U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Current Events
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 02-09-2015, 08:15 AM
 
2,442 posts, read 1,807,673 times
Reputation: 4644

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by SoCalSun View Post
1) The measles virus.
2) Measles "vaccinations".
3) Immigration of infected persons or disease carriers.

It has been scientifically and historically proven that areas which are highly vaccinated have more cases of the measles than less or non-vaccinated places.

Moreover, it's good to get the measles. Measles survivors have been shows to have a stronger immune system and be immune to things like breast cancer.
I'm sorry, I know you're an avid student of history (the "holocaust fraud") and of society ( the "sodomite agenda"), but vaccines are supported with hard data, which is irrefutable.

So no, what as been shown to be true is that measles cases are directly correlated to vaccination, inversely. More vax, fewer measles. In fact there was a huge breakthrough between 2000-2013 when they did a massive vaccination blitz which resulted in a 75% drop in fatalities. It was a triumph of modern medicine. Now they're down to only 145,000 children a year dying of measles! (before 2000 500,000 children died per year from measles).

If measles made you immune to breast cancer, then why did breast cancer exist before 1990? (Vaccine introduced mid 60s, those women turning 30 in the mid 90s.

 
Old 02-09-2015, 08:15 AM
 
38,675 posts, read 15,496,725 times
Reputation: 17021
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
The post said vaccinations are correlated with measles. Not the same thing, though he was probably trying to imply causation as well.
I missed that, but I do believe, like you, that would be the intent of the statement. In any case, complete eradication would be considered a complete discontinuity of that particular causation theory. i.e. it fails.
 
Old 02-09-2015, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,053 posts, read 99,058,791 times
Reputation: 31544
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mathguy View Post
You make some big claims for someone not providing any sources.....

I can only assume you read it off a blog or maybe a website article while shopping for healing crystals?
The thing is, if you say it's been scientifically proven, you don't have to provide a link!
 
Old 02-09-2015, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,053 posts, read 99,058,791 times
Reputation: 31544
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jo48 View Post
http://www.stripes.com/news/europe/g...han-the-one-in-

As with the US outbreaks, their's has also mostly affected adults. Perhaps that MMR childhood vaccination wears off after so many years. According to this article, the German people are not as concerned with it as Americans are.
We don't have all the stats on all the patients yet, so it's best not to jump to conclusions. Anyone over 58, e.g. grandparents, is considered immune by natural immunity. So I guess their "natural immunity" failed them.

I'm of German ancestry myself, but I'll say, the Germans have some funny ideas about health, and frankly, I don't care what their "feelings" about this are.
 
Old 02-09-2015, 09:21 AM
 
Location: Fishers, IN
3,862 posts, read 4,281,224 times
Reputation: 3965
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissTerri View Post
So your risk as a vaccinated person is 1% yet you are so scared of measles that you feel the need to force other people to get the vaccine due to the miniscule possibility that you may be a tiny bit less likely to contract measles?

I am not afraid of measles or the measles vaccine but I am very afraid of people like you and Suzy who are calling for forced vaccinations. Actually, I'm disgusted by it.
I'm not worried about getting it. I'm worried about my baby that is too young to get the vaccine. Dr. Sanjay Gupta said it best, "It's not just because I love my kids that I vaccinated them - it's because I love your kids as well."

What you're saying is like saying "I should be able to choose to go 70 mph, even when the speed limit is 30 mph, because I'm not afraid of the risk I pose to myself or my passengers" though it completely ignores the risk it poses to other people around you.

Last edited by ischyros; 02-09-2015 at 09:29 AM..
 
Old 02-09-2015, 09:21 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,053 posts, read 99,058,791 times
Reputation: 31544
Just read my local paper. They listed the schools in my district with the lowest immunization rates. A couple of non-surprises, several small mountain schools where the parents are more "alternative"; an arts school; and strangely, several middle schools in Boulder.

Vaccination rates vary by school in Boulder, St. Vrain, worrying health officials - Boulder Daily Camera
 
Old 02-09-2015, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,053 posts, read 99,058,791 times
Reputation: 31544
Just one more post before someone else responds. I was on Facebook, looking at my "Immunize Colorado" page. They posted this story, which also shows a measles quarantine sign, for those of you who don't believe they ever existed. I just noticed the article does have some errors about the timing of the introduction of the measles vaccines. Both killed and live measles vaccines were introduced in 1963. The killed vaccine was taken off the market in 1968.

Should adults be vaccinated for measles? | NJ.com (Article with picture)
http://www.immunize.org/askexperts/experts_mmr.asp
 
Old 02-09-2015, 09:31 AM
 
685 posts, read 533,627 times
Reputation: 1003
Quote:
Originally Posted by PoppySead View Post
I agree with everyone, no conspiracy we get Measles outbreaks in America every year, they make good headlines. Even if we acheived a 100% vaccination rate for children here we would still get outbreaks. We have a high rate already of children who are vaccinated but adults are a different story. Most of this hype gets centered around parents who don't vax their kids, but that really isn't the problem, that's a very small part of the population who is subject to Measles. Adults haven't gotten boosters and travel to other countries and bring it back. Adults come here with Measles and bring it in, just like they did with Ebola. We don't require adults vax's for Measles when traveling or maybe the outbreaks would be smaller.

