U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Current Events
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 02-07-2015, 01:47 PM
 
1,807 posts, read 1,130,326 times
Reputation: 2401

Advertisements

illegal immigration of all those children a few months back. In other words, Obama!

 
Old 02-07-2015, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
23,263 posts, read 28,068,309 times
Reputation: 28701
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken S. View Post
Then outbreaks should originate at places like Disneyland on a regular basis. Time will tell how it was really introduced, but I think many of us are rightfully skeptical about "official" pronouncements by the "experts" and government.
If we continue to have declining vaccination rates, then we will see such outbreaks.

Ind. Measles Outbreak, Linked to Super Bowl, Raises Vaccination Concerns

"The crowds and teams may have long departed Indiana after Super Bowl XLVI, but something else has lingered: an outbreak of measles.

Two days before the big game, two people infected with the virus visited the Super Bowl Village together and made stops at a coffee shop, a restaurant and the Indianapolis Colts’ merchandise store in Lucas Oil Stadium.

State health officials confirmed 13 confirmed cases of measles within two neighboring counties in central Indiana last week. According to Dr. Gregory Larkin, the state’s health commissioner, those cases were confined to families in the same social group. A 14th case was diagnosed Friday in one of the same counties as the previous cases."

Measles outbreak after Super Bowl ignites vaccine debate - On Parenting - The Washington Post

"In fact, the reason there was an outbreak at all was apparently because of the small but persistent group of people who refuse to vaccinate their children. According to the official quoted by PBS, 13 of those who have been diagnosed with measles in Indiana have said they had previously declined the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine."

Quote:
Actually given how contagious measels is said to be, the allegedly significant proportion of the population that is under- or unvaccinated, and our society's generally unrestricted and ease of mobility, continued increase should be the case.
It will be.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chronic65 View Post
illegal immigration of all those children a few months back. In other words, Obama!
Children in the countries to the south of us are vaccinated - some countries have higher vaccination rates than the US. You cannot blame this outbreak on those children. Two cases in Mexico were imported to that country from the US.

Last edited by suzy_q2010; 02-07-2015 at 02:08 PM..
 
Old 02-07-2015, 01:58 PM
 
7,022 posts, read 5,976,654 times
Reputation: 6980
What's behind the current measles outbreak? Perhaps the thousands of illegals Obama has allowed to swamp this country might have something to do with it?

Maybe it's those crunchy, no-chemical/all-natural lifestyle, hippie liberal parents who are to blame?

Maybe the fact that Europe's immunization rates are worse than the US's, and the CDC says the Disney measles outbreak came from overseas, might have something to do with it?

If we don't already the US should require that foreign visitors be properly inoculated before entering the states.
 
Old 02-07-2015, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Hyrule
8,401 posts, read 9,857,589 times
Reputation: 7441
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
It is rare for a measles outbreak in the US to be started by a vaccinated person. Where the index case has been identified it is almost always an unvaccinated person. Outbreaks happen where there are clusters of unvaccinated people. We will always have the infants, those with medical contraindications to vaccination, and those who do not get protection from the vaccine, but those people do not all live in the same towns or go to the same schools and churches.
"The external expert panel concluded that the elimination of endemic measles, rubella, and CRS from the United States was sustained through 2011. However, international importation continues, and health care providers should suspect measles or rubella in patients with febrile rash illness, especially when associated with international travel or international visitors, and should report suspected cases to the local health department.

Measles is a highly transmissible disease that resulted in an estimated 2.6 million worldwide deaths annually before measles vaccination became widespread in the 1980s. Global eradication of measles, defined as worldwide interruption of transmission,1 is a desirable goal. A recent World Health Organization (WHO) panel concluded that measles can and should be eradicated.2 The panel stressed that measles eradication efforts should be used to accelerate rubella and congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) control. Globally, rubella is a leading cause of preventable congenital defects with more than 110 000 infants born with CRS in 2008.3 All 6 WHO regions have measles elimination targets. Four WHO regions have set rubella control or elimination targets.4 Elimination is defined as the absence of endemic disease transmission (ie, a chain of transmission that is continuous for ≥12 months) in a defined geographical area.1 Elimination does not imply zero cases because some cases will continue to occur owing to international importation and limited local transmission. The WHO World Health Assembly recommended proceeding to the global eradication of measles, if measurable progress toward the regional measles elimination goals can be achieved.5 The Pan American Health Organization coordinated the measles, rubella, and CRS elimination efforts within the Region of the Americas.6- 8 In 2011, the Pan American Health Organization requested each member country to submit a national report to verify the elimination of measles, rubella, and CRS from the Western hemisphere.

