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Old 01-29-2015, 07:41 AM
 
15,414 posts, read 8,739,092 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ForLoveOnly View Post
False. Many law enforcement dogs are pit breeds because they are easy to train, command and very loyal.
False. Few, if any, pit breeds are used in law enforcement. Apprehension dogs tend to be herding dogs (German Shepherds, Malinois, etc.), drug detection dogs tend to be dogs that have great noses (Beagles) or an abundance of energy and play drive (Labs), while search and rescue dogs tend to be dogs bred for that purpose (Bloodhounds).

Please show me where any law enforcement agency uses a pit breed.
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Old 01-29-2015, 07:46 AM
 
15,414 posts, read 8,739,092 times
Reputation: 13786
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHABAZZ310 View Post
So you're telling me you would risk killing someone, injuring someone, being shot yourself, or being arrested because you thought it was a good idea to shot and kill a "viscous" dog in the middle of a park? Not me! If I was at a dog park and another dog attacked my dog, I would just kick the sh** out of the other dog or maybe use a stick or something if the other dog was large...
I believe the shooter tried kicking the dog repeatedly, but it wasn't working. And knowing that his dog could be killed at any moment, he carefully and methodically (as described in the witness accounts) took out the threat. He did not fire wildly, nobody else was at risk, and the threat was dispatched. And yes, I personally would risk being arrested to save my dog. But he wasn't, now, was he?

It's quite obvious that you hate guns and defend aggressive dogs. It's also just as obvious that you have no experience with this type of situation. "Use a large stick"? Seriously?
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Old 01-29-2015, 07:47 AM
Status: "A delicate snowflake with the vote of a wolverine." (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Houston, TX
13,303 posts, read 7,495,637 times
Reputation: 27482
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHABAZZ310 View Post
Dogs are animals and sometimes animals fight each other. It's not worth pulling a gun out and discharging it...
Quote:
Originally Posted by ringwise View Post
Sorry, have to disagree on this. If you have a dog that "sometime fights", you have no business being in a dog park. And if your dog is about to kill my dog, I will do whatever is necessary to keep that from happening.

Nobody was hurt except the viscous dog.
Agreed. If a dog, Pitbull or not, was attacking one of my dogs, the attack was serious, and I had a gun at hand, you bet I would use it to stop the attacking dog. I would not let my dog be gravely injured or killed by another dog attacking her. My deaf Great Dane already has part of her ear bitten off because of a dog attack. That injury alone caused extensive bleeding, a trip to the emergency vet followed by several follow-ups for bandage removal, and now her ear has a scar and permanent notch in it. And you know what kind of dog attacked her? A tiny Chihuahua. He stuck his head through a miniscule hole in our backyard fence. When my Dane saw him and went to investigate, he snapped and bit her ear through the hole, and because she couldn't hear him growling, she didn't know what was coming
Attached Thumbnails
Dog shot and killed at dog park-chihuahua-damage.jpg  
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Old 01-29-2015, 09:28 AM
 
4,721 posts, read 4,303,013 times
Reputation: 8988
Dogs that are aggressive breed should not be at dog parks off of a leash. My mother adopted a pit bull not long ago, she thought it was gentle because that is what the rescue group said. It automatically bonded with my mom, and she loved it. However, when it met one of the family dogs it went for the throat. My mom was not strong enough to pull if off, it was on a leash thank God. My dad had to grab the leash and drag it away. Mom gave the dog back to the rescue group. They advertised the dog again as friendly and claimed it had been returned because it was too playful. Trying to rip the throat out of another dog is not playing.
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Old 01-29-2015, 11:09 AM
 
3,493 posts, read 4,728,080 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pennyone View Post
This is one among hundreds of reasons why no one should be using dog parks. Most people are either too ignorant, or incapable of controlling their dogs. The play is just a half beat away from mayhem as different breeds of dogs interact and things can go bad really quickly.

The man who shot the pitbull may feel genuinely threatened for his dog, but this begs the question...why did he bring his own dog to a dog park knowing full well that aggressive dogs may be there? To me, this is a tragic case of stupid on stupid killing.
I'm all for gun rights, but no guns in the dog park. There is no reason to carry a gun into the dog park. Everyone around the armed person has a reasonable right to feel threatened and react with lethal force. Unfortunately, they aren't armed, so there is just one mad gunman out there that may legitimately feel scared that he will be punished for his evil deeds.

