhaust smoke. As the technology improved, the smell from exhaust was greatly reduced. Over time, more and more people either quit or never took up smoking. As smoking is removed from more and more places, the odor from people's personal fragrance becomes over powering. In decades past, these fragrances weren't a problem when combined with the amount of tobacco smoke smells all over all buildings. But with all these buildings no longer smelling of tobacco smoke, a little fragrance goes a long way and a lot of fragrance is overpowering.

Another mistake some people make is not realizing how many different fragrances they already are using before they put on perfumes. Body soap, shampoo, and lotions also have fragrance. In decades past, these were overpowered by tobacco smoke. Now they can be noticed when close to the person depending on how long ago these things were used. I use a gender neutral smelling soap & shampoo. Soaps and shampoo made for men all smell like men's cologne and it's smell is just too strong and long lasting for my taste. The gender neutral soaps & shampoos have a softer odor and fades fairly quickly.

Instead of getting the government to dictate, parents need to educate their children on this. Friends, family, and coworkers need to politely inform those who use too much fragrance. As people avoid contact with those who use too much, they'll use less and less.
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Old 01-17-2015, 05:54 PM
 
Location: LA, CA/ In This Time and Place
5,425 posts, read 3,280,484 times
Reputation: 5033
I do agree that too much of that stuff smells terrible and can induce nausea and vomit, but has there been consistent studies that prove that it is overall harmful?

Second hand smoke has been known to be harmful, not the same as perfume/cologne scent.
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Old 01-17-2015, 06:07 PM
 
8,862 posts, read 7,340,095 times
Reputation: 11792
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhureeKeeper View Post
I have a co-worker who has started using a strong scented plug-in in his office. The scent wafts all around the office.
I am going to have to tell him to unplug it as I can't stand it. It burns my sinuses.
I've tried to convince my wife to stop using these because they are a potential fire hazard. However, a place of employment is a different matter. Speak with the boss about the plug in scent device. Penny pinching employers don't like such devices because they are an electricity vampire that doesn't contribute in any way to the company's operation and is a potential liability.

The main reason why odors seem to linger longer inside modern buildings involves the combination of sealed insulated building design and modern HVAC (heating cooling system) design for maximum energy efficiency. These HVAC units are made to take in a certain percentage of outside air and recirculate the rest of the air from the work spaces. This causes odors to linger far longer than older inefficient HVAC systems that had 100% outside air sent into the work spaces and exhaust fans drawing the stale air out from ceiling exhaust vents. Odors were quickly removed using such a system. Also, older building designs were less insulated and had more air leaks through doors, windows, and gaps in the walls. These new HVAC systems have improved the air exchange rates and, if the building owners are willing to spend the money, improve employee safety with the addition of UV lights in the duct after the cooling coils as well as higher quality air filters. They don't need to be HEPA quality, but even a MERV7 or 8 rated filters will improve air quality compared to the traditional polyfiber type filters. Some use a polyfiber pre-filter, pleated air filter, and then a higher quality near HEPA or actual HEPA filter is the ideal system but such levels are usually reserved for hospitals or high tech industry clean rooms.
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