The United States is the most populous country to have documented elimination of endemic measles, rubella, and CRS. The elimination of measles was verified in 2000, and the elimination of rubella and CRS was verified in 2004 by external expert panels convened by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).9- 12 To assess whether the elimination of measles, rubella, and CRS has been sustained, the CDC convened another expert panel in December 2011 to review and discuss data compiled on measles, rubella, and CRS epidemiology, molecular epidemiology, surveillance adequacy, and population immunity. The panel concluded that the elimination of measles, rubella, and CRS from the United States was sustained through 2011.13 This article summarizes the data (updated to include final 2011 case reports) and conclusions of the US national report on measles, rubella, and CRS elimination submitted to the Pan American Health Organization14 and highlights the US experience with sustained elimination of endemic measles, rubella, and CRS."
http://archpedi.jamanetwork.com/arti...cleid=1787786/

Measles vaccination levels among 2-year-old children increased from 70% in 1990 to 91% in 1997.

Since 1993, fewer than 500 cases have been reported annually, and fewer than 200 cases per year have been reported since 1997. A record low annual total of 37 cases was reported in 2004. Available epidemiologic and virologic data indicate that measles transmission in the United States has been interrupted. The majority of cases are now imported from other countries or linked to imported cases. Most imported cases originate in Asia and Europe and occur both among U.S. citizens traveling abroad and persons visiting the United States from other countries. An aggressive measles vaccination program by the Pan American Health Organization has resulted in record low measles incidence in Latin America and the Caribbean, and the interruption of indigenous measles transmission in the Americas. Measles elimination from the Americas was achieved in 2002 and has been sustained since then, with only imported and importation-related measles cases occurring in the region.

Since the mid-1990s, no age group has predominated among reported cases of measles. Relative to earlier decades, an increased proportion of cases now occur among adults. In 1973, persons 20 years of age and older accounted for only about 3% of cases. In 1994, adults accounted for 24% of cases, and in 2001, for 48% of all reported cases.

The size and makeup of measles outbreaks has changed since the 1980s. Prior to 1989, the majority of outbreaks occurred among middle, high school and college student populations. As many as 95% of persons infected during these outbreaks had received one prior dose of measles vaccine. A second dose of measles vaccine was recommended for school-aged children in 1989, and all states now require two doses of measles vaccine for school-aged children. As a result, measles outbreaks in school settings are now uncommon.

In 2008 a total of 140 measles cases was reported, the largest annual total since 1996. Eighty nine percent of these cases were imported from or associated with importations from other countries, particularly countries in Europe where several outbreaks are ongoing. Persons younger than 20 years of age accounted for 76% of the cases; 91% were in persons who were unvaccinated (most because of personal or religious beliefs) or of unknown vaccination status. The increase in the number of cases of measles in 2008 was not a result of a greater number of imported measles cases. It was the result of more measles transmission after the virus was imported. The importation-associated cases occurred largely among school-aged children who were eligible for vaccination but whose parents chose not to have them vaccinated. Many of these children were home-schooled and not subject to school entry vaccination requirements.

Like I stated in the above post, people who don't vaccinate, including anti vax families are involved, but not always the cause. My point, it's the whole picture, not a select group. Yes, childhood vaccines will limit the number of cases during outbreak, but it will not stop outbreaks. To stop outbreaks we would have to eradicate Measles from the world. Travel restrictions, adult boosters and childhood vaccination all play equal roles. Stop singling out anti vax families. That's only a small part of the equation. If you actually care about eliminating disease, address the whole picture. If you just care about starting a "hate" campaign on anti vaxers in America, well then by all means, continue.
When vaccinated people do get measles, they tend to have milder disease, shed less virus, and are less likely to give it to others.


How do we eliminate measles in other countries without vaccinating people? Do we somehow make them vaccinate so that people in the US do not have to? We are working on it, we are always working on it. It will take time, just like everything else. Plus, we travel to places that have Measles, and travel spreads disease.

I believe we should require international travelers to be vaccinated or show immunity to measles. People could decide whether they wanted to not vaccinate and stay home or vaccinate and travel.
This would help. We are doing a pretty good job with childhood vaccines, some states up to 98% vax rate. But, we aren't doing such a great job with adults, nor are we doing a great job with travelers. We can be proactive in all areas with information on the benefits. Already on this thread a few adults thought about it. I myself just got a Measles booster last year during my kids visit to the doctor for his. It will all help.