A terrible person that never should have had a permit. May he rot in jail.
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Old 01-29-2015, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Chicago area
13,144 posts, read 7,256,350 times
Reputation: 50207
It's horribly sad and unfortunate that a two year old dog with a long life ahead of it was destroyed. However, there just aren't enough facts in the article to determine what really happened. My poor Howie was attacked by larger dogs when he was a puppy. It looked vicious but in reality he wasn't really hurt. Dogs have a way of taking care of these altercations better then humans do and if the poor dog was shot over just a doggie argument then the shooter needs to be charged with animal cruelty. If the dog did indeed viciously attack his dog then he did the right thing. Who wouldn't protect their dog in the same situation? Getting in the middle of fighting dogs is dangerous but there is a way to separate them by getting behind them and pulling them away with their back legs. I love dog parks and our Yorkie had his first experience last summer with a rather large wolf looking thing. He ran around in circles in the parking lot yelping even though the dog showed no aggression towards him. It was hysterical but I do worry about him getting hurt. I will take them both to the dog beach next summer in Chicago. I could stay there all day.
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Old 01-29-2015, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,617 posts, read 26,294,002 times
Reputation: 26706
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vector1 View Post
Really, "Out of the Pits" is your source?

Regardless, it along with the other linked site showed two individual pitbulls, not a bunch of them. Nor do two constitute what the poster claimed as many that are in LE.
You said you never heard of a pitbull being used by law enforcement. Now you have.

There are some in search and rescue, too.

Probably would be more if the thought of one did not induce fear and loathing in so many people.
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Old 01-29-2015, 05:25 PM
 
Location: Los Awesome, CA
8,520 posts, read 4,771,588 times
Reputation: 3303
Quote:
Originally Posted by ringwise View Post
I believe the shooter tried kicking the dog repeatedly, but it wasn't working. And knowing that his dog could be killed at any moment, he carefully and methodically (as described in the witness accounts) took out the threat. He did not fire wildly, nobody else was at risk, and the threat was dispatched. And yes, I personally would risk being arrested to save my dog. But he wasn't, now, was he?

It's quite obvious that you hate guns and defend aggressive dogs. It's also just as obvious that you have no experience with this type of situation. "Use a large stick"? Seriously?
Obvious to who? I own many guns and I go shooting quite often. While in Iraq I was actually part of a detail that went around shooting stray dogs on the FOB because we were overran by them. I've personally seen bullets travel through an dog and ricochet. Have you?
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Old 01-29-2015, 07:27 PM
 
Location: Kansas
19,189 posts, read 14,157,925 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trishguard View Post
I find it funny that this updated story lists the shooters weight and height. Do they expect him to wrestle with the dog or something? Clearly a biased article. The fact that the owners of Diesel did nothing to extricate their dog from the situation tells me all I need to know about what kind of owners they were. Telling someone who is clearly having an issue with "your" dog to just grab it's collar?
I once had a dog come toward us aggressively when we were on a walk and the owner told me to hit him in the butt with the stick I was carrying. That way, she didn't have to leave the porch because the dog wouldn't respond.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dblackga View Post
So many things going wrong in this scenario:

1. The man (shooter) and his wife came in the dog park and his wife kept her dog on a leash. Bringing a leashed dog into an area that is specifically designated as "off leash" put that dog at a disadvantage in terms of socializing and using the park in the manner in which it was meant to be used. If you don't trust your dog in an off-leash dog park -- DON'T GO TO THE PARK. You can walk ANYWHERE. Although it appears the leashed dog wasn't involved, it does indicate a certain degree of unfamiliarity with the customes of an off-leash park.

2. The man (shooter) and his wife should have left when they felt threatened by Diesel. Was Diesel a "bully"? Were other dogs afraid of him? Had he been terrorizing the park? Or was this just one of those weird reactions some dogs have to some other dog -- they take an "instant dislike" to another dog, through some series of signals that most humans don't see? Usually, fights between dogs at a dog park are between young male dogs (less than two years) who are undersocialized -- but of course, there are exceptions.