I get real sick of hearing these parents and these kids who don't vax are the cause of outbreaks. They are only involved, we would still have small outbreaks yearly if all kids were vaccinated. Babies would still get it because they are to young for their vax. It takes a herd, and the real problem is the adults in our herd who aren't immune, not the kids. Adults are mostly responsible for traveling abroad and bringing back illness, not 6, 7 and 8 year old.

In 2000 America was stated to be eliminated from our country. It's other countries where it is not eliminated that is the problem. Why people waste time and hatred on blaming the very few parents that don't vax here I have no idea. It's a waste of time, and just causes conflict. It's no mystery in America why we get outbreaks yearly, totally expected. We follow them yearly. Even if every child had a vaccine we would still get these outbreaks.
Measles outbreaks will stop when we have eliminated it from all other countries.

Measles | Frequently Asked Questions about Measles in U.S. | CDC
I agree with you mostly. You said, "Measles outbreaks will stop when we have eliminated it from all other countries." But you also said earlier, "Adults are mostly responsible for traveling abroad and bringing back illness, not 6, 7 and 8 year old." "in America why we get outbreaks yearly, totally expected."

Vaccinating kids here rather than nature immunizing them naturally stops the natural flow of life. So future kids who aren't vaccinated when exposed stand a higher-risk of getting it. It makes news when there's nothing more important going on. (Which is annoying because it means Washington isn't doing their job.)
 
Old 02-09-2015, 09:34 AM
 
2,442 posts, read 1,807,673 times
Reputation: 4644
Quote:
Originally Posted by FallsAngel View Post
We don't have all the stats on all the patients yet, so it's best not to jump to conclusions. Anyone over 58, e.g. grandparents, is considered immune by natural immunity. So I guess their "natural immunity" failed them.

I'm of German ancestry myself, but I'll say, the Germans have some funny ideas about health, and frankly, I don't care what their "feelings" about this are.
The reason they're not horrified is that they've had bigger outbreaks recently. By comparison it's not so bad.

Apparently they have the same problem the US does and Australia did, adults who were vaxxed before they realised that only one vax doesn't make enough people immune. Measles boosters aren't for waning immunity, they're because some proportion of people don't respond to each shot. So if 90% of people seroconvert each time they're vaccinated, then one vax will leave 90% immune, two will leave 99% immune and the remainder don't matter because they'll be randomly distributed and surrounded by a buffer of immune people. It's when non-immune people cluster at Waldorf schools and the like that they can pass the infection amongst themselves.


Quote:
But German experts say that one third of all vaccinated German children either lack a sufficient immunisation (which usually requires a second dose), or are vaccinated too late. In fact, most of those who caught the virus were adults whereas official statistics only take into account children. Similar patterns have been observed in California, where the majority of those who caught the virus were adults as well. Particularly those born between 1970 and 1990 might have missed vaccination doses, due to a lack of stringent recommendations by public health officials at that time. The course of the disease is particularly serious for adults, although children are usually more likely to get infected.

The reasons for the lack of vaccinations in Germany are similar to those often mentioned in the United States: In both countries, measles seemed to have been "eliminated," and subsequently people started to "relax" about immunisation. Contrary to developing countries, where the terrifying repercussions of measles outbreaks are still too visible to ignore, many in the US or Germany have never been confronted with the disease. This makes them more susceptible for the ongoing debates about the safety of vaccinations that have prevented some parents from becoming vaccinated or ensuring that their children receive the necessary doses.

Local authorities in Germany first noticed a surge in infections last October among asylum seekers from Serbia as well as Bosnia and Herzegovina. One potential reason for the increase in cases could be the fact that the Yugoslav civil war in the 1990s interrupted vaccination programs in the areas from where the refugees have now fled. Overall, nearly all of those who got infected said they had not been vaccinated.
 
Old 02-09-2015, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,053 posts, read 99,058,791 times
Reputation: 31544
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeaceOut001 View Post
I agree with you mostly. You said, "Measles outbreaks will stop when we have eliminated it from all other countries." But you also said earlier, "Adults are mostly responsible for traveling abroad and bringing back illness, not 6, 7 and 8 year old." "in America why we get outbreaks yearly, totally expected."

Vaccinating kids here rather than nature immunizing them naturally stops the natural flow of life. So future kids who aren't vaccinated when exposed stand a higher-risk of getting it. It makes news when there's nothing more important going on. (Which is annoying because it means Washington isn't doing their job.)
The "natural flow of life" can kill you, or make you blind, deaf, or mentally retarded. Now ten anti-vaxers will come on to tell us how few deaths there are to measles, but 30% of all measles cases have complications. I have a mild hearing loss, which is thought to be either from measles or mumps. You also don't seem to understand how immunity works. You don't pass on immunity. Everyone has to make their own. Newborns get a certain amount of passive immunity from their moms, whether vaccinated or naturally immune, and a marginal amount of passive immunity from breast feeding, but those antibodies wear off quickly. You have to make your own antibodies to be permanently immune.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Current Events
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top