The adults who vaccinate their children tend to vaccinate themselves. Some adults have just been lazy about keeping up to date, and as this thread shows, some are deciding, in view of the current outbreak, to talk with their doctors. As far as measles is concerned, most adults are still protected by their childhood vaccines, which is why measles boosters are not routine for adults.
Where is your science behind this? Do you have stats showing this to be true? Personally, I have been the only parent of school age children I know out of my childs group who got a booster. I'd like to see that information.



In outbreaks where the person starting the outbreak can be identified, the index case is almost universally unvaccinated.
Well, yes, I think anyone with Measles coming to our country with it would obviously be unvaccinated. Doesn't mean a small amount of vaccinated individuals can't get it and spread it to others though. Just like unvaccinated can. It's good to check and see if you still have immunity as an adult. Or, just make sure and get another booster, it won't hurt you to get another one and costs less. Choice is yours.



The number of cases in an outbreak will depend on the population into which it is introduced. If that population is largely unvaccinated, there will be more cases. That is what happened at Disneyland: one outbreak, a large number of cases.

If the initial case has contact with mostly vaccinated people, the outbreak will be small. If the initial case infects people who have contact with many unvaccinated people, the outbreak will be larger.


Common sence, hence not just children should address their immunity but adults as well. We should also address our travel policies for the unvaccinated entering our country. Of course non vaccinated children are involved, and will spread disease if infected but they are only part of the problem and they will not prevent future outbreaks only help to infect fewer people. Remember, children under the age of two are still susceptible.
 
Old 02-07-2015, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
23,263 posts, read 28,068,309 times
Reputation: 28701
Quote:
Originally Posted by renault View Post
What's behind the current measles outbreak? Perhaps the thousands of illegals Obama has allowed to swamp this country.
No. See my post above. Other countries do vaccinate, some doing a better job than the US.

Quote:
Maybe it's those crunchy, no-chemical/all-natural lifestyle, hippie liberal parents who are to blame?
Anti-vax people are of all political persuasions.

Quote:
Maybe the fact that Europe's immunization rates are worse than the US's, and the CDC says the Disney measles outbreak came from overseas, might have something to do with it?

If we don't already the US should require that foreign visitors be properly inoculated before entering the states.
Measles can be imported from anywhere that measles is endemic. The strains in outbreaks the last two years have been linked to the Philippines.

I agree that we should require travelers to be vaccinated, including American citizens, though citizens could choose quarantine on return if they wished.
 
Old 02-07-2015, 02:22 PM
 
Location: Hyrule
8,401 posts, read 9,857,589 times
Reputation: 7441
Quote:
Originally Posted by renault View Post
What's behind the current measles outbreak? Perhaps the thousands of illegals Obama has allowed to swamp this country might have something to do with it?

Maybe it's those crunchy, no-chemical/all-natural lifestyle, hippie liberal parents who are to blame?

Maybe the fact that Europe's immunization rates are worse than the US's, and the CDC says the Disney measles outbreak came from overseas, might have something to do with it?

If we don't already the US should require that foreign visitors be properly inoculated before entering the states.
Yep, and it's not just things we can vax against. Undocumented Immigrants bringing diseases across border? - ABC15 Arizona
Children crossing border illegally: A possible public health crisis from detention centers.

Of course other places will always bring in unwanted illness. Just look at the Ebola case in TX. Legal travel and illegal immigration will most always be a point of entry.
 
Old 02-07-2015, 02:36 PM
 
1,385 posts, read 1,200,660 times
Reputation: 1707
How much has it declined since 2001? If it was declining all this time and this is such a problem then why were measles cases so uncommon? I guess it was just a fluke that there were so many unvaccinated people people at Disneyland who came into proximity of someone who was spreading it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
If we continue to have declining vaccination rates, then we will see such outbreaks.

Ind. Measles Outbreak, Linked to Super Bowl, Raises Vaccination Concerns

"The crowds and teams may have long departed Indiana after Super Bowl XLVI, but something else has lingered: an outbreak of measles.

Two days before the big game, two people infected with the virus visited the Super Bowl Village together and made stops at a coffee shop, a restaurant and the Indianapolis Colts’ merchandise store in Lucas Oil Stadium.