3. Neither owner seemed to be very savvy when it comes to dog park etiquette and managing dog behavior. Most dog owners know that it's very dangerous to wade into the middle of a dog fight. "Grab his collar!" Really?! Uh -- no, not unless you want to be bitten. Here's some recommendations from Animal Plant on how to break up a dog fight: Dog Park Drama: What's the Safest Way to Break Up a Dog Fight - The Daily Treat: Animal Planet All dog owners should know how to make a quick "noose" out of their leash to slip over a dogs head and pull taut.

I take my dogs to the dog park two or three times a week. 98% of the time, it's a pleasant hour -- a nice walk for me, the dogs joyously racing around, chasing each other, sniffing new smells, meeting new people barking at squirrels. But occasionally, they are out of sorts -- maybe they are tired, maybe they don't feel good -- and every dog they meet irritates them. Those are the visits that are cut short, and we just go for a walk outside the park. And even more rarely, there's another dog that wants to play King For A Day and decdes to "pick" on my dog. Usually the owner controls them. If not, I figure, "eh, some other time" and just leave. It's supposed to be fun way to exercise -- when it stops being fun, it's time to leave.

This whole story is just one of ignorance on top of stupidity. I think the man SHOULD be charged. And certainly banned from the dog park.
Please do not listen to the advice being given here about breaking up a dog fight, which I don't think this incident was in the first place. We had two pitbulls come after our dogs when we were walking. I had a stun gun which I could not get close enough to do anything other than momentarily redirect them from the necks of my dogs. Again and again they would try to get to the neck of my dog and I was risking being attacked but it appeared they were young and only dog aggressive. The owners were watching from their yard. They allow open carry here and had I had a gun, I would have shot both dogs. These dogs were insane with aggression. My dogs never, ever showed any aggressiveness toward the dogs assaulting them. My dogs are larger, one is 85 lbs and the other 65 lbs. Those dogs just continued and continued. Luckily, I have both dogs on pinch collars and as the dogs bite at those, that helped to slow down the incident until one of the girls came to the street and the dogs retreated to their yards. These dogs were intent on trying to kill my dogs. They are no longer in the neighborhood. We have a lot of pitbulls here, the dog of preference for illegals, and lots of dog bites, an unusually high number. Most people are too ignorant to understand the body language of dogs. We had a standoff with a boxer also, he wanted to make friends according to the neighbor who was in violation of the lease law. This boxer did not want to make friends and I had the animal control officer visit with him and I haven't seen the dog since.

Fighting dogs were selectively bred to fight, hunting dogs to hunt, herding dogs to herd, etc. Believing that you can change the very nature, at the core of the dog not to do this, seriously ignorant. Breeds that are aggressive toward other dogs don't belong in a dog park. I think "dog parks" are probably the most ignorant idea that people ever had since it just begs for problems.
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Old 01-29-2015, 07:28 PM
 
Location: NW Nevada
13,341 posts, read 10,965,339 times
Reputation: 12291
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHABAZZ310 View Post
Obvious to who? I own many guns and I go shooting quite often. While in Iraq I was actually part of a detail that went around shooting stray dogs on the FOB because we were overran by them. I've personally seen bullets travel through an dog and ricochet. Have you?
Yes. Though the question wasn't actually directed at me. Ball ammunition , from a rifle, always over penetrates. Its designed to. It would take an EXTTEMELY powerful handgun to do the same thing, and defensive ammunition is engineered to not over penetrate. Though possible, it is extremely unlikely , that a bullet, fired from a defensive type handgun using defensive type ammo, would zip through a heavily muscles and boned animal and keep on going. Even at PBR.

I've seen a lot of I'll wishes, directed at the guy who shot the dog, here. Seems a lot of people think it wouldn't have been justifiable , under any circumstances. Personally, I would never try and grab hold of a dog such as this one was, nor would I be to game to take him on with a stick, unless the "stick" was a baseball bat. Even then, I don't think there are many people who could stop a dog like that with one swing, unless they got really lucky. More likely is the batter's gonna get bit.
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