State health officials confirmed 13 confirmed cases of measles within two neighboring counties in central Indiana last week. According to Dr. Gregory Larkin, the state’s health commissioner, those cases were confined to families in the same social group. A 14th case was diagnosed Friday in one of the same counties as the previous cases."

Measles outbreak after Super Bowl ignites vaccine debate - On Parenting - The Washington Post

"In fact, the reason there was an outbreak at all was apparently because of the small but persistent group of people who refuse to vaccinate their children. According to the official quoted by PBS, 13 of those who have been diagnosed with measles in Indiana have said they had previously declined the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine."
 
Old 02-07-2015, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
23,263 posts, read 28,068,309 times
Reputation: 28701
Quote:
Originally Posted by PoppySead View Post
The increase in the number of cases of measles in 2008 was not a result of a greater number of imported measles cases. It was the result of more measles transmission after the virus was imported. The importation-associated cases occurred largely among school-aged children who were eligible for vaccination but whose parents chose not to have them vaccinated. Many of these children were home-schooled and not subject to school entry vaccination requirements.

Like I stated in the above post, people who don't vaccinate, including anti vax families are involved, but not always the cause. My point, it's the whole picture, not a select group. Yes, childhood vaccines will limit the number of cases during outbreak, but it will not stop outbreaks. To stop outbreaks we would have to eradicate Measles from the world. Travel restrictions, adult boosters and childhood vaccination all play equal roles. Stop singling out anti vax families. That's only a small part of the equation. If you actually care about eliminating disease, address the whole picture. If you just care about starting a "hate" campaign on anti vaxers in America, well then by all means, continue.
Your own post contradicts itself. The fact is that once measles is imported, it predominantly spreads in unvaccinated populations. That is a fact, and please do not tell me that stating that fact is an attempt to start a "hate campaign."

Travel restrictions, adult boosters, and child vaccination do not play equal roles. We do not currently even have travel restrictions. If we did, it would virtually eliminate importation of measles. Most adults are already immune. However, what we are seeing is unimmunized children who are maturing into unimmunized adults. That puts the focus right back on childhood vaccination.

Quote:
The adults who vaccinate their children tend to vaccinate themselves. Some adults have just been lazy about keeping up to date, and as this thread shows, some are deciding, in view of the current outbreak, to talk with their doctors. As far as measles is concerned, most adults are still protected by their childhood vaccines, which is why measles boosters are not routine for adults.

Where is your science behind this? Do you have stats showing this to be true? Personally, I have been the only parent of school age children I know out of my childs group who got a booster. I'd like to see that information.
Remember that there is no recommendation for routine measles boosters in adults, because the vaccine is so effective. Therefore, an adult would be up to date with no measles booster.

The parents I know, all of whom vaccinate, do vaccinate themselves. Most are in an age group where really all they need is the Tdap, and most are taking it. We grandparents are doing it, too.

Overall, adults are probably undervaccinated, but I think the ones with kids are more attuned to it, especially since obstetricians and pediatricians are encouraging the Tdap.

For sure, parents who are convinced vaccines are dangerous are not vaccinating themselves.

Quote:
We should also address our travel policies for the unvaccinated entering our country. Of course non vaccinated children are involved, and will spread disease if infected but they are only part of the problem and they will not prevent future outbreaks only help to infect fewer people. Remember, children under the age of two are still susceptible.
Again, unvaccinated kids are growing into unvaccinated adults. That is why childhood vaccination is the foundation of the whole process. Limiting the number of infected people is actually the goal, is it not?
 
Old 02-07-2015, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
23,263 posts, read 28,068,309 times
Reputation: 28701
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken S. View Post
I guess it was just a fluke that there were so many unvaccinated people at Disneyland who came into proximity of someone who was spreading it.
Yes, because Disneyland is in a part of the country that has a relatively high number of unvaccinated people. Local people go to theme parks, too.
 
Old 02-07-2015, 03:03 PM
 
1,385 posts, read 1,200,660 times
Reputation: 1707
So why aren't there major outbreaks linked to Disneyland every year, then?

It seems to me that in the end the hysteria is coming from the "medical community" and the media. The government is more than happy to seize upon this, and so here again we have another example of another relatively minor incident instigating a response that threatens individual rights and liberties.

Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
Yes, because Disneyland is in a part of the country that has a relatively high number of unvaccinated people. Local people go to theme parks, too.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Current Events
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:13 AM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top